Browsing: Research

A team of researchers in the Department of Computer Science was recently awarded $3.5M by the Office of Naval Research to support “debloating,” a process that could help guard against security breaches that threaten the privacy and integrity of personal data. Debloating is the process of removing and streamlining code, thus enhancing software performance as well as security. As part of the researchers’ debloating project, titled “Multi-layer Software Transformation for Attack Surface Reduction and Shielding,” Professors R. Sekar and Michalis Polychronakis will leverage recent advances they have made in binary code analysis and transformation to remove code bloat and tighten security of today’s…

As the Cassini spacecraft plunged into Saturn, Carolyn Porco ’74,  leader of the Cassini imaging science team, eulogized the historic mission on her blog: The end is now upon us. Within hours of the posting of this entry, Cassini will have burned up in the atmosphere of Saturn … a kiloton explosion, spread out against the sky in a pyrrhic display of light and fire, a dazzling flash to signal the dying essence of a lone emissary from another world. As if the myths of old had foretold the future, the great patriarch will consume his child. At that point,…

In 2017, Stony Brook graduate student and ethnomusicologist Jay Loomis and assistant professor of computer science Roy Shilkrot teamed up to secure a grant to create 3D printed replicas of ancient wind instruments. The goal? To give museum-goers an opportunity to interact with rare instruments rather than merely viewing them through a glass enclosure. Loomis had been interested in wind instruments since he was a boy in Wisconsin, when he was struck deeply by flute music wafting from his car radio. After he moved to Long Island, his thirst for playing dovetailed with an insatiable curiosity about indigenous musical instruments. He hoped…

Addressing the mental health needs of astronauts on long-duration space missions could soon become easier via an innovative e-tool now entering clinical trials. Adam Gonzalez, Assistant Professor in the Department of Psychiatry at Stony Brook University will lead the trial, designed to inform the delivery of mental health treatments for astronauts. The NASA-funded study involves “astronaut-like” individuals and is being developed in conjunction with researchers from the Black Dog Institute in Australia. In 2015, Gonzalez, Founding Director of the Mind Body Clinical Research Center at Stony Brook, received a four-year $1 million grant from NASA for the research to evaluate e-mental health tools for astronauts. The…

Ancient DNA recovered from fossils is a valuable tool to study evolution and anthropology. Yet fossil DNA has not been found yet in any part of Africa, where it’s destroyed by extreme heat and humidity. In a potential first step at overcoming this hurdle, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and the Stony Brook University-affiliated Turkana Basin Institute. have discovered a new kind of glycan — a type of sugar chain — that survives even in a 4 million-year-old animal fossil from Kenya, under conditions where ancient DNA does not. While ancient fossils from hominins are…

NASA recently joined forces with Stony Brook University students and researchers to venture onto other-worldly terrain in the New Mexico desert as part of a program designed to prepare future astronauts for their potential journeys into space — to the moon and even Mars. A small group of Stony Brook journalism students, research faculty and NASA experts collaborated on this mission through a program called RIS4E (Remote, In Situ and Synchrotron Studies for Science and Exploration). RIS4E is a five-year, $5.5-million project led by Stony Brook faculty and packed with out-of-this-world lab and field research, including the exploration of environments…

“For most of my life, I could never watch scary movies; I’ve always hated them,” says undergraduate researcher Ashley Barry ’18.  “I think it’s so funny that I ended up actually choosing this area to work on for my project.” Ashley, a double major in English and Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies and a participant in the 2017 URECA summer research program., has spent the summer watching scary movies, reading theory, and immersing herself in scholarly research for her senior thesis project on: “Feminine Fear: Affect Theory and Horror Films in the Twenty-first Century.” The project developed out of a paper Ashley wrote for…

Danny Bluestein, a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been elected a fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES). His award-winning work tackles the dynamics of flow and cellular transport in blood recirculating devices and the diseased cardiovascular system. He is also director of the Biofluids Research Group at Stony Brook University. BMES fellows demonstrate exceptional achievements and experience in the field of biomedical engineering and are encouraged to continue to pursue leadership within the society and to further improve the future of BMES and biomedical engineering. “Professor Bluestein’s work — combining in silico computer simulations with benchtop lab testing — exemplifies…

Kellon Belfon has always loved science, but the wet-lab experience was not for him. Stony Brook University provides an alternative — computational research — and that research takes place at the Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology on campus. “Computational research involves using mathematical models to simulate the behavior of atoms,” Kellon said. “We do not necessarily deal with harmful chemicals but instead simulate them.” A PhD student in Stony Brook’s Department of Chemistry, Kellon recently received a prestigious ACM-SIGHPC/Intel Computational and Data Science Fellowship. With the fellowship comes a $15,000 stipend, ACM membership, a travel grant to attend…

Two Stony Brook University Department of Physics and Astronomy faculty in the College of Arts and Sciences recently received the Department of Energy (DOE) Early Career Award for their individual research projects related to the discovery of dark energy and dark matter.   Assistant Professor Anja von der Linden was awarded for her project, “Towards Precision Cluster Cosmology with Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)”; Assistant Professor Marilena Loverde, also appointed in the Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics,  was awarded for “Discovering Dark Energy, Dark Matter, and Neutrino Properties with Cosmic Structure.”  Each will receive $750,000 over five years to develop…

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