Browsing: Provost’s Lecture

Leonard Cassuto, Professor of English and American Studies at Fordham University, has written and spoken widely on the history and future of higher education in the United States. He writes a monthly column on graduate education for The Chronicle of Higher Education and is the author or editor of eight books, including the recent The Graduate School Mess: What Caused It and How We Can Fix It (Harvard University Press, 2015). Cassuto is also an award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in venues including The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal and Salon.com. Cassuto offers a lucid and penetrating analysis of the national state of graduate education. By illuminating the history…

Part of the How Class Works Conference Plutocrats: Understanding the 0.1% A veteran labor journalist, Sam Pizzigati has written widely on economic inequality, in articles, books and online, for both popular and scholarly readers. An associate fellow at the Institute for Policy Studies, a progressive think tank in Washington, DC, Pizzigati has been editing Too Much ever since the publication’s 1995 debut. His op-eds and articles on income and wealth maldistribution have appeared in a host of major American dailies, magazines and journals. Pizzigati has edited publications for four different national American unions and directed, for 20 years, the publishing operations of America’s largest union, the…

Building a Culture of Diversity in Higher Education: Obstacles and Successes Richard Tapia, the 2010 awardee of the National Medal of Science, is a mathematician in Rice University’s Computational and Applied Mathematics Department. He holds the rank of University Professor, Rice’s highest academic title awarded to only six individuals in the university’s history. Among his many honors, Tapia was an awardee of the 2014 Vannevar Bush award; elected to the National Academy of Engineering (the first Hispanic to receive this honor); and holds honorary doctorates from Carnegie Mellon University, Colorado School of Mines, University of Nevada and Claremont Graduate University. Two professional…

Best Practices in Creating an Inclusive Campus Environment Shaun R. Harper, Founder and Executive Director of the Center for the Study of Race and Equity in Education at the University of Pennsylvania, is the author of the forthcoming book Race Matters in College and president-elect of the Association for the Study of Higher Education. He is a tenured faculty member in the Graduate School of Education, Africana Studies, and Gender Studies at the University of Pennsylvania. Harper maintains an active research agenda that examines race and gender in educational and social contexts, Black male college access and achievement, the effects…

Mass Extinctions and Evolution: What We’ve Learned Since Darwin David Jablonski is the William R. Kenan, Jr. Professor in the Department of the Geophysical Sciences and the Committee on Evolutionary Biology (a multi-institutional PhD program) at the University of Chicago. He combines data on living and fossil marine organisms to ask large-scale evolutionary questions about origins, extinctions and geographic distributions. Jablonski grew up in New York City a few blocks from the American Museum of Natural History and knew he wanted to be a paleontologist by the age of five. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and…

Social Action in Suburbia: Post World War II Long Island as a Case Study Paul Arfin has served as executive director for Long Island nonprofit organizations since 1967. He was a Peace Corps volunteer in Colombia during JFK’s presidency and returned to the U.S. committed to a career in social change. During his Long Island career, Arfin founded Suffolk County’s first youth center and established Long Island’s first interpersonal dispute resolution center and its first corporate-supported intergenerational day care centers. He founded the YMCA of Long Island’s Family Services Division and the Community Programs Center of Long Island, where he served as CEO for 22…

Morphometrics and the Middle-Out Approach to Complex Traits Benedikt Hallgrímsson is Professor of Cell Biology and Anatomy at the University of Calgary’s Alberta Children’s Hospital Research Institute and the McCaig Institute for Bone and Joint Health. He is a biological anthropologist and evolutionary biologist who combines developmental genetics and bioinformatics with 3D imaging and morphometrics to address the developmental basis as well as evolutionary significance of phenotypic variation and variability. His work has focused on the mammalian craniofacial complex, craniofacial dysmorphology in humans, and skeletal biology and disease, and has employed both experimental and comparative approaches. The Rohlf Medal will be presented to…

Raising Global IQ Carl F. Hobert directs Boston University’s Global Literacy Institute and is the author of the bestseller Raising Global IQ: Preparing Our Students for a Shrinking Planet. He is founder and executive director of the Axis of Hope Center for International Conflict Management and Prevention, a Boston-based nonprofit organization that offers conflict-resolution simulation workshops for public and private school students, educators, parents and for executives around the world. During the past 30 years, Hobert has served as a negotiation adviser and mediator in issues ranging from intergroup conflicts in the workplace, to the US-Mexico drug war, and ethnic struggles in Rwanda,…

The Myth of the Modern Dad: What the New York Times, Pew Research, and Everyone Else Got Wrong Josh Levs is an investigative journalist, expert on issues facing modern families and author of All In: How Our Work-First Culture Fails Dads, Families, and Businesses–And How We Can Fix It Together. After 20 years of reporting for NPR and CNN, Levs, a father of three, focuses his book on dispelling myths about today’s dads and moms, and explaining the necessity of new policies such as paid family leave. All In shows that men and women gain from these changes. Levs follows the money,…

Fishing for the Secrets of Stickleback and Human Evolution David Kingsley is a professor of developmental biology at the Stanford University School of Medicine and an investigator with the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His genetic studies of classic mouse skeletal mutations have identified key signaling molecules and membrane transporters used by vertebrates to control skeletal patterning and susceptibility to arthritis. In 1998 he and postdoc Katie Peichel began using genetic mapping strategies to analyze the molecular basis of evolutionary change in natural populations of threespine sticklebacks. This work has subsequently revealed detailed genomic mechanisms that underlie evolution of new traits not…

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