Browsing: Student Spotlight

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Students shared the best study spots around campus. Following are the top 10 gems ideal for cramming, reviewing and brainstorming.

1. Wang Center
Probably the best kept secret on campus, the Wang Center offers serene and vast study locations with outlets galore and Wi-Fi throughout the building. It also provides access to Jasmine, ideal for students looking to refuel or get that added caffeine boost at the Tea House. Bubble tea, anyone? Open 8 am to 8 pm Monday through Friday, noon to 8 pm Saturday and Sunday.  

Wang

Bringing bold new ideas and undergraduate enthusiasm to the world, the Global Innovation Study Abroad program kicked off with a Summer 2017 mission to Kenya.  Created by the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences (CEAS) and hosted by the Turkana Basin Institute (TBI), the program aims to apply concepts from STEM field classrooms to help solve some of the everyday challenges facing in the developing world. Julian Kingston ’17, who attended the 2017 Global Engineering Field School as a teaching assistant, shares his account below. My name is Julian Kingston, a proud graduate of Stony Brook University, Class of 2017. This…

There’s only one thing more terrifying than the looming threat of final exams — the undead. As the semester’s end draws near, students joined together to fight the walking dead in Humans vs. Zombies, an imaginary game for students to live their apocalyptic fantasies. “I’ve been a part of the game for three years now at two different schools that had a strong following of players, both current students and alumni,” said Alexa Gilberti, one of the game’s moderators.“This game appeals to those who love a challenge and want to survive, as well as those who want to be a…

The State University of New York is working collaboratively with the Jewish Foundation for Education of Women (JFEW) to offer exciting scholarship opportunities to eligible applicants. Approximately 70 women have received the scholarship at Stony Brook alone since the program’s 2011 inception. The JFEW-SUNY International Relations and Global Affairs Program, funded by JFEW, is a two-year program for students from Stony Brook, Binghamton and Geneseo universities. It provides recipients with two years of scholarship support (up to $5,500 each year), a monthly seminar series for two academic years and, perhaps best of all, a paid internship in a New York-based global…

The study of objects less than a billionth of a meter, also known as “nanometers,” is a special research discipline that Materials Science and Engineering Professor Alexander Orlov has been working on for years. A major breakthrough in this field has been the emergence of a new generation of consumer products containing nanoparticles, nano-enabled biomedical devices and many other exciting developments straight out of science fiction novels. However, like many scientific breakthroughs, there is hesitation in the implementation of nanotechnology. “It is a very difficult area to describe, as you cannot see nanoparticles with the naked eye,” Orlov explained. “People…

A wall was erected outside of the Stony Brook Student Activities Center. It wasn’t large, or long, but it was made of black fabric. On the wall were small Post-It notes with messages of positivity and hope. One of the messages was a prominent “Don’t do it!” inscribed in bold lettering. In front of the wall were tables with pamphlets, stress balls, water bottles and bracelets. More noticeable, though, were the people that were in front of the wall. They waved neon-colored signs and chanted for people’s attention. Their signs read statistics and resources — “Suicide is the second leading…

Twenty-five Stony Brook University student leaders spent three days in July meeting with global leaders and working with students from other SUNY colleges to exercise and enhance their leadership skills. The SUNY Global Leader Experience was made possible through the SUNY SAIL Global Leadership Exchange in New York City. Students were nominated to participate by a university staff or faculty member based on their leadership skills and standing in the Stony Brook community. “Honestly, I walked out a different person with different views, greater team building, patience and friends. I was in an environment where everyone was so supportive,” said…

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“Heartbeats of Stony Brook,” an outdoor mural conceptualized by Naveen Mallangada ’17, was finally completed at the beginning of September.

Now a medical student, Naveen was able to connect the two hearts of the University with this project.

The beautification project was painted inside the Nichols Road underpass, connecting East Campus and West Campus with two heartbeats. It was mostly complete by April 2016, but planned construction on the hospital side prevented Mallangada from painting the second heartbeat until this semester. Mallangada, now a Stony Brook medical student, felt determined to finish the project as soon as construction was over, finally connecting the two hearts of the University.  

“In between studying for anatomy and biochemistry in the medical school, I squeezed time to finally complete the project,” he explained. “It just ended up that I painted the West Campus heart when I was an undergraduate, and I painted the East Campus heart in medical school. The project inadvertently represents my own transition between the campuses.”

The mural is meant to symbolize a connection between the two “hearts” of the University. “I felt the tunnel should reflect its importance to the students and the University community. I used that heart imagery to literally paint the hearts of campus,” Mallangada said.

The project was a community effort with help from people from all over the University. It’s Mallangada’s second project on campus, after he initiated the transformation of the Tabler Steps from regular stairs into piano keys. That previous experience gave him the tools he needed to undergo the larger project of painting the hospital tunnel.

“With the Tabler Piano Steps I learned the value of getting the word out, of collaborating and connecting with people. I learned to remain determined and persevere with an idea no matter the obstacle,” he said.

Mallangada sees his art as an extension of his mission to improve people’s lives. “As a medical student, your desire is to improve the lives of your patients and to become the best physician possible,” he explained. “I view public art as a form of public medicine, improving our surroundings, providing a message and depth to people’s daily lives, even for a moment.”

Without social mobility — the ability to rise from a low-income background to a financially secure future — the American Dream is at risk. In an era of growing income inequality, families have fewer opportunities to better their children’s future. Meanwhile, we endanger a national tradition of innovation and discovery when many of our best and brightest minds are left by the wayside. For many lower-income and first-generation students, attending college can seem like a pipe dream, with few people guiding them toward higher education. At Stony Brook University, a committed community of scholars, administrators and students is igniting social…

Kara Burnett grew up idolizing Oprah Winfrey. Hoping to emulate the famous talk show host, the Baldwin Harbor, NY resident knew she needed a school with a strong journalism program. At first she wanted to go out of state, but when her parents learned about Stony Brook’s School of Journalism, they urged her to apply. “I knew that if I wanted to graduate without huge loans, and invest that money into studying abroad and going to graduate school, I had to make a decision,” Kara said. She has since been rewarded for that decision. “The intimate class settings and support…

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