Browsing: Research

Jasmine Garani’s research is out of this world. The astronomy and physics double major ’18 was selected from a field of applicants this summer to study exoplanets, which are planets outside of our solar system. Jasmine, who hails from Sharon, Massachusetts, is earning a stipend while working with her mentors, astronomer Franck Marchis and postdoctoral fellow Eric Nielsen, as part of the National Science Foundation’s Research Experiences for Undergraduates at the SETI Institute in California’s Silicon Valley. SETI stands for Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence. Nielsen took pictures of stars with the Keck telescope a few years ago and Jasmine is…

Biology Student Finds a Lab That Makes a Difference in Peoples’ Lives Biology major Louis Susca ’16 was looking for a lab with an interpersonal focus. He found it in Stony Brook’s Center For Dance, Movement and Somatic Learning, where Founding Director Amy Yopp Sullivan leads a workshop designed to enhance the lives of Parkinson’s patients.  Every week during the academic year, Susca assists as a small group of patients experience the benefits of movement, dance and creative thinking. For Susca, studying neurological science means more than just hitting the books. The workshop has taught him the importance of a…

When Rima Madan joined the Madagascar Study Abroad program the summer after her freshman year, she had yet to discover how that one experience would transform the rest of her undergraduate education. “It was amazing because the rainforest became a classroom,” explains Rima, a Biology and Anthropology double-major in the Honors College. The hands-on learning, the exposure to tropical field biology, and the passion for conservation work she developed, were only part of it. Rima adds: “Research made material from my biology and anthropology classes come to life.” Rima’s Study Abroad experience also gave her the chance to do an…

A team of international scientists led by Stony Brook University researchers have created an ultra-fast, computerized way to model protein interactions, potentially helping to speed needed drugs to market. Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) are the basis of cellular functions, and when these processes are compromised diseases such as cancer emerge. For years scientists have tried with mixed success to map out PPIs to understand cellular processes. Now researchers led by Stony Brook’s Dima Kozakov have outlined a method that could pave the way to designing new drugs that prevent problematic protein interactions that lead to disease. The findings are published in the early online…

Millions of years from now, an aspiring anthropology student may brush the dust off a gleaming gold artifact we call the Hubbard Medal, and wonder to whom it belonged. But today, we know the most recently minted Hubbard Medal belongs to world-renowned paleoanthropologist Meave Leakey, research professor in Stony Brook University’s Department of Anthropology. Meave is also director of field research at the Turkana Basin Institute in Kenya, a unique nonprofit initiative co-founded by the Leakey family and Stony Brook to drive research at one of the best locations on Earth for studying the origins of humankind. The National Geographic…

Diamond beam monitors could form the basis of the next generation of radiation therapy for cancer, according to a national team of researchers led by Stony Brook’s Erik Muller, PhD. Muller, Senior Research Scientist and Adjunct Professor, Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, is developing high-speed synthetic diamond beam monitors that detect proton and carbon ion beams used for cancer radiation therapy. The research team also includes scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory. The technology, supported by a two-year $500,000 grant from the High Energy Physics Section of the Department of Energy, is designed to provide…

After the success of last year’s inaugural Advances in Functional Materials (AFM) Conference at Stony Brook University, the second annual International AFM Conference will be held at the International Convention Center in South Korea from August 8 through August 11. Tae Jin Kim, assistant professor in the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering at Stony Brook University, is chair and co-organizer of the 2016 AFM Conference. “This event will present up-to-date research and results in the field of functional materials,” he said. “The conference will provide an opportunity for delegates from around the world to share their findings and exchange…

By studying daily activity levels and heart rate patterns of those who suffer from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS), Stony Brook scientists are looking  to achieve a better understanding of the complex and baffling condition. Fred Friedberg, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychiatry at Stony Brook University School of Medicine, has received a four-year $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to determine if heart rate fluctuations in combination with certain daily activity patterns can be used to predict or prevent relapse in people with CFS. According to Dr. Friedberg, also the President of the International Association for Chronic Fatigue Syndrome/Myalgic Encephalomyelitis, CFS…

Empowered with NIH grants totaling more than $6 million, Maurizio Del Poeta, MD, a professor in the Department of Molecular Genetics & Microbiology at Stony Brook University, expects to change the landscape of treatment against fungal infections with new approaches based on his laboratory research and collaborative work with fungal experts worldwide. Systemic fungal infections cause more than one million deaths annually, and treatments against these infections are often not effective due to drug resistance or toxicity. The funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) recognize the widespread need for better antifungal treatments and the promise of Dr. Del Poeta’s…

The New York State Center for Clean Water Technology at Stony Brook University has developed a potential replacement for Long Island cesspools that can remove high amounts of nitrogen — the primary cause of local water quality degradation — from household wastewater. The system incorporates simple design with locally sourced, natural materials to position it as an economically viable alternative for high-performance onsite wastewater treatment, a crucial infrastructure need for restoring Long Island water quality. Pilot installations of the system are underway at a test center and are scheduled to begin locally by early fall as part of the Suffolk County Department…

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