Browsing: Faculty/Staff Highlights

President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., MD, will represent Stony Brook University at the HeForShe IMPACT 10x10x10 Parity Report Launch event in New York City on September 20. Created by UN Women — the United Nations entity for gender equality and the empowerment of women — HeForShe began in September 2014 as a global effort to engage men and boys in support of gender equality. In January 2015, HeForShe’s IMPACT 10x10x10 program launched, which convenes 10 heads of state, 10 global CEOs and 10 university presidents to fast-track gender equality in boardrooms, classrooms and world capitals. Stony Brook University is one of the 10 universities…

In the wake of what turned out to be a deadly protest over the removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville, Va., some citizens and elected officials across the country are pushing to remove public art, such as statues and monuments, that memorialize the Confederacy. The Charlottesville incident [see President’s statement]  and several others have kindled a nationwide debate over memorializing American history. Michele Bogart, professor of art history in the College of Arts and Sciences and one of Stony Brook’s experts on public art and urban design, took a moment to offer her own perspective on…

Danny Bluestein, a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been elected a fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES). His award-winning work tackles the dynamics of flow and cellular transport in blood recirculating devices and the diseased cardiovascular system. He is also director of the Biofluids Research Group at Stony Brook University. BMES fellows demonstrate exceptional achievements and experience in the field of biomedical engineering and are encouraged to continue to pursue leadership within the society and to further improve the future of BMES and biomedical engineering. “Professor Bluestein’s work — combining in silico computer simulations with benchtop lab testing — exemplifies…

Stony Brook University’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and School of Medicine have embarked on an ambitious journey to advance engineering-driven medicine. Dubbed by some as the “third revolution in medicine,” convergence science integrates medicine and engineering to confront some of the big unanswered questions in healthcare, and enables technologies that seek to revolutionize how we deliver healthcare. Together with the Stony Brook University Cancer Center, the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and School of Medicine convened a gathering of clinicians, scientists and engineers to share ideas and stimulate creative collaboration aimed at some of the toughest challenges…

Scientists have yet to understand and explain how life’s informational molecules – proteins and DNA and RNA – arose from simpler chemicals when life on earth emerged some four billion years ago. Now a research team from the Stony Brook University Laufer Center for Physical and Quantitative Biology and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory believe they have the answer. They developed a computational model explaining how certain molecules fold and bind together to grow longer and more complex, leading from simple chemicals to primitive biological molecules. The findings are reported early online in PNAS. Previously scientists learned that the early…

Despite centuries of studying the atom and the particles within it, the mysteries of matter continue to elude scientists. What are we really made of? To solve such an enigma and better understand the building blocks of our universe, Stony Brook University and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have partnered to establish the Center for Frontiers of Nuclear Science, bolstered by a new $5 million grant from the Simons Foundation. “The Center for Frontiers in Nuclear Science will bring us closer to understanding our universe in ways in which it has never before been possible,”…

Jason Trelewicz received the prestigious Early Career Research award from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Office of Science. He will receive $750K over five years to develop his project,  “Enhancing the Performance of Plasma-facing Materials Through Solute-stabilized Nanostructured Tungsten Alloys.” The Department of Energy Early Career Research Program supports the development of individual research programs of outstanding scientists in their early careers. To be eligible, researchers must be untenured, tenure-track assistant or associate professor at a U.S. academic institution, and received a PhD within the last 10 years. “The DOE Early Career award is among the most distinguished honors a…

When Roxanne Brockner isn’t working at Stony Brook’s Institute of Chemical Biology & Drug Discovery (ICB&DD), she’s hitting the track and training hard. Brockner recently represented the U.S. as a member of the USA Track and Field (USATF) Masters Athletics team at the North and Central America and the Caribbean Region of the World Masters Athletics (NCCWMA) Championship in Toronto, Canada. She competed with nearly 1,000 athletes from 26 countries. Brockner not only competed, she won the 100-meter (13.41), 200-meter (27.60) and 400-meter (65.60) events with a personal best time and set new Long Island records for women in the…

Researchers from Stony Brook University, Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have discovered new effects of an important method for modulating semiconductors. The method, which works by creating open spaces or “vacancies” in a material’s structure, enables scientists to tune the electronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (SCNCs) — semiconductor particles that are smaller than 100 nanometers. This finding will advance the development of new technologies like smart windows, which can change opaqueness on demand. Anatoly Frenkel, a professor in Stony Brook’s Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, holds…

The U.S. has a population of more than 50 million seniors for the first time in history. As that number climbs, Stony Brook University has received a three-year $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation to fund research that uses brain imaging data to understand how the nutrition of brain neurons affects cognition in aging humans. The research could provide a critical first step toward personalized medicine in neurology for aging patients. The project, “Protecting the Aging Brain: Self-Organizing Networks and Multi-Scale Dynamics Under Energy Constraints,” is led by Lilianne R. Mujica-Parodi, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook…

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