Browsing: Research

Department of Computer Science Professor Long Lu has received a grant from the U.S. Army Research Office for his latest work on web-mobile integration and security. The professor’s research aims to develop tools and techniques that will enable these integrations to be more secure, and eventually create hardware-assisted protection that will be used in situations involving high-level sensitive information. Despite the fact that web-mobile integration is one of the most widely used and quickly growing models, there have been very few studies done on its security implications. That lack of comprehensive understanding has thus far made it very difficult to…

PhD student Qiyuan Wu has received the 2017 Graduate Student Award in Environmental Chemistry from the American Chemical Society (ACS). As the world’s largest scientific society, the ACS awards up to 20 students each year who show promise in research and the potential to make an impact in the field of environmental chemistry. This is Wu’s third award from the ACS, and his achievements highlight the continued excellence in environmental research taking place at Stony Brook’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “Qiyuan developed his research projects independently, exhibiting creativity, thoughtfulness and hard work,” said Alexander Orlov, Associate Professor of Materials Science…

As she completes the finishing touches on her honors thesis, Diana Hernandez remarks: “It’s the first big paper that I’ve ever done like this. And it was a really incredible experience!” On track to graduate with honors in Comparative Literature in May 2017, Diana is completing an honors thesis that focuses on a 1933 work written by Salvadoran author Salarrué called Cuentos de Barro (Tales of Clay), a collection of folktales about the everyday lives of El Savador’s “campesinos” or impoverished farmers. Working under the mentorship of Professor Timothy August of the Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature, Diana…

At Stony Brook University, Matthew Henninger ’16 took great risks and found big rewards. Matthew, who grew up in Farmingville, only 20 minutes away from the University, moved to Brookfield, Connecticut with his family when he was eight years old. He grew to love the relative seclusion and natural beauty of his new surroundings and vowed he would never return to densely populated central Suffolk County. His academic interests, however, lured him back. “The friends I remained close to on Long Island who attended Stony Brook raved about the immense opportunities and impeccable education they were getting there,” he says. “At…

When Nicole Bono was 36 weeks pregnant with her son, Vincent, a routine sonogram delivered jarring news. Vincent’s skull was not developing normally. He was diagnosed with a metopic synostosis, a cranial developmental disorder that affects about one in every 15,000 babies. Some of the bones in Vincent’s skull had fused together prematurely, giving the skull a triangular appearance and creating the possibility for less-than-optimal brain development down the road. Uncorrected metopic synostosis can lead to developmental delays, cognitive impairment, eye movement disorders and seizures. Doctors had told the Bonos that the condition might resolve itself after birth. But when…

Professor Ellen Pikitch, executive director of the Institute for Ocean Conservation Science in the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at Stony Brook University, is part of a research team led by Stanford University, that published its perspective piece, “Opportunity for Marine Fisheries Reform in China,” in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. As global fish stocks continue to decline, this study found that China’s most recent fisheries conservation plan can achieve a real shift in marine fisheries management, but only if the Chinese government embraces major institutional reform. The researchers examined…

Joseph Sweeney ’17 loves a good challenge — so much so, that it was a key factor in his decision to attend Stony Brook. “I knew that many of the science courses would be difficult and would push me to my greatest potential,” Joseph says. For Joseph, meeting challenges is a way of life. His personal struggle with diet and weight shaped his career aspirations, leading him on the path to becoming a physician-scientist, specializing in diabetes and obesity. His own research guided him as he gained control over his diet, replacing unhealthful foods with better choices. He added strength training and other forms of exercise,…

Hallmarks of cancer progression are uncontrolled proliferation (division) of cancer cells and invasive behavior, leading to the spread of tumor cells throughout the body. Now two Stony Brook University cell biologists, David Matus, PhD, and Benjamin Martin, PhD, have discovered that cell division and invasion are mutually exclusive behaviors. For this novel finding, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has awarded the researchers with the 2017 Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award and a two-year grant of $300,000, followed by another renewable grant of $300,000 for an additional two years to further advance their work. “Cells can’t divide and invade at the same time, and most…

NOTE: Due to the weather, this event was cancelled on February 9 and will be rescheduled soon. Four scholars are competing for the 2017 Discovery Prize, a $200,000 award given to a Stony Brook University faculty member in the STEM disciplines whose research project embraces risk and innovation and embodies the potential of discovery-driven research. The Discovery Prize was established in 2013 with a generous donation from the Stony Brook Foundation’s Board of Trustees as a way to advance pioneering scientific breakthroughs. In keeping with the University’s goal of supporting early-career faculty, eligibility is open to faculty members who have a…

Several Stony Brook University faculty have helped 23 high school students become scholars in the 2017 Regeneron Science Talent Search (formerly, Intel STS Competition), the oldest and most prestigious pre-college science competition in the U.S. Each scholar receives a $2,000 award from Regeneron with an additional $2,000 going to his or her school. The competition overall awards $3.1 million to provide the opportunities and resources that students need to become the next generation of inventors, entrepreneurs and STEM leaders. Only 300 students are announced as scholars each year. From this select pool, 40 finalists will be announced on January 24, 2017, and then…

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