Browsing: STEMM

Relevant learning — a teaching method through which faculty reconfigure their curricula by linking academic content to real-world problems — has long been central to Stony Brook’s mission. Now a key national initiative in relevant learning is housed at the University thanks to a visionary program, Science Education for New Civic Engagements and Responsibilities (SENCER). Using the SENCER approach, for example, a biology professor may choose to teach a course from the perspective of an HIV/AIDS patient, or an engineering professor may identify problems in Third World countries and encourage the class to come up with solutions. Engaging students —…

Without social mobility — the ability to rise from a low-income background to a financially secure future — the American Dream is at risk. In an era of growing income inequality, families have fewer opportunities to better their children’s future. Meanwhile, we endanger a national tradition of innovation and discovery when many of our best and brightest minds are left by the wayside. For many lower-income and first-generation students, attending college can seem like a pipe dream, with few people guiding them toward higher education. At Stony Brook University, a committed community of scholars, administrators and students is igniting social…

Eric Brouzes, an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation CBET division entitled, “Physical Principles of Magnetic Extraction from Microfluidic Droplets.” This three-year, $300K award will study the extraction of magnetic beads from microfluidic droplets with the translational goal of developing an efficient way to access genetic information of single cells at high speed. These droplets are extremely stable, they act as capsules that do not merge with each other unless directed, and can be precisely controlled at high speed. That approach has proven beneficial in many applications, such…

The Siemens Competition — the nation’s premier competition in math, science and technology for high school students — has announced its semifinalists for this year. Out of 491 national semifinalists, 55 students were mentored by Stony Brook faculty; 12 of those were named regional finalists and will continue on to compete in November. Each year, students submit innovative individual and team research projects to regional and national levels of competition as they vie for college scholarships ranging from $1,000 up to $100,000. This year for the first time, a new prize structure guarantees that national finalists will receive a minimum of $25,000. The…

The 2017 “22 under 22 Most Inspiring College Women” list from hercampus.com has been released, and it features Ann Lin, a senior in the Stony Brook University Honors College double majoring in Biochemistry and Economics. In Spring 2017 Lin was recognized nationally as a Goldwater Scholar and she has drawn attention as a rising star at scientific meetings and hackathons. Lin won an Outstanding Presentation award at the Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine Undergraduate Research Symposium in the category of Cancer Biology/Immunology. She has been in the spotlight at CalTech, where she was awarded “Best Social Hack” for the creation of a web platform that helps…

Penguins are noisy, as any visitor to an aquarium knows. Penguins may be noisy in others ways too, according to a new study published in Nature Communications. Scientists have long used Adélie penguin populations to monitor the health of the Southern Ocean and to understand how major factors such as fishing and climate change impact the oceans and the animals that rely on them. Now an extensive analysis of all known data on Adélie penguin populations over the last 35 years has found that only a small fraction of year-to-year changes in Adélie penguin populations can be attributed to measurable factors such…

Professor Shu Jia, in the Department of Biomedical Engineering of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the School of Medicine, received a $1.97M, five year Maximizing Investigators’ Resource Award (MIRA) from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The goal of MIRA is to increase the efficiency of NIGMS funding by providing investigators with stability and flexibility to enhance productivity and foster cutting edge scientific breakthroughs. Jia’s research, “Exploring Single-Molecule Biophotonics for Ultrahigh-Resolution Spatiotemporal-Multiplexed Optical Microscopy” focuses on new technological developments to understand the distribution and interactions of molecules in…

A joint Stony Brook-BNL research team has found a way to capture the details of chemistry’s elaborate choreography as it happens. Led by Anatoly Frenkel, a professor in Stony Brook University’s Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Department who has a joint appointment with Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Chemistry Division, the team relied on computers that have learned to recognize the steps in a complex dance of atoms involved in chemical reactions. The findings should help them improve the performance of catalysts to drive reactions toward desired products faster. The method—developed by an interdisciplinary team of chemists, computational scientists, and physicists at…

Stony Brook’s Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, in collaboration with Scientific American, will launch a free, five-episode online series aimed at helping scientists and engineers write blogs and op-eds for magazines, newspapers and other news outlets. The series kicks off on Friday, October 13, 2017. The series will feature actor and science communication advocate Alan Alda and Scientific American Editor-in-Chief Mariette DiChristina. Alda will share his personal successes using improvisational theater exercises to build empathy and connection, while DiChristina will shed light on the kind of stories Scientific American readers are craving. This first special live-streamed event will air on Friday, October…

The eighth annual Meeting of the Minds: Stroke Symposium will be held on Friday, October 20, at the Charles B. Wang Center from 8 am to 12:30 pm. This year’s keynote speaker is Dr. Michael Tymianski, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Krembil Research Institute, Toronto Western Hospital, and NoNO, Inc. A renowned cerebrovascular neurosurgeon-scientist, Dr. Tymianski will speak about the development of PSD95 inhibitors for the treatment of ischemic stroke. Five specialists from Stony Brook will discuss the basic biology and translational potential of their research that can ultimately benefit stroke patients. “Meeting of the Minds: Stroke” is free and open to…

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