Browsing: Research

Speaking at the Stars of Stony Brook Gala on April 19, former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. offered inspiring words about the ongoing battle to find a cancer cure. He revealed his sole regret in not becoming President of the United States, emphasized the “urgency of now” in finding new ways to combat the disease, and offered his vision for the future of cancer research. View the 10 most inspiring moments from his speech:

Rethinking mobile security in today’s app-as-a-platform environment is both a challenge and a labor of love for Long Lu, who has received a $500,000 National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award for his research in this area. For Dr. Lu, an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, the honor represents his fourth NSF award and eighth research grant, securing him more than $3 million in research dollars over his career. “The NSF CAREER award is one of the highest honors an ‘early career’ faculty member can achieve nationally, and directly impacts the advancement of promising…

The Alan Alda Center for Communicating Science at Stony Brook University, along with the Office of the Provost and Office of Research, hosted colleagues and partners in STEM education and research on April 20 at the Charles B. Wang Center for a collaborative discussion with Carlos Moedas, the European Commissioner of Research, Science, and Innovation. Commissioner Moedas presented opportunities for Stony Brook University, Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and Brookhaven National Laboratory to engage more directly with European Union research institutions. Actor Alan Alda, a visiting professor in Stony Brook’s School of Journalism and founder of the Center for Communicating Science,…

Stony Brook postdoc receives $200,000 to unravel mysteries of movement within molecules  How do electrons move within molecules? Thomas Allison, an assistant professor in the Departments of Chemistry and Physics at Stony Brook University, posed this fundamental question on the way to winning the 2017 Discovery Prize. In a presentation delivered April 13 at the Charles B. Wang Center Theatre, Allison convinced a panel of three distinguished judges that his project deserved a $200,000 cash prize to help fund his postdoctoral research. The award will finance equipment that will help scientists see how molecules move and behave in real time. The winner was…

One oceanic consequence of climate change is well underway, and it’s likely already having a negative impact on human health, according to a new study led by a professor at Stony Brook’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS). “This study demonstrates that the global warming that has already occurred is now impacting human health and our oceans,” Professor Christopher Gobler said. “An important implication of the study is that carbon emission and climate change-related policy decisions made today are likely to have important consequences for the fate of our future oceans, including the spread and intensification of toxic algal blooms.”…

Humans are visual creatures: our brain processes images 60,000 times faster than text, and 90 percent of information sent to the brain is visual. Visualization is becoming increasingly useful in the era of big data, in which we are generating so much data at such high rates that we cannot keep up with making sense of it all. In particular, visual analytics—a research discipline that combines automated data analysis with interactive visualizations—has emerged as a promising approach to dealing with this information overload. “Visual analytics provides a bridge between advanced computational capabilities and human knowledge and judgment,” said Wei Xu,…

Nearly 16 years have passed since the 9/11 World Trade Center attacks, but emergency responders and other victims continue to suffer health consequences. That’s why the Stony Brook University WTC Wellness Program, which helps to track and serve nearly 10,000 patients affected by the tragedy, has received a new five-year federal grant totaling more than $60 million. Awarded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH), the grant comes at a time when the WTC Wellness Program continues to expand its medical services to patients and is relocating later this month to a larger clinical space in Stony Brook Medicine’s new specialty…

Researchers from the Department of Computer Science at Stony Brook University developed a digital assistant app that does not compromise privacy and answers the question, how can we provide personalized news recommendations without sharing sensitive data with the provider? Digital personal assistants have the ability to gear the content of an app or service to your specific likes and dislikes, such as Google News. However, they need a lot of sensitive data about you to be effective. Assistant Professors Aruna Balasubramanian and Niranjan Balasubramanian, along with former graduate students Shashank Jain (Microsoft) and Vivek Tiwari (LinkedIn), developed an app that…

“Research isn’t about answers; it’s about questions,” says Evelyn Kandov ’17. “Having the chance to try to answer them and figure things out — that’s the exciting part,” she adds. Evelyn’s academic career exemplifies the unique opportunities for hands-on, high-level research available to Stony Brook undergraduates. In January 2016, she Evelyn joined the laboratory of Dr. Berhane Ghebrehiwet, a Professor of Medicine and Pathology in the SBU School of Medicine. She credits this placement as crucial to her development as a scientist. “What drew me to him the most was his mentorship,” she says. “He is such an amazing mentor.” Evelyn is on track to…

Thanks to a Stony Brook University-led invention, researchers can model protein interactions on their desktops. A research team led through the Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology has created a user-friendly automated computer server that calculates complex computations of modeling protein interactions with a handful of clicks from a home computer. The resource, available to researchers around the world, is detailed in a paper published in Nature Protocols. Understanding the rules by which proteins interact enables researchers to design new interactions. For example, modeling interactions of special proteins called antibodies with other molecules may enable pharmacology researchers to develop new and better…

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