6. Long Island Digitized: Twentieth-Century Maps


The twentieth century has seen radical changes in cartography. Thematic maps (maps about a subject) have been widely used in this century. Conventional maps have been supplemented by aerial photographs and satellite images. Most maps are now produced using computers, and increasingly maps are being viewed on computer screens. The number of Long Island maps available on the Internet is growing exposively.


United States Geological Survey, Area around Huntington from Northport Quadrangle, 1903.
Typical early U.S.G.S. 15' map. Compare with digital map of same area shown below.
(Courtesy State University of New York at Stony Brook.)



United States Geological Survey, Topographic Map of Long Island New York, 1913.
Detail showing eastern Long Island.
(Courtesy State University of New York at Stony Brook.)



U.S. Bureau of Chemistry and Soils. Soil Map, Suffolk and Nassau Counties, 1928.
Part of the largest and most colorful thematic map of Long Island.
(Courtesy State University of New York at Stony Brook.)



Henry I. Jebb, Jebb Guide Map, Greater New York, 1930.
Real estate map showing growth of urbanized areas near New York.
(Courtesy State University of New York at Stony Brook.)



U.S. Bureau of the Census, "Nassau and Suffolk Couties: Black Population as a Percentage of the Total Population," from Urban Atlas; Tract Data for Standard Metropolitan Statistical Areas, 1974.
Example of a typical computer-produced map using census data. (Courtesy State University of New York at Stony Brook.)



United States Geological Survey, Huntington Quadrangle, 1979.
Detail of a small portion of a digital version of a modern topographic map.
(Courtesy State University of New York at Stony Brook.)



EROS Data Center, Satellite view of western Long Island.
Built up areas appear to be blue in this rendition.
(Courtesy State University of New York at Stony Brook.)





United States Geological Survey, Color aerial photograph of Port Jefferson area, 1988.
Rapidly growing vegetation, such as golf courses, appears to be red.
(Courtesy of State University of New York at Stony Brook.)



Population by Household Income in Suffolk County, N.Y.
Digital map produced using data files generated by the U.S. Census Bureau.
(Courtesy State University of New York at Stony Brook.)




Long Island Maps Elsewhere on the Internet

Click here for a portfolio of links to other sites on the World Wide Web where you can find Long Island maps.


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