Browsing: Research

Joseph Sweeney ’17 loves a good challenge — so much so, that it was a key factor in his decision to attend Stony Brook. “I knew that many of the science courses would be difficult and would push me to my greatest potential,” Joseph says. For Joseph, meeting challenges is a way of life. His personal struggle with diet and weight shaped his career aspirations, leading him on the path to becoming a physician-scientist, specializing in diabetes and obesity. His own research guided him as he gained control over his diet, replacing unhealthful foods with better choices. He added strength training and other forms of exercise,…

Hallmarks of cancer progression are uncontrolled proliferation (division) of cancer cells and invasive behavior, leading to the spread of tumor cells throughout the body. Now two Stony Brook University cell biologists, David Matus, PhD, and Benjamin Martin, PhD, have discovered that cell division and invasion are mutually exclusive behaviors. For this novel finding, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has awarded the researchers with the 2017 Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award and a two-year grant of $300,000, followed by another renewable grant of $300,000 for an additional two years to further advance their work. “Cells can’t divide and invade at the same time, and most…

Four scholars are competing for the 2017 Discovery Prize, a $200,000 award given to a Stony Brook University faculty member in the STEM disciplines whose research project embraces risk and innovation and embodies the potential of discovery-driven research. The Discovery Prize was established in 2013 with a generous donation from the Stony Brook Foundation’s Board of Trustees as a way to advance pioneering scientific breakthroughs. In keeping with the University’s goal of supporting early-career faculty, eligibility is open to faculty members who have a tenure-track assistant professor appointment or are no more than five years beyond tenure and promotion at the…

Several Stony Brook University faculty have helped 23 high school students become scholars in the 2017 Regeneron Science Talent Search (formerly, Intel STS Competition), the oldest and most prestigious pre-college science competition in the U.S. Each scholar receives a $2,000 award from Regeneron with an additional $2,000 going to his or her school. The competition overall awards $3.1 million to provide the opportunities and resources that students need to become the next generation of inventors, entrepreneurs and STEM leaders. Only 300 students are announced as scholars each year. From this select pool, 40 finalists will be announced on January 24, 2017, and then…

It will take at least eight million years to restore species recently lost to extinction, according to research on New World leaf-nosed bats by Stony Brook’s Liliana Dávalos. In the Caribbean alone, more than half of the mammal species went extinct after human colonization. Bats are the most diverse group of surviving mammals. Can nature restore the numbers of species on islands to levels that existed before human arrival? How long would it take for nature to regain this lost mammal diversity? To answer these questions, a research team led by Luis Valente at the Berlin Natural History Museum (Germany) and…

Stony Brook University (SBU) has received a three-year grant for more than $400,000 from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to expand the University’s decades long commitment to engage underrepresented minorities in the geosciences. The grant will be used to develop the Stony Brook GeoPATH-IMPACT program, which will cultivate STEM education and pathways into the geosciences to increase underrepresented student involvement and experience from high school through community college to 4-year institutions. Led by Professor Brian Colle from Stony Brook’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS), this project will: (1) Provide a research experience for community college (CC) students interested in the…

Nusnin Akter, a Materials Science and Chemical Engineering graduate student, won the first place poster award for her research, “2D-Zeolite for the Argon Trap,” at the fifth annual Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) Early Career Researcher Symposium, presented by the Association of Students and Postdocs at BNL on December 13. This symposium is a showcase of the pioneering research that is performed by graduate students and postdocs at BNL. Akter is mentored by Stony Brook University Professor Taejin Kim and Brookhaven National Lab’s Jorge Anibal Boscoboinik, “One of the things I dreamed of as I planned for my graduate studies was to…

Lynn Lewis-Bevan ’17 has some advice for freshmen feeling pressured to declare a major — don’t. Lynn, who credits her father with encouraging her to “see the science behind everything,” was introduced to a Jane Goodall documentary in third grade and she was hooked on studying the natural world. Initially, she wanted to become a veterinarian but surrendered that dream because she didn’t want to euthanize animals. She almost gave up her science dreams because she was advised by administrators in her North Carolina high school, who told her that they didn’t see her doing well in science. The reason?…

A team of scientists led by Stony Brook University’s Jin Wang, a Professor of Chemistry and Physics, and Physics graduate student Zhedong Zhang, has announced a discovery that could help make sustainable solar energy a reality. The team discovered a mechanism in the energy transfer process of photosynthesis (for the pigment-protein complex) that illustrates quantitatively the maintenance of long-survived quantum coherence. The role of quantum coherence – when subatomic particles cooperate reflecting a form of harmony in the microscopic world – is important to understanding energy transfer in photosynthesis. Recently, a new phenomenon with quantum coherence puzzled many scientists – that…

Stony Brook University received a $150,000 planning grant from the National Science Foundation to support a national program that will create science programming for educators. The funding was awarded to the National Center for Science and Civic Engagement (NCSCE), a research center within Stony Brook’s Department of Technology and Society, in partnership with the National Informal STEM Education Network (NISE Net), a community of educators and scientists dedicated to fostering public awareness, engagement and understanding of current STEM topics. Eliza Jane Reilly, NCSCE deputy executive director for programs and co-principal investigator of the grant, says that the funding will foster new…

1 2 3 39