Browsing: Medicine: General

Dr. L. Douglas Ried, Dean of Stony Brook University’s School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences (SPPS) recently visited Washington, DC, to advocate for the School’s federal legislative priorities. Dean Ried met with Congressman Lee Zeldin and the health policy staff of Leader Chuck Schumer, Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, Congresswoman Kathleen Rice, Congressman Peter King and Congressman Tom Suozzi. Legislative priorities discussed included the Pharmacy and Medically Underserved Areas Enhancement Act, which would enable Medicare beneficiaries access to pharmacist-provided services under Medicare Part B by amending the Social Security Act. These services would be reimbursable under Medicare Part B if they are provided in medically…

Suffolk County reportedly has recorded the most car accidents caused by sleepy drivers in the state; Stony Brook University researchers are on a mission to help turn that around. The School of Health Technology & Management (SHTM) was recently awarded a General Highway Safety Grant to conduct research to put together insights, methods of prevention and a program to combat drowsy driving among college students. The research project timeline runs from October of last year through September 2018 and will involve data collection on sleep habits and drowsy driving behaviors among Stony Brook commuter students, the development of a research-informed…

Going inside a large medical scanner can be scary, especially when you’re a child. But what if children could perform a pretend scan themselves to learn what will happen beforehand? The Kitten Scanner, the newest addition to Stony Brook Children’s Hospital, is a miniature play-version of a computer-aided tomography (CAT) scanner, designed to help ease the anxiety CAT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans can cause. This special scanner is one of only three in the entire Northeast. Child Life Specialists help pediatric patients choose an elephant, chicken, alligator or robot, place it on the scanner bed, and slide the bed…

Opioid use and abuse is in the news virtually every day. But one area of concern that receives little press is opioid dependency among pregnant women. In a New York State summit held earlier this year, a number of key recommendations related to the opioid crisis and the care of pregnant women were developed. The summit was co-chaired by David Garry, DO, FACOG, Professor of Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology at Stony Brook University School of Medicine, an expert on the topic of opioid dependency in pregnant women. Like opioid use disorder in general, addiction in this group is a growing crisis. Babies delivered to mothers who…

Pediatric and Adult Endocrinology’s “Teens and Transition Diabetes Night” offers an opportunity for tweens and teens (ages 12 to 18) to meet new friends and learn how to become more independent. The event, which will be held on Tuesday, January 23, from 6:30 pm to 8 pm at the new Stony Brook Medicine Advanced Specialty Care facility (500 Commack Road, Commack, NY), is open to the public, and you do not need to be a Stony Brook Children’s Hospital patient to attend. Dr. Jennifer Osipoff, pediatric endocrinologist, will review diabetes self-care, including hands-on practice using pumps and injections. Dr. Marina…

Thanks to pioneering work at Stony Brook Medicine, digital solutions are in development for Pathology slide specimens — the last major frontier in digitizing medical images. Dr. Joel Saltz, Chair of Biomedical Informatics at Stony Brook Medicine and a board-certified clinical pathologist with a PhD in Computer Science, is at the forefront of this major breakthrough. For more than 20 years, Dr. Saltz and his team, which includes physicians and technologists from Johns Hopkins, Ohio State, Emory and Stony Brook, have been developing digital solutions for pathology slide specimens. His groundbreaking work in digital image viewing and archiving systems for…

First responders to the 9/11 World Trade Center disaster, Stony Brook Medicine staff and community members gathered on November 28 for the grand opening of the new World Trade Center (WTC) Health Program Long Island Clinical Center of Excellence in Commack. The WTC Health Program — the clinical component of Stony Brook’s WTC Wellness Program — moved to Advanced Specialty Care, Stony Brook Medicine’s new multi-specialty care center at 500 Commack Road, in April. The WTC Wellness Program includes patient care, research, education and outreach. As a component of the Wellness Program, the WTC Health Program provides health monitoring and…

Stony Brook Medicine is the first hospital on Long Island and across the New York metropolitan area to implant a new commercially available retinal device known as the “bionic eye” to provide artificial vision for patients with retinitis pigmentosa. The first commercially available retinal implant surgery was performed in October by Khurram Chaudhary, M.D., a Retinal Surgeon at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. After 20 years of blindness, the patient, Linda Kirk, 67, of Port Jefferson, can now distinguish light from dark, some shapes, and movements. And it all happened within 10 minutes after an implanted retinal device was…

The Stony Brook University School of Nursing is launching a PhD in Nursing that will begin in the summer of 2018. The PhD in Nursing Program emphasizes education and training at the highest level in order to develop the next generation of nurse scientists and educators skilled in research methodologies useful in all areas of nursing science to improve the health and well-being of the population. The 54-credit program is designed to take 2.5 years to complete, with an additional year for dissertation completion. According to the American Association of Colleges of Nursing, (AACN), the current national demand for nurses with PhD-level education…

The man in the big red nose and stethoscope may have seemed silly, but his message couldn’t be more serious. Humor is more than a lighthearted distraction. Infused with awareness and empathy, humor nourishes a culture of compassion that benefits patients and hospital staff alike. Professional medical clown Michael Christensen and theatre scholar Atay Citron brought their skills to Stony Brook Medicine on Oct. 26. Christensen’s workshop on interacting with humor, and Citron’s lecture on medical clowning around the world, showed staff and students how to bring clowning techniques into relationships with patients, each other and even themselves. “Everybody has a sense…

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