Courses at Stony Brook University

CCS 396- H: Video and Computer Game History
The course examines video/computer games as historical artifacts while studying the processes of writing/documenting the history of videogames. Students will engage with histories of gaming companies and platforms, game designer memoirs, fiction, criticism, game analysis, theoretical writing, descriptive historical accounts, preservation practices, and ephemeral forms of historic documentation. Students will also have hands-on access to various console games from the 1970s to the present. This course is offered as both CCS 396 and DIA 396.

CCS 397- H: Video and Computer Game Culture
The course critically examines videogames within cultural, social, and political contexts. It will showcase the interaction between technology and culture and society by examining videogames in terms of play and game play, racial and gendered representation, racism and sexism, games in a global context of online play, power-relations between gamers, violence and moral panics, and military propaganda. This course is offered as both CCS 397 and DIA 397.

CFS 339- F: Children's Play

An investigation of the significance of play in human development, familiarizing the student with the psychological and sociological theories of play and considering the application of these theories in educational and clinical settings. The course is especially useful to students who are contemplating professional work with children.

CSE 352: Artificial Intelligence

Topics covered include critique of artificial intelligence research; state-space problem representations and search algorithms; gameplaying programs; theorem-proving programs; programs for the study and simulation of cognitive processes and pattern recognition. Further topics in current research as time permits.

CSE 380: Computer Game Programming

An introduction to the fundamental concepts of computer game programming. Students design and develop original games for PCs applying proven game design and software engineering principles.

CSE 381: Advanced Game Programming
This course explores the concepts and technologies behind making 3D, networked games. This will include the examination of game engine creation as well as the use of middleware to build graphically sophisticated game systems.

EST 310: Design of Computer Games

Fundamental ideas underlying the design of games, which occurs before the programming stage. How games function to create experiences, including rule design, play mechanics, game balancing, social game interaction and the integration of visual, audio, tactile and textual elements into the total game experience. Game design documentation and play testing. Students will design their own game during the semester.

ISE 340: Design of Computer Games

Fundamental ideas underlying the design of games, which occurs before the programming stage. How games function to create experiences, including rule design, play mechanics, game balancing, social game interaction and the integration of visual, audio, tactile and textual elements into the total game experience. Game design documentation and play testing. Students will design their own game during the semester.

ISE 364: Advanced Multimedia Techniques
Digital media production techniques for highbandwidth applications such as electronic magazine illustration, broadcast television, and motion picture special effects. Students explore techniques such as 3D modeling and character animation, video compositing, and high-resolution image processing in a stateof- the art multimedia computing laboratory. High-capacity mutlimedia storage, high-speed networks, and new technologies such as DVD, HDTV, and broadband will be reviewed. This course is offered as both CSE 364 and ISE 364.

MUS 300- H: Music, Technology, and Digital Culture

Study of the interactions between music, technology, and culture in popular and concert music since World War I. Issues of production, distribution, and reception, involving such topics as the impact of radio on composition in the 1920s and 1930s, early synthesizers, and the rise of electronic music, digital sampling and DJs, the MP3 phenomenon, cross-cultural borrowings, gender and technology, the internet, interactivity, and new models of consumption.

PSY 326: Children's Social and Emotional Development
Current theories, models, research methods, and findings in the study of children's socioemotional development. The course emphasizes the interaction of the individual with his or her social environment in developmental processes and outcomes. Eras covered include infancy, toddler/preschool, mid-late childhood, and adolescence.

SOC 243- F: Sociology of Youth

Adolescent socialization; age structures and intergenerational conflict; peer groups and youth subcultures.

SOC 315- H: Sociology of Technology
Social systems and the various "tools" they develop to shape their environment. Concentration on technologies of highly developed, modern societies and on ethical issues involved in attempts to guide the development and effects of these technologies. Consideration is given to the role of technology in all societies, from the simplest to the most developed.

SOC 330- F: Media and Society

The course examines changes in the use of mass communications media, such as newspapers, radio, television, and the Internet, over time, and assesses the implications of these changes for society. Consideration of the commercial use of mass media and the media's role in providing news for democratic societies. Emphasis on the global dimensions of the mass media, including how they shape Americans' understandings of other countries and peoples, and vice versa.

SOC 373- F: Collective Behavior

Major unstructured social phenomena - such as mob violence, panics, fads and fashions, and public opinion - as the outcome of collective problem-solving activity.

SOC 395- H: Topics in Science, Technology, and Society
Selected topics in sociology that examine significant examples of the impacts of science and technology on culture and society.

THR 341: Sound Design

An investigation into the scientific, formal and artistic qualities of sound developed for students who may or may not have had formal musical training. Students will write reviews of sound pieces, create film or game soundtracks, and create sound-based artworks in response to course content, and write a paper on acoustic or psycho-acoustic phenomena. Emphasis is on studio production techniques, history of sound art and basic acoustics. Students will work on Apple computers in the SINC site and LTA. This course is offered as ARS 341, MUS 341, and THR 341.


 

William A. Higinbotham

William HiginbothamAfter reading an instruction manual that accompanied a Donner Scientific Company analog computer, William Alfred Higinbotham was inspired to design Tennis for Two, the first computer game to utilize handheld controllers and to display motion. It was also the first game to be played by general public, in this instance, attendees of “visitors day” at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 1958. Learn More »

tennis for two