Browsing: STEMM

Professor Shu Jia, in the Department of Biomedical Engineering of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the School of Medicine, received a $1.97M, five year Maximizing Investigators’ Resource Award (MIRA) from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The goal of MIRA is to increase the efficiency of NIGMS funding by providing investigators with stability and flexibility to enhance productivity and foster cutting edge scientific breakthroughs. Jia’s research, “Exploring Single-Molecule Biophotonics for Ultrahigh-Resolution Spatiotemporal-Multiplexed Optical Microscopy” focuses on new technological developments to understand the distribution and interactions of molecules in…

A joint Stony Brook-BNL research team has found a way to capture the details of chemistry’s elaborate choreography as it happens. Led by Anatoly Frenkel, a professor in Stony Brook University’s Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Department who has a joint appointment with Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Chemistry Division, the team relied on computers that have learned to recognize the steps in a complex dance of atoms involved in chemical reactions. The findings should help them improve the performance of catalysts to drive reactions toward desired products faster. The method—developed by an interdisciplinary team of chemists, computational scientists, and physicists at…

Stony Brook’s Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science, in collaboration with Scientific American, will launch a free, five-episode online series aimed at helping scientists and engineers write blogs and op-eds for magazines, newspapers and other news outlets. The series kicks off on Friday, October 13, 2017. The series will feature actor and science communication advocate Alan Alda and Scientific American Editor-in-Chief Mariette DiChristina. Alda will share his personal successes using improvisational theater exercises to build empathy and connection, while DiChristina will shed light on the kind of stories Scientific American readers are craving. This first special live-streamed event will air on Friday, October…

The eighth annual Meeting of the Minds: Stroke Symposium will be held on Friday, October 20, at the Charles B. Wang Center from 8 am to 12:30 pm. This year’s keynote speaker is Dr. Michael Tymianski, University Health Network, University of Toronto, Krembil Research Institute, Toronto Western Hospital, and NoNO, Inc. A renowned cerebrovascular neurosurgeon-scientist, Dr. Tymianski will speak about the development of PSD95 inhibitors for the treatment of ischemic stroke. Five specialists from Stony Brook will discuss the basic biology and translational potential of their research that can ultimately benefit stroke patients. “Meeting of the Minds: Stroke” is free and open to…

Stony Brook University Professor Anatoly Frenkel, from the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has been elected a 2017 Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). He received this prestigious recognition for his outstanding physics research, specifically for seminal contributions to in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, transformative development of structural characterization methods for nanoparticles, and their pioneering applications to a broad range of functional nanomaterials in materials physics and catalysis science. Professor Frenkel joined the Stony Brook faculty in 2016 after working at Yeshiva University. He was a post-doctoral fellow at…

Nergis Mavalvala, Marble Professor of Astrophysics at MIT, will discuss “The Warped Universe: the one hundred year quest to discover Einstein’s gravitational waves” on Wednesday, October 11, at 4 pm at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Berkner Hall. Dr. Mavalvala, 2010 recipient of a MacArthur “genius” award, is a physicist whose research focuses on the detection of gravitational waves and quantum measurement science. She is a longtime member of the scientific team that announced in 2016 the first direct detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). The gravitational waves that LIGO detected are ripples in the spacetime…

“When you’re in a class, you just see all this information put on a board,” says undergraduate researcher Justin Bell ’18. “Your job is to be a sponge and soak it all up. But research gave me a deeper appreciation for how much work and time and energy went into each of those discoveries.” Bell, a biology major in the University Scholars Program,  is the recipient of this year’s Chhabra-URECA Fellowship, an honor administered through Undergraduate Research and Creative Acctivities (URECA) at Stony Brook. The award, which annually recognizes an undergraduate researcher who has a passion and talent for science, provided support…

Alda Center Conducts International Workshops and Expands Capacity with New Faculty and Staff The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University is responding to an ever-growing global demand for improvisation-based science communication training by building its instructional team and research capacity to serve more scientists via the Alda Method™. Since 2009, the Alda Center has served nearly 10,000 scientists and medical professionals in its workshops worldwide, with additional graduate students and faculty trained in courses and workshops on campus at Stony Brook University. Among more than 70 traveling workshops conducted for nearly 1,800 scientists from January 2017…

Computer Science doctoral candidates Mahsa Torkaman, Mina Abbasi Dinani and Laraib Iqbal Malik each earned a scholarship from the Anita Borg Institute and will attend the Grace Hopper Celebration of Women in Computing (GHC17) — the world’s largest computing event for women. The three students will represent Stony Brook University along with eight other students who will attend GHC17 supported by funding from the Department of Computer Science. The Orlando-based event will be held October 4 through October 6. Torkaman, who hails from Iran, was recommended for the prestigious scholarship by her advisor, Professor Allen Tannenbaum. “Mahsa excels as a…

In 2017, Stony Brook graduate student and ethnomusicologist Jay Loomis and assistant professor of computer science Roy Shilkrot teamed up to secure a grant to create 3D printed replicas of ancient wind instruments. The goal? To give museum-goers an opportunity to interact with rare instruments rather than merely viewing them through a glass enclosure. Loomis had been interested in wind instruments since he was a boy in Wisconsin, when he was struck deeply by flute music wafting from his car radio. After he moved to Long Island, his thirst for playing dovetailed with an insatiable curiosity about indigenous musical instruments. He hoped…

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