Browsing: Provost’s Lecture

What Darwin Didn’t Know Hopi Hoekstra is the Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology and Curator of Mammals in the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University. She became a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigator in 2013, and in 2016, she was elected into the National Academy of Sciences. Hoekstra is an evolutionary geneticist who studies the molecular basis of adaptation in deer mice. Her research focuses on understanding how variation is generated and maintained in natural populations. In particular, she is interested in understanding both the proximate (molecular, genetic and developmental mechanisms) and ultimate (timing, strength and agent of selection) causes of evolutionary change. Thus, much…

An Overview of High Performance Computing and Challenges for the Future  Jack Dongarra is Distinguished Professor in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Tennessee. He also holds the title of Distinguished Research Staff in the Computer Science and Mathematics Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Dongarra specializes in numerical algorithms in linear algebra, parallel computing, programming methodology and tools for parallel computers. He has contributed to the design and implementation of open source numerical software packages such as LINPACK, BLAS, LAPACK, and MPI. His LINPACK Benchmark is used to rate the world’s fastest supercomputers culminating in the…

Models of Corporate Social Responsibility and Social Entrepreneurship Stanley Bergman is Chairman of the Board and CEO of Henry Schein, Inc., a Fortune 500® company headquartered in Melville, NY, and the world’s largest provider of health care products and services to office-based dental, animal health and medical practitioners. Henry Schein is ranked #1 in its industry on Fortune’s 2016 World’s Most Admired Companies List. Social responsibility is a hallmark of the company’s charter. “Team Schein” works actively to increase access to health care among underserved populations and to foster grassroots health care and sustainable entrepreneurial economic development initiatives in the United…

Disability Mentoring Day: Access and Innovation  L. Scott Lissner is the Americans with Disabilities Act Coordinator and 504 Compliance Officer for Ohio State University, where he is also an associate of the John Glenn School of Public Policy and a lecturer for the Moritz College of Law Knowlton School of Architecture and Disability Studies. His teaching and public service inform his work as the university’s disability compliance officer; energize his role in creating seamless access to the full range of the university’s programs and opportunities; and guide his efforts as a catalyst for disability related initiatives. Engaged in community and professional…

Guerrilla Girls: Not Ready to Make Nice  The Guerrilla Girls are an anonymous collective of feminist activist artists. Appearing only in gorilla masks and assuming the names of dead women artists, the group has remained anonymous for more than three decades while revealing shocking truths about sexism and prejudice in the art world and beyond. The Guerrilla Girls have created more than 100 street projects, posters and stickers all over the world and have a national traveling exhibition of their recent international work, titled Not Ready to Make Nice, now on view at the Paul W. Zuccaire Gallery in Staller Center. Abstract: In…

Leonard Cassuto, Professor of English and American Studies at Fordham University, has written and spoken widely on the history and future of higher education in the United States. He writes a monthly column on graduate education for The Chronicle of Higher Education and is the author or editor of eight books, including the recent The Graduate School Mess: What Caused It and How We Can Fix It (Harvard University Press, 2015). Cassuto is also an award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in venues including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Salon.com. Cassuto offers a lucid and penetrating analysis of the national state of graduate education. By illuminating the history…

Part of the How Class Works Conference Plutocrats: Understanding the 0.1% A veteran labor journalist, Sam Pizzigati has written widely on economic inequality, in articles, books and online, for both popular and scholarly readers. An associate fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, a progressive think tank in Washington, DC, Pizzigati has been editing Too Much ever since the publication’s 1995 debut. His op-eds and articles on income and wealth maldistribution have appeared in a host of major American dailies, magazines and journals. Pizzigati has edited publications for four different national American unions and directed, for 20 years, the publishing operations of America’s largest union, the…

Building a Culture of Diversity in Higher Education: Obstacles and Successes Richard Tapia, the 2010 awardee of the National Medal of Science, is a mathematician in Rice University’s Computational and Applied Mathematics Department. He holds the rank of University Professor, Rice’s highest academic title awarded to only six individuals in the university’s history. Among his many honors, Tapia was an awardee of the 2014 Vannevar Bush award; elected to the National Academy of Engineering (the first Hispanic to receive this honor); and holds honorary doctorates from Carnegie Mellon University, Colorado School of Mines, University of Nevada and Claremont Graduate University. Two professional…

Best Practices in Creating an Inclusive Campus Environment Shaun R. Harper, Founder and Executive Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education at the University of Pennsylvania, is the author of the forthcoming book Race Matters in College and president-elect of the Association for the Study of Higher Education. He is a tenured faculty member in the Graduate School of Education, Africana Studies, and Gender Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Harper maintains an active research agenda that examines race and gender in educational and social contexts, Black male college access and achievement, the effects…

Mass Extinctions and Evolution: What We’ve Learned Since Darwin David Jablonski is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor in the Department of the Geophysical Sciences and the Committee on Evolutionary Biology (a multi-institutional PhD program) at the University of Chicago. He combines data on living and fossil marine organisms to ask large-scale evolutionary questions about origins, extinctions and geographic distributions. Jablonski grew up in New York City a few blocks from the American Museum of Natural History and knew he wanted to be a paleontologist by the age of five. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and…

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