Browsing: Research

A newly discovered dinosaur that lived approximately 215 million years ago (Triassic Period) in the region of New Mexico is providing a team of paleontologists new information on early dinosaur evolution. Reported in the December 11 issue of Science, an analysis of Tawa hallae, a meat-eating theropod dinosaur between two-and-four meters long, reveals that the early history of theropods was characterized by waves of migration from South America, not just localized or regional species diversification. “To understand how these early theropods were related evolutionarily, we analyzed hundreds of morphological features, then used recently devised statistical methods to model how the…

Governor David A. Paterson has announced that Stony Brook will lead the New York Energy Policy Institute (NYEPI), a key initiative from the Governor’s State of the State address. Working in partnership with Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Syracuse University, this consortium will coordinate the work of New York’s leading energy research centers and experts and serve as a resource for the State’s policymakers. “New York’s universities are fortunate to have some of the nation’s leading energy experts on their faculties, and the New York Energy Policy Institute will bring together the best and brightest minds in the energy field to…

Ruoyi Jiang, a senior at Ward Melville High School, was named the individual Grand Prize winner in the prestigious nationwide 2009 Siemens Competition in Math, Science, and Technology. Jiang conducted his research at Stony Brook and Brookhaven National Laboratory under the mentorship of Carlos Simmerling, Professor of Chemistry. Jiang, 17, won a $100,000 scholarship for his research on chemotherapy drug resistance. He is the first Grand Prize winner of the Siemens competition to have done research at Stony Brook in the “individual” category; twice previously, the Grand Prize “team” winners worked with Stony Brook faculty mentors, including Professor Iwao Ojima…

Since May 25, 2009, when North Korea announced that it conducted a second nuclear test, the exact location of the test site has remained elusive to international organizations, federal agencies, military, and the scientific community, until now. A new study from Stony Brook, performed by Lianxing Wen, Professor of Geophysics, and graduate student Hui Long in the Department of Geosciences, has pinpointed the test site with a geographic precision of just 140 meters, which has never been done before in the scientific community. The precision from the U.S. Geological Survey, which was the best result being used by the National…

The regional finalists and semifinalists in the 2009-2010 Siemens Competition include 31 high school students who worked with Stony Brook faculty mentors. The Siemens Competition is one of the top nationwide research competitions for high school researchers. Stony Brook annually ranks among the leaders in universities nationwide who mentor these students. Eight awardees worked with faculty from the Department of Chemistry. Seventeen awardees (three regional finalists and 14 semifinalists) were mentored by Miriam Rafailovich, Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Director of the Garcia Center. She is one of the nation’s leading mentors of research competition talent and has…

Joanna Fowler, senior chemist; director of the Radiotracer Chemistry, Instrumentation, and Biological Imaging Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory; and adjunct faculty member in Stony Brook’s Department of Chemistry, will be awarded the National Medal of Science at a White House ceremony on Wednesday, October 7. She is one of nine researchers named by President Barack Obama to receive the nation’s highest award for lifetime achievement in science. The National Medal of Science was created by statute in 1959 and is administered for the White House by the National Science Foundation. The annual award recognizes individuals who have made outstanding contributions…

Scientist Participates in First U.S. Lunar Mission in More Than a Decade The launch of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) this summer marked the first step in NASA’s return to the moon and the first U.S. lunar mission in more than a decade. The scientific instruments on LRO will map the moon in unprecedented detail, paving the way for humans to return to our nearest planetary neighbor in 2020. Timothy Glotch, assistant professor of geosciences, is a member of the Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (DLRE) science team. Diviner will make high-resolution maps of lunar surface temperatures that will help scientists…

Little-Known Marine Decomposers Attract the Attention of Genome Sequencers The Department of Energy’s Joint Genome Institute (JGI) will sequence the genomes of four species of labyrinthulomycetes. These little-known marine species were selected for sequencing as the result of a proposal submitted to the competitive JGI Community Sequencing Program by a team of microbiologists led by Jackie Collier, assistant professor at the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS) at Stony Brook. “Labyrinthulomycetes are a huge group of organisms that behave ecologically like fungi,” said Collier. “But we know so little about them and there is more diversity among this group…

Elizabeth M. Boon, assistant professor of chemistry, has been selected by Barack Obama as a recipient of the Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE). In addition to receiving an invitation to the White House to receive her award from President Obama, Boon will receive $200,000 per year for up to five years to continue her research. Established in February 1996 when the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) was commissioned, the Presidential Award is the highest honor bestowed by the U.S. government on outstanding scientists and engineers beginning their independent careers. The goal of PECASE awards is to…

Jennifer L. Verdolin, a postdoctoral research fellow in ecology and evolution, has published her first book, Prairie Dogs: Communication and Community in an Animal Society, released by Harvard University Press. Verdolin co-authored the book with Con Slobodchikoff, a professor of biology at Northern Arizona University, and Bianca S. Perla, who has a doctorate in ecology from the University of Washington.  Prairie dogs, once considered the scourge of the West, get a new image in this book. Long considered pests and vermin, prairie dogs have been poisoned and exterminated for more than 100 years to the point where they are now…

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