Browsing: Research

Indicators of aging based only on chronological age are misleading and need to be adjusted to take into account advances in health and life expectancy, as reported in the September 10, 2010, issue of Science by Warren Sanderson, Professor in Stony Brook’s Department of Economics, and Sergei Scherbov, Vienna Institute of Demography (Austrian Academy of Sciences). Both are affiliated with the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis in Laxenburg, Austria. The article, “Remeasuring Aging,” calls for the adoption of the adult disability dependency ratio, which measures aging based on the ratio of those who need care to those who can…

Fossils of an ancient crocodile with mammal-like teeth discovered in the Rukwa Rift Basin of Tanzania is changing the picture of animal life at 100 million years in what is now sub-Saharan Africa. The new species, found by an international team of scientists, including Joseph Sertich from Stony Brook, is named Pakasuchus. “Paka” is the Ki-Swahili name for “cat” and “souchos” is Greek for crocodile.  The scientists analyze the anatomical structure and evolution of the new species in the August 5 issue of Nature. The scientists describe the new species of notosuchian crocodyliform as a small animal whose head would…

Lorna W. Role, Chair of the Department of Neurobiology and Behavior, and member of the Central Nervous System Disorders Center in the Centers for Molecular Medicine at Stony Brook, has been named a winner of the prestigious Director’s Pioneer Award from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) for her proposal for light-induced deep brain stimulation of cholinergic neurons that are involved in degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer’s. The Director’s Pioneer Award is designed to support a small number of investigators of exceptional creativity who propose bold and highly innovative new research approaches that have the potential to produce a…

Transportation consumes 70 percent of U.S. oil, but less than 20 percent of fuel energy is used to drive cars. Lei Zuo, a professor from the Department of Mechanical Engineering, is the principal investigator of a new invention, the electricity-generating shock absorber, which continuously harvests vehicle vibration energy due to road irregularities, in contrast to traditional shock absorbers that dissipate the vibration energy into waste heat. Several prototypes of electromagnetic shock absorbers have been developed at Stony Brook. “One stone kills two birds” said Zuo. “On one side, we can mitigate the vibration of vehicles; on the other, we are…

Stony Brook University School of Medicine, through the SUNY Research Foundation, received a $5.5 million grant from the New York State Department of Health (DOH) to support stem cell research, training, and biomedical research infrastructure. The grant was awarded as part of $30.5 million in funding approved by the Empire State Stem Cell Board in May to support the work of 10 research institutions across the state. SBU will receive the third highest total funding among the state institutions. “Investment in stem cell research facilities stimulates our biomedical industry, creates job opportunities, and develops a competitive research pipeline,” said Governor…

The Gelfond Fund for Mercury Related Research and Outreach, established by SBU alum Richard Gelfond, CEO and Director of IMAX Corporation and Chair of the Stony Brook Foundation, will advance scientific understanding of methylmercury accumulation in human diets and its effects on human health. Almost 25 percent of all New York City adults and nearly 50 percent of Asian New Yorkers are estimated to have blood mercury levels at or over the New York State reportable level, according to a 2007 study by the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Humans are primarily exposed to mercury through consumption of…

Stony Brook is once again in select company—it belongs to a group of leading research universities that participates in Futurity.org, an online research channel covering the latest discoveries in science, engineering, the environment, health, and other cutting-edge topics. One story involving Stony Brook research features a report on how young lemon sharks in the Bahamas stay close to their birthplace as they mature. Demian Chapman, shark scientist with the Institute for Ocean Conservation Science at Stony Brook, wrote the story about lemon sharks. Stony Brook researcher Arthur Stone recently took part in reporting the findings of a survey suggesting that…

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is receiving $260.9 million in new science funding from President Obama’s American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, principally to accelerate construction of the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), a new $912-million project that began construction in 2009. The funds are part of $1.2 billion announced by Secretary of Energy Steven Chu from funding allocated under the Recovery Act to the Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The funds will support an array of Office of Science-sponsored construction, laboratory infrastructure, and research projects across the nation. “Thanks to funding from the Recovery Act, there are some great…

The Institute of Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery (ICB&DD) team, consisting of Subramanyan Swaminathan (PI), Brookhaven National Laboratory Department of Biology; Iwao Ojima (Co-PI), ICB&DD Director; Peter Tonge (Co-I), Department of Chemistry; and Robert Rizzo (Co-I),  Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics, has received a research consortium grant award from the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, which is part of the Department of Defense. This grant award is for the project “Structure-Based Discovery of Pan-Active Botulinum Neurotoxin Inhibitors.” Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent toxins known to humans and are considered to be potential biowarfare agents. As a consequence, the…

A newly discovered dinosaur that lived approximately 215 million years ago (Triassic Period) in the region of New Mexico is providing a team of paleontologists new information on early dinosaur evolution. Reported in the December 11 issue of Science, an analysis of Tawa hallae, a meat-eating theropod dinosaur between two-and-four meters long, reveals that the early history of theropods was characterized by waves of migration from South America, not just localized or regional species diversification. “To understand how these early theropods were related evolutionarily, we analyzed hundreds of morphological features, then used recently devised statistical methods to model how the…

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