Browsing: Medicine: General

Stony Brook University and the School Intervention and Re-entry Program at Stony Brook Children’s are offering a college planning workshop specifically targeted to students with cancer, blood disorders and other serious illnesses. This free event will be held on Sunday, September 18, from 12 pm to 2 pm at the Charles B. Wang Center. The expo will include workshops addressing college selection, the application and admissions process, residential life, cost and finances and financial aid. Representatives from many regional colleges will be available to speak one-on-one with students and families about their schools, programs, services, and to answer questions. A complimentary lunch is included. Space is limited, so…

Findings from Study Will Help Youth with Autism Who Struggle with Social Challenges Dr. Matthew D. Lerner, an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at Stony Brook University, received a $2.3M Biobehavioral Research Award for Innovative New Scientists (BRAINS) from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) for his research project, “Optimizing Prediction of Social Deficits in Autism Spectrum Disorders.” The goal of the BRAINS program is to support outstanding young scientists such as Professor Lerner in launching innovative clinical, translational, basic or services research that can profoundly transform the understanding, diagnosis, treatment or prevention of mental disorders. Lerner…

Their paths into medicine are varied and inspiring – this is the Stony Brook University School of Medicine Class of 2020. All 132 incoming students officially began their training with the School’s annual White Coat Ceremony on August 14. At the event the students received the physician-in-training white coat and took the Hippocratic Oath for the first time. The students hail from New York State, seven other states, and from around the world. They represent 70 undergraduate schools, have a collective grade point average of 3.70 and an average MCAT score in the 86 percentile. Only 8.3 percent of the…

In a collaboration that promises to accelerate cutting-edge research and foster tomorrow’s medical discoveries, Stony Brook Medicine and Mount Sinai Health System have entered into an affiliation agreement aimed at heightening research collaboration and enhancing academic programs and clinical care initiatives. “This is a momentous day for academic medicine, health care, our respective students, faculty and staff, and for all those who are cared for by our teams of highly trained, dedicated clinicians,” said Stony Brook University President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., MD. “Each institution has so much to offer, so this is an opportunity that will prove to be beneficial…

Stony Brook University launched its new Coursera program on Global Health Diplomacy on August 8. In this seven-week Massive Open Online Course (MOOC), students will be immersed in the diplomatic, financial and geopolitical context that underlies global health decision-making. They will be able to navigate their way through course articles and videos and test their knowledge through voluntary assessments. DoIT’s team of consultants from Academic Technology Services, the Faculty Center and Video Production all played a crucial role in the development of this new course, spending countless hours and numerous weeks perfecting the program to enhance the student learning experience. Jennifer Adams,…

Stony Brook University PhD student James Scheuermann won first place in the John R. Cameron Young Investigators Competition held by the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM). The award was presented at the 58th annual AAPM meeting in Washington, DC, July 31 through August 4. The competition is held each year for young investigators, with the top projects presented in a special symposium at the annual meeting. Scheuermann is studying medical physics in the Departments of Radiology and Biomedical Engineering. He is a research assistant in the Digital Radiological Imagining Laboratory led by Wei Zhao, a professor in the…

A team of international scientists led by Stony Brook University researchers have created an ultra-fast, computerized way to model protein interactions, potentially helping to speed needed drugs to market. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are the basis of cellular functions, and when these processes are compromised diseases such as cancer emerge. For years scientists have tried with mixed success to map out PPIs to understand cellular processes. Now researchers led by Stony Brook’s Dima Kozakov have outlined a method that could pave the way to designing new drugs that prevent problematic protein interactions that lead to disease. The findings are published in the early online…

After more than half a century in the field of microbiology — 22 years of which have been spent at Stony Brook Medicine — JoAnn Becht has seen first-hand the many laboratory automation systems that have evolved her field into the lifesaving science it is today. Thanks to technology, what once took a lab technician four hours to complete in a single inoculation tube can now be done many times over in a mere 20 minutes. Be it the Abbot Autoback ID System of 1982, VIVTEK systems in 1989, the MALDI/TOF cards of the 2000s or the BD FX instrument…

Diamond beam monitors could form the basis of the next generation of radiation therapy for cancer, according to a national team of researchers led by Stony Brook’s Erik Muller, PhD. Muller, Senior Research Scientist and Adjunct Professor, Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, is developing high-speed synthetic diamond beam monitors that detect proton and carbon ion beams used for cancer radiation therapy. The research team also includes scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory. The technology, supported by a two-year $500,000 grant from the High Energy Physics Section of the Department of Energy, is designed to provide…

By studying daily activity levels and heart rate patterns of those who suffer from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), Stony Brook scientists are looking  to achieve a better understanding of the complex and baffling condition. Fred Friedberg, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Stony Brook University School of Medicine, has received a four-year $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to determine if heart rate fluctuations in combination with certain daily activity patterns can be used to predict or prevent relapse in people with CFS. According to Dr. Friedberg, also the President of the International Association for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, CFS…

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