Browsing: Student Spotlight

The study of objects less than a billionth of a meter, also known as “nanometers,” is a special research discipline that Materials Science and Engineering Professor Alexander Orlov has been working on for years. A major breakthrough in this field has been the emergence of a new generation of consumer products containing nanoparticles, nano-enabled biomedical devices and many other exciting developments straight out of science fiction novels. However, like many scientific breakthroughs, there is hesitation in the implementation of nanotechnology. “It is a very difficult area to describe, as you cannot see nanoparticles with the naked eye,” Orlov explained. “People…

A wall was erected outside of the Stony Brook Student Activities Center. It wasn’t large, or long, but it was made of black fabric. On the wall were small Post-It notes with messages of positivity and hope. One of the messages was a prominent “Don’t do it!” inscribed in bold lettering. In front of the wall were tables with pamphlets, stress balls, water bottles and bracelets. More noticeable, though, were the people that were in front of the wall. They waved neon-colored signs and chanted for people’s attention. Their signs read statistics and resources — “Suicide is the second leading…

Twenty-five Stony Brook University student leaders spent three days in July meeting with global leaders and working with students from other SUNY colleges to exercise and enhance their leadership skills. The SUNY Global Leader Experience was made possible through the SUNY SAIL Global Leadership Exchange in New York City. Students were nominated to participate by a university staff or faculty member based on their leadership skills and standing in the Stony Brook community. “Honestly, I walked out a different person with different views, greater team building, patience and friends. I was in an environment where everyone was so supportive,” said…

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“Heartbeats of Stony Brook,” an outdoor mural conceptualized by Naveen Mallangada ’17, was finally completed at the beginning of September.

Now a medical student, Naveen was able to connect the two hearts of the University with this project.

The beautification project was painted inside the Nichols Road underpass, connecting East Campus and West Campus with two heartbeats. It was mostly complete by April 2016, but planned construction on the hospital side prevented Mallangada from painting the second heartbeat until this semester. Mallangada, now a Stony Brook medical student, felt determined to finish the project as soon as construction was over, finally connecting the two hearts of the University.  

“In between studying for anatomy and biochemistry in the medical school, I squeezed time to finally complete the project,” he explained. “It just ended up that I painted the West Campus heart when I was an undergraduate, and I painted the East Campus heart in medical school. The project inadvertently represents my own transition between the campuses.”

The mural is meant to symbolize a connection between the two “hearts” of the University. “I felt the tunnel should reflect its importance to the students and the University community. I used that heart imagery to literally paint the hearts of campus,” Mallangada said.

The project was a community effort with help from people from all over the University. It’s Mallangada’s second project on campus, after he initiated the transformation of the Tabler Steps from regular stairs into piano keys. That previous experience gave him the tools he needed to undergo the larger project of painting the hospital tunnel.

“With the Tabler Piano Steps I learned the value of getting the word out, of collaborating and connecting with people. I learned to remain determined and persevere with an idea no matter the obstacle,” he said.

Mallangada sees his art as an extension of his mission to improve people’s lives. “As a medical student, your desire is to improve the lives of your patients and to become the best physician possible,” he explained. “I view public art as a form of public medicine, improving our surroundings, providing a message and depth to people’s daily lives, even for a moment.”

Without social mobility — the ability to rise from a low-income background to a financially secure future — the American Dream is at risk. In an era of growing income inequality, families have fewer opportunities to better their children’s future. Meanwhile, we endanger a national tradition of innovation and discovery when many of our best and brightest minds are left by the wayside. For many lower-income and first-generation students, attending college can seem like a pipe dream, with few people guiding them toward higher education. At Stony Brook University, a committed community of scholars, administrators and students is igniting social…

Kara Burnett grew up idolizing Oprah Winfrey. Hoping to emulate the famous talk show host, the Baldwin Harbor, NY resident knew she needed a school with a strong journalism program. At first she wanted to go out of state, but when her parents learned about Stony Brook’s School of Journalism, they urged her to apply. “I knew that if I wanted to graduate without huge loans, and invest that money into studying abroad and going to graduate school, I had to make a decision,” Kara said. She has since been rewarded for that decision. “The intimate class settings and support…

The 2017 “22 under 22 Most Inspiring College Women” list from hercampus.com has been released, and it features Ann Lin, a senior in the Stony Brook University Honors College double majoring in Biochemistry and Economics. In Spring 2017 Lin was recognized nationally as a Goldwater Scholar and she has drawn attention as a rising star at scientific meetings and hackathons. Lin won an Outstanding Presentation award at the Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine Undergraduate Research Symposium in the category of Cancer Biology/Immunology. She has been in the spotlight at CalTech, where she was awarded “Best Social Hack” for the creation of a web platform that helps…

Celebrating 50 years of outstanding teaching, learning, and musicianship, Stony Brook University’s Department of Music can boast of outsize impact on the cultural scene worldwide. From opera stars to eminent musicologists, Stony Brook has spawned an impressive roster of talent that’s charting new territory in sound and performance. “We have justifiable pride in our notable faculty and 2,039 alumni who have fanned out throughout the world, performing in pre-eminent ensembles; teaching at prestigious institutions; creating, performing and studying music; and serving in important administrative capacities,” Department of Music Chair Perry Goldstein said. A prime example is the world-renowned Emerson String Quartet…

“When you’re in a class, you just see all this information put on a board,” says undergraduate researcher Justin Bell ’18. “Your job is to be a sponge and soak it all up. But research gave me a deeper appreciation for how much work and time and energy went into each of those discoveries.” Bell, a biology major in the University Scholars Program,  is the recipient of this year’s Chhabra-URECA Fellowship, an honor administered through Undergraduate Research and Creative Acctivities (URECA) at Stony Brook. The award, which annually recognizes an undergraduate researcher who has a passion and talent for science, provided support…

Stony Brook University graduate students Shruti Sharma and James Vassallo were elected to serve in positions on the Northeast Regional Board of Directors for the National Association of Graduate-Professional Students (NAGPS). They will represent graduate students in the northeast and at Stony Brook University on issues of importance to the graduate student community. They will also be involved in national and regional advocacy efforts. Shruti Sharma, a PhD candidate in Materials Science and Chemical Engineering and a guest researcher at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), was elected as the Northeast Regional International Student Concerns Advocate. James Vassallo, a Master’s in Public…

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