Browsing: Research

Eric Brouzes, an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation CBET division entitled, “Physical Principles of Magnetic Extraction from Microfluidic Droplets.” This three-year, $300K award will study the extraction of magnetic beads from microfluidic droplets with the translational goal of developing an efficient way to access genetic information of single cells at high speed. These droplets are extremely stable, they act as capsules that do not merge with each other unless directed, and can be precisely controlled at high speed. That approach has proven beneficial in many applications, such…

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded Joel Saltz, MD, together with and a team of researchers from the University of Arkansas and Emory University, a $8M grant over the next five years to develop an integrated Radiology/Pathology/”omics” data repository that will enable team science research with the ultimate goal of developing ways of steering cancer treatment. This effort will develop and deploy tools to create large collections of well-curated data for algorithm testing and validation. “Cancer is a complex multifactorial disease state and the ability to anticipate and steer treatment results will require information synthesis across multiple scales from the…

The Siemens Competition — the nation’s premier competition in math, science and technology for high school students — has announced its semifinalists for this year. Out of 491 national semifinalists, 55 students were mentored by Stony Brook faculty; 12 of those were named regional finalists and will continue on to compete in November. Each year, students submit innovative individual and team research projects to regional and national levels of competition as they vie for college scholarships ranging from $1,000 up to $100,000. This year for the first time, a new prize structure guarantees that national finalists will receive a minimum of $25,000. The…

For decades, statistical agencies such as the United Nations, the U.S. Census Bureau and Eurostat have provided data and analyses of population aging, assuming that the only characteristic that was relevant to the study of population aging was chronological age. But this is not the case. Sixty-five-year-olds today have longer remaining life expectancies and score higher on tests of cognitive functioning than 65-year-olds in the past. Data on population aging that ignore the changing characteristics of people produce a distorted picture of the extent of population aging in the future. Warren Sanderson, a professor in the Department of Economics at Stony Brook…

The 2017 “22 under 22 Most Inspiring College Women” list from hercampus.com has been released, and it features Ann Lin, a senior in the Stony Brook University Honors College double majoring in Biochemistry and Economics. In Spring 2017 Lin was recognized nationally as a Goldwater Scholar and she has drawn attention as a rising star at scientific meetings and hackathons. Lin won an Outstanding Presentation award at the Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine Undergraduate Research Symposium in the category of Cancer Biology/Immunology. She has been in the spotlight at CalTech, where she was awarded “Best Social Hack” for the creation of a web platform that helps…

Penguins are noisy, as any visitor to an aquarium knows. Penguins may be noisy in others ways too, according to a new study published in Nature Communications. Scientists have long used Adélie penguin populations to monitor the health of the Southern Ocean and to understand how major factors such as fishing and climate change impact the oceans and the animals that rely on them. Now an extensive analysis of all known data on Adélie penguin populations over the last 35 years has found that only a small fraction of year-to-year changes in Adélie penguin populations can be attributed to measurable factors such…

Professor Shu Jia, in the Department of Biomedical Engineering of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and the School of Medicine, received a $1.97M, five year Maximizing Investigators’ Resource Award (MIRA) from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The goal of MIRA is to increase the efficiency of NIGMS funding by providing investigators with stability and flexibility to enhance productivity and foster cutting edge scientific breakthroughs. Jia’s research, “Exploring Single-Molecule Biophotonics for Ultrahigh-Resolution Spatiotemporal-Multiplexed Optical Microscopy” focuses on new technological developments to understand the distribution and interactions of molecules in…

A joint Stony Brook-BNL research team has found a way to capture the details of chemistry’s elaborate choreography as it happens. Led by Anatoly Frenkel, a professor in Stony Brook University’s Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Department who has a joint appointment with Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Chemistry Division, the team relied on computers that have learned to recognize the steps in a complex dance of atoms involved in chemical reactions. The findings should help them improve the performance of catalysts to drive reactions toward desired products faster. The method—developed by an interdisciplinary team of chemists, computational scientists, and physicists at…

“When you’re in a class, you just see all this information put on a board,” says undergraduate researcher Justin Bell ’18. “Your job is to be a sponge and soak it all up. But research gave me a deeper appreciation for how much work and time and energy went into each of those discoveries.” Bell, a biology major in the University Scholars Program,  is the recipient of this year’s Chhabra-URECA Fellowship, an honor administered through Undergraduate Research and Creative Acctivities (URECA) at Stony Brook. The award, which annually recognizes an undergraduate researcher who has a passion and talent for science, provided support…

A team of researchers in the Department of Computer Science was recently awarded $3.5M by the Office of Naval Research to support “debloating,” a process that could help guard against security breaches that threaten the privacy and integrity of personal data. Debloating is the process of removing and streamlining code, thus enhancing software performance as well as security. As part of the researchers’ debloating project, titled “Multi-layer Software Transformation for Attack Surface Reduction and Shielding,” Professors R. Sekar and Michalis Polychronakis will leverage recent advances they have made in binary code analysis and transformation to remove code bloat and tighten security of today’s…

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