Browsing: Research

It’s the little things that matter to Bilal Haider ’17 — little things that could potentially lead to big ideas that could in turn change the face of medical research. Bilal, a Biomedical Engineering major at Stony Brook, is off to pursue a PhD degree in biomedical engineering with a focus on nanotechnology at Tufts University this fall. Working in Balaji Sitharaman’s Stony Brook laboratory with graduate student Drasti Kanakia, the pair wanted to see whether graphene nanoribbons and nanoplatelets could deliver genetic material to neural cells to potentially treat Alzheimer’s disease. But their preliminary steps involved delivering these structures…

Alum Bryan Perozzi ’16, now a research scientist at Google, won the Association of Computing Machinery SIGKDD, KDD 2017 Doctoral Dissertation award for his work at Stony Brook University. The annual award acknowledges excellent doctoral research in the field of data mining and knowledge discovery. Perozzi thesis, Local Modeling of Attributed Graphs: Algorithms and Applications, was recognized as the best dissertation of the year in the data science community. His work involves graph embeddings — ways of representing the knowledge encoded in the structure of networks to make them accessible for machine learning models. Focused on developing scalable algorithms and models for…

For biology major Aaron Kuang ’18, undergraduate research is a “completely different beast than taking classes.” “What I’ve gained is definitely something that I would never have accomplished or learned if I stayed with lectures and introductory biology labs only,” Kuang said. Kuang has spent many hours over the last year doing research in the spinal cord injury translational lab of Dr. Prithvi Shah. Although he was very active in this laboratory’s experiments throughout the 2016-2017 academic year, and has been immersed in research full time this summer, Aaron clearly remembers being daunted by the prospect of starting undergrad research, wondering…

A research team from Stony Brook University and Brookhaven National Laboratory has been studying argon gas, and the group’s findings have been published in Nature Communications. Argon and other noble gases have previously been trapped in three-dimensional porous materials. Prior to the SBU-BNL research, immobilizing these gases on surfaces had only been achieved by either cooling them to very low temperatures to condense them, or by accelerating gas ions to implant them directly into materials. The SBU-BNL research team synthesized a two-dimensional structure and successfully trapped argon atoms inside the nanosized pore structure at room temperature. This achievement will enable…

It seems fitting that Henry Towery ’17 — who grew up in Corning, New York, and was raised by a father who worked with fiber optics — would opt to specialize in the medical imaging portion of biomedical engineering. “Stony Brook had a well-established biomedical engineering program that surpassed all of the other programs,” said Henry. “It also features a hospital, which I viewed as a great resource for research facilities.” And make use of that resource he did, in every way he could. For example, Henry assisted with Harvard’s ICON Reload study in its Stony Brook Hospital location. The study sought to develop a…

An extraordinary gathering of scientists and dignitaries broke ground on July 21, 1017, for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), a leading-edge, international experiment for neutrino science and proton decay studies in which Stony Brook University will play an important role. Discoveries over the past half-century have put neutrinos, the most abundant matter particles in the universe, in the spotlight for further research into several fundamental questions about the nature of matter and the evolution of the universe — questions that DUNE will seek to answer. Stony Brook University’s Nucleon Decay and Neutrino (NN) research group, led by SUNY Distinguished…

Enrolling at Stony Brook University as a shy student from upstate New York, Janki Patel ’17 could have never envisioned the leader she would become. “Coming from a small high school, I didn’t have the academic opportunities that many of my friends had and I already felt I was at a disadvantage as a freshman,” she said. But as a member of the University Scholars program, which encourages stewardship and leadership in addition to academic dedication, Janki made a smooth adjustment to campus life and her confidence grew by leaps and bounds. Without prior research experience, Janki joined International Genetically…

Scientists have traced the emergence of the modern dog to the domestication of a population of gray wolves that took place in Europe between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago. By analyzing the DNA of two prehistoric dogs from Germany, an international research team led by Krishna R. Veeramah, PhD, Assistant Professor of Ecology & Evolution in the College of Arts & Sciences at Stony Brook University, has determined that their genomes were the probable ancestors of modern European dogs. The finding was published in Nature Communications. Dogs were the first animal to be domesticated by humans. The oldest dog fossils that can…

Michael Salerno, a third year Biomedical Engineering PhD student, was awarded the 2017-2018 STEM Chateaubriand Fellowship, a grant offered by the Embassy of France in the U.S. to support outstanding PhD students from American universities to conduct research in France for up to nine months. As part of the Chateaubriand Fellowship, Salerno will be supported to go to France for nine months on a joint project:  Integrating Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Functional Ultrasound (fUS) in the behaving rat, to study the relationships between blood flow and neurochemistry during various behaviors. “Mike’s break-through research aims to advance a new imaging modality that…

Genetics PhD candidate Alex Bott is ready to take his place in the front ranks of the fight against cancer, and he has the grants to prove it. This past year, Bott was recognized with two prestigious and highly competitive awards from the National Institutes of Health (NIH): the F31 (Predoctoral Individual National Research Service Award) and the newly-established F99/K00 — the Predoctoral to Postdoctoral Fellow Transition Award, which is designed to encourage and retain outstanding graduate students who have demonstrated potential to pursue careers as independent cancer researchers. Bott’s research focuses on Myc, a regulator gene amplified in a wide range of cancers, particularly breast cancer.…

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