Browsing: Environmental Stewardship

Saving the Planet, Indigenous Rights and Standing Rock Thursday, April 20, 3 pm, Student Activities Center, Sidney Gelber Auditorium The Roadshow of Resistance is a traveling revue of environmental activism advocating for the rights of Indigenous People. It features music by singer-songwriter Casey Neill and Diné/Cheyenne hip-hop artist Lyla June Johnston. It will also include speeches by Cheryl Angel, a Lakota elder fighting the Dakota Access and Keystone XL pipelines, and Brytnee Laurette with the Center for Biological Diversity. It is a powerful opportunity to join a growing movement of resistance to attacks on our environment from the threat of climate…

World-renowned primatologist Patricia Wright led ABC’s Alex Marquardt through Ranomafana National Park in Madagascar to search for endangered lemurs. The segment aired April 1 on ABC News Nightline. Wright is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at Stony Brook University. Considered to be one of the world’s foremost experts on lemurs, Professor Wright is best known for her 28-year study of social and family interactions of wild lemurs in Ranomafana National Park, a 106,000-acre World Heritage Site that she helped establish with the government of Madagascar. The park is home to many endangered species, including several species of lemur that she almost certainly…

Renowned marine fisheries scientist Ellen Pikitch has been appointed by President Tommy Remengesau of the Republic of Palau to be his special advisor on Matters on Oceans and Seas. Pikitch, director of the Institute for Ocean Conservation Science in Stony Brook’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences, will serve in this role for one year. The honorable title reflects her dedicated effort toward assisting Palau on matters of ocean resource management and conservation. As special advisor Pikitch will work closely with the Government of Palau, Palau’s United Nations Permanent Representative, and Palau’s Honorary Ambassador to the Oceans and Seas. This…

The National Science Foundation’s most prestigious award for early-career faculty (CAREER) has been awarded to Fan Ye, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He will receive an award of $450k over the next five years to build the foundation for a future smart environment. “The idea of a smart environment is to embed all kinds of computing, communication, storage, and sensing resources into common objects around you,” Ye explained, sharing examples such as lights, desks, appliances, and other everyday physical objects. “Once you embed such resources into it, you’ll be surrounded by…

PhD student Qiyuan Wu has received the 2017 Graduate Student Award in Environmental Chemistry from the American Chemical Society (ACS). As the world’s largest scientific society, the ACS awards up to 20 students each year who show promise in research and the potential to make an impact in the field of environmental chemistry. This is Wu’s third award from the ACS, and his achievements highlight the continued excellence in environmental research taking place at Stony Brook’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “Qiyuan developed his research projects independently, exhibiting creativity, thoughtfulness and hard work,” said Alexander Orlov, Associate Professor of Materials Science…

It’s the second week of the 2017 RecycleMania competition, and Stony Brook University is once again looking to finish as the country’s top campus recycler of e-waste. Hundreds of universities and colleges are competing this year’s RecycleMania competition — an eight-week tournament that runs from February 5 to April 1, 2017. To help Stony Brook’s chances, the Department of Recycling and Resource Management has placed e-waste and toner recycling receptacles in lobby spaces around campus. For larger e-waste items such as printers or computers, the campus community is encouraged to contact the recycling department, which is also offering free confidential document shredding and recycling receptacle drop-off and pick-up to help…

As every Biology 101 student knows, symbiosis is a mutually beneficial relationship between two different entities. That’s a good definition of the ties between the Quogue Wildlife Refuge and Stony Brook University. Two of the refuge’s seven staff members are former Stony Brook students and the Refuge’s employees have participated in the University’s annual Earthstock celebration since 2012, educating Stony Brook students about Long Island’s natural world and its inhabitants. The refuge actively recruits its interns at Earthstock because of Stony Brook’s focus on sustainability. The unpaid intern position is for 10 to 20 hours per week for a college…

It will take at least eight million years to restore species recently lost to extinction, according to research on New World leaf-nosed bats by Stony Brook’s Liliana Dávalos. In the Caribbean alone, more than half of the mammal species went extinct after human colonization. Bats are the most diverse group of surviving mammals. Can nature restore the numbers of species on islands to levels that existed before human arrival? How long would it take for nature to regain this lost mammal diversity? To answer these questions, a research team led by Luis Valente at the Berlin Natural History Museum (Germany) and…

In 2016, Stony Brook University was once again an academic hotbed of innovation, diversity, cutting-edge research and groundbreaking discoveries with real-world impact. Stony Brook experts and events were featured in the world’s news columns as we followed the road to the White House, celebrated the medical miracle that gave a young Congolese boy his smile back, advanced global health in Madagascar, and made our first appearance in the NCAA’s Big Dance. As a new year full of promise begins, browse our Top 10 website for a colorful review of Stony Brook’s biggest stories of 2016.

A team of scientists led by Stony Brook University’s Jin Wang, a Professor of Chemistry and Physics, and Physics graduate student Zhedong Zhang, has announced a discovery that could help make sustainable solar energy a reality. The team discovered a mechanism in the energy transfer process of photosynthesis (for the pigment-protein complex) that illustrates quantitatively the maintenance of long-survived quantum coherence. The role of quantum coherence – when subatomic particles cooperate reflecting a form of harmony in the microscopic world – is important to understanding energy transfer in photosynthesis. Recently, a new phenomenon with quantum coherence puzzled many scientists – that…