Browsing: Research

A consortium of psychiatrists and psychologists from universities around the world, co-led by Stony Brook University, University of Minnesota and University of Notre Dame researchers, has proposed a new approach to diagnosing mental disorders. The approach, articulated in a paper published in the Journal of Abnormal Psychology, is a classification system of a wide range of psychiatric problems based on scientific evidence, illness symptoms and impaired functioning. The diagnostic system addresses fundamental shortcomings of the fifth edition (2013) of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), the clinicians’ and researchers’ guidebook to mental illnesses. Diagnosis of mental illness is important…

Tiny strands of fungi weave through the roots of an estimated nine out of 10 plants on Earth, an underground symbiosis in which the plant gives the fungus pre-made sugars and the fungus sends the plant basic nutrients in return. Scientists are interested in enhancing this mechanism as a way to help plants grow on nutrient-poor lands. Their success could lead to increased production of plant-based biofuels without having to compete with food crops for fertile farmland. “When fungus grows within the plant’s root system, it produces hair-like extensions all throughout the soil. These are thinner than the root hairs…

Three faculty members from the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences have received Google Faculty Research Awards, one-year awards given to support the work of world-class faculty members at top universities around the world. This honor highlights Stony Brook’s competitive presence among other top engineering universities on Google’s 2017 winners list, which includes MIT, Stanford University and University of California – Berkeley. Each year, Google announces an open call for PhD students and faculty at accredited Universities to submit proposals on computer science-related topics. Those chosen gain the opportunity to work hand-in-hand with Google researchers and engineers to develop their research.…

Revolutionizing the quality, quantity and speed of digital research, Stony Brook University became the first higher education institution in New York State to offer a 100 gigabit-per-second (Gbps) connection to the Internet2 Research Network on March 10, 2017. “This connection supports Stony Brook’s regional leadership position in high-performance computing, while advancing our goal as a top public research university to educate and train future generations of scientists,” said President Samuel L. Stanley, Jr. “I’m looking forward to the many new possibilities this connection will offer for interdisciplinary collaboration, an essential element behind the expansion of our expertise and our success…

A Stony Brook University-led study on the history and spelling of English suffixes demonstrates that the spelling of English words is more orderly and self-organized than linguistics have previously thought. The finding, details of which are published in the journal Language, is an indication that the self-organization of English occurred even though the language has never been regulated or governed through the centuries. Unlike France, Italy and other countries where national academies oversee the written language, no English-speaking country has such an academy. Yet, in the paper, “Self-Organization in the Spelling of English Suffixes: The Emergence of Culture out of Anarchy,” the research…

As lead institution for the U.S. ATLAS collaboration, Stony Brook University has received additional National Science Foundation (NSF) funding toward the project. This recent $5.4M award for U.S. ATLAS Operations: Discovery and Measurement at the Energy Frontier will stimulate development of a scientific and technically educated workforce, advancing the multidisciplinary application of technology and the popularization and dissemination of science to the general public. Stony Brook Physics Professor John Hobbs is principal investigator for U.S. NSF operations of ATLAS, which has received a total amount of over $54M in funding to date. This ongoing project provides the U.S. contribution to the international ATLAS experiment at…

Nusnin Akter, a PhD student in the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, won the Richard J. Kokes Award sponsored by the North American Catalysis Society and administered by the North American Meetings (NAM) organization. The competitive Kokes Award encourages students to attend and participate in the biennial NAM conference, at which Akter will present her work in Denver, Colorado, this June. Nusnin Akter, mentored by Assistant Professor Taejin Kim from Stony Brook and Jorge Anibal Boscoboinik from Brookhaven National Lab, has been investigating heterogeneous catalysts to understand the relationship between molecular/electronic catalyst structure and catalytic activity for the…

Rob Patro, an assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science in Stony Brook’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, leads a group of computational biological researchers that developed a new software tool, Salmon — a lightweight method to provide fast and bias-aware quantification from RNA-sequencing reads. The research was published in the March 6 edition of Nature Methods. The team includes researchers from the Department of Computer Science at Stony Brook University, University of North Carolina–Chapel Hill, Harvard School of Public Health, Carnegie Mellon School of Computer Science, and private industry. “This research represents a perfect storm for computer science,”…

Research that could help explain the development of cancer or obesity has been published by a collaborative Stony Brook University team led by Lina M. Obeid, MD, Dean of Research at Stony Brook University School of Medicine. Obeid’s team discovered a novel metabolic pathway of the lipid ceramide, which is involved in cell death. The finding illustrates that ceramide is stored in lipid droplets, a step that may help to uncover processes necessary for cell death and lipid metabolism, an issue linked to cancer and obesity. The paper is published in Cell Metabolism. The team of researchers, largely from the Kavita and…

In December, five students from Stony Brook University and their research professor, Nils Feege, loaded a prototype of a magnetic cloak into an SUV and set off for the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Argonne National Laboratory, nearly 900 miles away. The magnetic cloak isn’t a magical garment, but rather a crucial piece of equipment for a possible next-generation particle collider to study nuclear physics. The proposed Electron-Ion Collider, by smashing beams of electrons and protons together at near light speed, would be the most powerful microscope yet developed for understanding how the mass of the proton is dynamically generated…

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