Browsing: Research

Stony Brook University’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and School of Medicine have embarked on an ambitious journey to advance engineering-driven medicine. Dubbed by some as the “third revolution in medicine,” convergence science integrates medicine and engineering to confront some of the big unanswered questions in healthcare, and enables technologies that seek to revolutionize how we deliver healthcare. Together with the Stony Brook University Cancer Center, the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and School of Medicine convened a gathering of clinicians, scientists and engineers to share ideas and stimulate creative collaboration aimed at some of the toughest challenges…

Scientists have yet to understand and explain how life’s informational molecules – proteins and DNA and RNA – arose from simpler chemicals when life on earth emerged some four billion years ago. Now a research team from the Stony Brook University Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory believe they have the answer. They developed a computational model explaining how certain molecules fold and bind together to grow longer and more complex, leading from simple chemicals to primitive biological molecules. The findings are reported early online in PNAS. Previously scientists learned that the early…

Despite centuries of studying the atom and the particles within it, the mysteries of matter continue to elude scientists. What are we really made of? To solve such an enigma and better understand the building blocks of our universe, Stony Brook University and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have partnered to establish the Center for Frontiers of Nuclear Science, bolstered by a new $5 million grant from the Simons Foundation. “The Center for Frontiers in Nuclear Science will bring us closer to understanding our universe in ways in which it has never before been possible,”…

Jason Trelewicz received the prestigious Early Career Research award from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. He will receive $750K over five years to develop his project,  “Enhancing the Performance of Plasma-facing Materials Through Solute-stabilized Nanostructured Tungsten Alloys.” The Department of Energy Early Career Research Program supports the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists in their early careers. To be eligible, researchers must be untenured, tenure-track assistant or associate professor at a U.S. academic institution, and received a PhD within the last 10 years. “The DOE Early Career award is among the most distinguished honors a…

Researchers from Stony Brook University, Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have discovered new effects of an important method for modulating semiconductors. The method, which works by creating open spaces or “vacancies” in a material’s structure, enables scientists to tune the electronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (SCNCs) — semiconductor particles that are smaller than 100 nanometers. This finding will advance the development of new technologies like smart windows, which can change opaqueness on demand. Anatoly Frenkel, a professor in Stony Brook’s Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, holds…

The U.S. has a population of more than 50 million seniors for the first time in history. As that number climbs, Stony Brook University has received a three-year $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation to fund research that uses brain imaging data to understand how the nutrition of brain neurons affects cognition in aging humans. The research could provide a critical first step toward personalized medicine in neurology for aging patients. The project, “Protecting the Aging Brain: Self-Organizing Networks and Multi-Scale Dynamics Under Energy Constraints,” is led by Lilianne R. Mujica-Parodi, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook…

When Dominique Spiegowski ’18 got the opportunity to do hands-on chemistry research, she made the most of it. Last summer, she commuted nearly 2 hours each way from Ridgewood, Queens, just so that she could put in the hours necessary to advance her project:  optimizing the synthesis of hydroxyl amines for use in photoredox reactions to yield various perfluoroalkoxylated heteroarenes. When Dominique learned that she had been accepted to the 2017 URECA summer program and would be able to devote herself to research full-time, she was thrilled. A biology major with a minor in chemistry, Dominique first contacted Prof. Ming-Yu Ngai…

Three Stony Brook faculty members led a four-week computer science and informatics summer program for high school students. Fusheng Wang, Departments of Computer Science (CS) and Biomedical Informatics BMI), Daifeng Wang (BMI) and Xiaojun Bi (CS) joined forces for the inaugural program, Computer Science and Informatics Research Experience (CSIRE) for K-12 students, held from July 5 through August 4. Their motivation for the program was to provide an opportunity for K-12 outreach in the fields of computer science and informatics with a particular emphasis on research opportunities for students. Originally the program was outlined in Fusheng Wang’s National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER…

The discovery in Kenya of a remarkably complete fossil ape skull reveals what the common ancestor of all living apes and humans may have looked like. The find, announced in the scientific journal Nature on August 10th, belongs to an infant that lived about 13 million years ago. The research was done by an international team led by Isaiah Nengo of the Stony Brook University-affiliated Turkana Basin Institute, Stony Brook University, and De Anza College, U.S.A. Among living primates, humans are most closely related to the apes, including chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans and gibbons. Our common ancestor with chimpanzees lived in Africa 6 to 7…

Researchers in the Departments of Computer Science, and Applied Mathematics and Statistics awarded $449k through the National Science Foundation’s NeTS program. Even for the personal smartphone or home computer user there is no avoiding the use of cloud computing. Cloud computing is low in cost, easily available, and offers access to useful services that would otherwise be out of reach. Services such as Netflix, Amazon Fire, and Expedia are only some of the popular online services being hosted on the cloud. On the backend, dynamic applications in the cloud are more lucrative if their deployments grow through dynamic capacity provisioning.…

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