Browsing: STEMM

The world’s population is projected to increase by 2-3 billion over the next 40 years. Already, more than three quarters of a billion people lack access to clean drinking water and 85 percent live in the driest areas of the planet. Those statistics are inspiring chemist Ben Hsiao and his team at Stony Brook University. With support from the National Science Foundation (NSF), the team is hard at work designing nanometer-scale water filters that could soon make clean drinking water available and affordable for even the poorest of the poor. In a “Science Nation” video released by the National Science…

Often referred to as the “Oscars of Invention,” the R&D 100 Awards honor the top 100 proven technological advances of the past year as determined by a panel selected by R&D Magazine. Erik Muller, Principal Investigator in the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering at Stony Brook University, leads a collaborative project, “Ultra-compact Diamond X-Ray Monitors,” that has been selected as a finalist for the 2016 R&D 100 Awards. In addition to Muller and his team, the project also includes scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Case Western Reserve University who have developed x-ray detectors based on synthetic diamond that…

The Institute for Advanced Computational Science (IACS) has been awarded a five-year $3M National Science Foundation Research Traineeship (NRT) grant to support graduate students from the departments of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, Biomedical Informatics, Computer Science, Ecology and Evolution, and the schools of Journalism and Marine and Atmospheric Sciences. This unique and interdisciplinary grant is for Science Training & Research to Inform DEcisions (STRIDE). The award will prepare the next generation of scientists working with big data to support complex decision-making. STRIDE is an innovative training program that will provide STEM graduate students with unique interdisciplinary skills to assist, create…

Researchers at Stony Brook University have discovered that dystroglycan, a muscle cell receptor whose dysfunction causes muscular dystrophy, actually has a critical role in brain development. The finding, published in the journal Developmental Cell, may help to explain why a subset of children born with a dysfunction of this muscle receptor, also have neurological problems that can include seizures, intellectual disability, autism and severe learning disabilities. In the newborn brain, one of the critical changes that occurs is that specialized pockets form that serve to house and nurture neural stem cells throughout life in discrete regions termed stem cell niches. Lead…

Stony Brook University President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., MD, is featured in a newly released video from The Science Coalition, an organization supporting federal funding for research institutions. Dr. Stanley is a strong advocate for federal funding of basic research and the role of university research in innovation and discovery. In the video he discusses the critical importance of young researchers, their role in discovery and ensuring that they opportunities to participate in America’s research enterprise. He previously penned an op-ed on this topic for Scientific American. The Science Coalition is a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization of the nation’s leading public…

Dr. Minghua Zhang, Professor in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), has been appointed Editor in Chief of the prestigious academic journal JGR-Atmospheres. Atmospheres is a publication of the American Geophysical Union, the leading organization for geophysicists, focusing on the organization and dissemination of scientific information in the field. Dr. Zhang received his PhD at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics at the Chinese Academy of Sciences and then joined Stony Brook in 1988 as a postdoctoral scholar. He later became an assistant and associate professor, then professor and director of the Institute for Terrestrial and Planetary Atmospheres. He also served as associate…

In a pioneering partnership that could lead to new treatments for periodontal disease, Stony Brook University’s School of Dental Medicine and Traverse Biosciences have received a $1.3 million award from the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The funding is intended to further evaluate the pre-clinical safety and effectiveness of the Traverse’s leading drug candidate, TRB-N0224, for the treatment of periodontal disease. The research will be led by Lorne Golub, DMD, in the Department of Oral Biology and Pathology, and Ying Gu, PhD, DDS, in the Department of General Dentistry at…

A partnership between Stony Brook University’s Global Health Institute, the University’s Centre ValBio and Vayu, Inc. used self-guided drones to transport lab samples from rural villages to centralized labs August 5, 2016 — Drones have become ubiquitous in our society; there is a national drone film festival, a national drone racing championship, and drones are being used extensively by the military for surveillance. But what would the world look like if this technology were used to improve the lives of the global poor? For the first time in history, drones are being used in a new, life-saving way to improve…

Biology Student Finds a Lab That Makes a Difference in Peoples’ Lives Biology major Louis Susca ’16 was looking for a lab with an interpersonal focus. He found it in Stony Brook’s Center For Dance, Movement and Somatic Learning, where Founding Director Amy Yopp Sullivan leads a workshop designed to enhance the lives of Parkinson’s patients.  Every week during the academic year, Susca assists as a small group of patients experience the benefits of movement, dance and creative thinking. For Susca, studying neurological science means more than just hitting the books. The workshop has taught him the importance of a…

A team of international scientists led by Stony Brook University researchers have created an ultra-fast, computerized way to model protein interactions, potentially helping to speed needed drugs to market. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are the basis of cellular functions, and when these processes are compromised diseases such as cancer emerge. For years scientists have tried with mixed success to map out PPIs to understand cellular processes. Now researchers led by Stony Brook’s Dima Kozakov have outlined a method that could pave the way to designing new drugs that prevent problematic protein interactions that lead to disease. The findings are published in the early online…

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