Browsing: Medicine: General

Genetics PhD candidate Alex Bott is ready to take his place in the front ranks of the fight against cancer, and he has the grants to prove it. This past year, Bott was recognized with two prestigious and highly competitive awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH): the F31 (Predoctoral Individual National Research Service Award) and the newly-established F99/K00 — the Predoctoral to Postdoctoral Fellow Transition Award, which is designed to encourage and retain outstanding graduate students who have demonstrated potential to pursue careers as independent cancer researchers. Bott’s research focuses on Myc, a regulator gene amplified in a wide range of cancers, particularly breast cancer.…

The first Polysomnographic Technology Bachelor of Science program in the Northeast is approved for accreditation at Stony Brook University’s School of Health Technology and Management. Polysomnographic technologists are healthcare practitioners who use high-tech equipment to diagnose and treat patients with sleep disorders. They work with a wide variety of patients and provide services in many settings including hospitals, clinics and physician offices. The 23-month, 79-credit program — accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs — incorporates more than 950 clinical hours, as well as courses in management, dental sleep medicine, therapeutic modalities, research methods, and various other…

Andrew Flescher, PhD, a Professor in the Department of Family, Population and Preventive Medicine at Stony Brook University School of Medicine, has been appointed to serve on the national ethics committee of the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS), the country’s non-profit organization that manages the nationwide organ procurement and transplant program. His three-year term will begin July 1st. Responsibilities of membership on the national ethics committee include support and advancement of the key goals of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN), deliberating the many ethic issues related to organ procurement and allocation; as well as making recommendations for transplantation policy and laws. Dr.…

Stony Brook-led research into the structure of a key enzyme involved with cell growth regulation could offer important clues to understanding cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease. The finding, published in PNAS, reveals the first visualization of the enzyme and could provide insight into how the enzyme is activated. The enzyme, neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase2), is one of the major enzymes that produces ceramide in the body. Ceramides are oil-like lipids that are produced in response to chemotherapy and other cell stresses. The ceramides that nSMase2 produces allow cancer cells to pass DNA and proteins to other cells to change…

Every day, more and more cancer patients are surviving and thriving. That was just one of the positive messages on Sunday, June 4, when Stony Brook Cancer Center welcomed 300 courageous people who are living proof that cancer diagnosis and treatment have come far. “Together we can push back on cancer,” declared Yusuf A. Hannun, MD, Director, Stony Brook University Cancer Center and Vice Dean of Cancer Medicine. The audience met his welcome with cheers and applause for the miracle of being alive. More than 1,100 people attended the event, Stony Brook’s 13th annual recognition of this worldwide celebration. Stony Brook…

The Suffolk County Volunteer Firefighters Burn Center (SCVFBC) at Stony Brook University Hospital is Suffolk County’s only dedicated burn care unit, thanks to fundraising by volunteer firefighters. At Burn Center Recognition Day on May 21, Stony Brook Medicine staff gathered with volunteer firefighters, EMS personnel and local residents to honor the partnership between the Burn Center and the Suffolk County Volunteer Firefighters Burn Center Fund. The Burn Center at Stony Brook is the only dedicated burn care facility serving Suffolk County’s 1.5 million residents. It has relied on the more than $1 million raised during the past 30 years by…

Thursday, June 22, 6:15 pm (gates open at 5:35 pm) Join Stony Brook Children’s Hospital as the Long Island Ducks host the Somerset Patriots. This family-friendly event includes free Quackers and sunglasses for the first 1,500 fans, interactive exhibits, hands-on activities and health demonstrations. Stony Brook employees can take advantage of a special ticket rate of $10 per person through end of day Friday, June 16. Call Sean Smith at (631) 940-3825 x108 to place your order. Any questions can also be emailed to tickets@liducks.com. Wear red to show your Stony Brook spirit!

Stony Brook University and the School of Health Technology and Management have announced a new Master of Health Administration (MHA) Program at Stony Brook Southampton. The program, beginning with a cohort of students in August, will be delivered in a blended format, to include online coursework complimented by face-to-face programs and networking events held in Southampton two times each year.  This flexible structure is meant to accommodate a variety of busy schedules while maintaining a highly rigorous health management course of study. The program welcomes applications from members of the community who may be considering a first time professional opportunity…

SUNY ranked 38th in the “Top 100 Worldwide Universities Granted U.S. Utility Patents for 2016,” according to the National Academy of Inventors and Intellectual Property Owners Association, which publishes the ranking annually based on U.S. Patent and Trademark Office data. SUNY campuses overall were awarded 57 U.S. utility patents. Among those from Stony Brook University is a redesigned a catheter developed by a multidisciplinary team led by Annie Rohan from the School of Nursing. The catheter incorporates LED lights to reduce the likelihood of infection after the device is inserted into a patient’s body. “Catheter-related infections are a multibillion-dollar-a-year problem,” says Rohan. “Healthcare providers have…

APS Type 1 (Autoimmune Polyglandular Syndrome Type 1) also known as Autoimmune Polyendocrinopathy Syndrome Type 1, is a rare, inherited disease characterized by immune-cell dysfunction with multiple autoimmunities. Caused by a mutated gene, this disorder presents in childhood, is chronic and has the potential to be life threatening. Because the disorder is rare, occurring in as few as one out of every two to three million people in the U.S., and has symptoms that are common with other disorders, diagnosing the disease can be difficult. To help support the APS Type 1 community, share cutting-edge research and raise awareness, the…

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