Browsing: Environmental Stewardship

New York Sea Grant Director Bill Wise participated in a legislative briefing, “Using Science and Outreach to Assist State and Local Decision Makers in Disaster Preparedness and Public Safety,” on November 8 in Washington, DC, which was sponsored by Congressmen Lee Zeldin (NY) and Joe Courtney (CT). Wise and others on the panel conveyed the importance of the National Sea Grant College Program (Sea Grant) to Congressional leaders. Specifically, he discussed the Coastal Storm Awareness Program (CSAP), funded with $1.8 million from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. This program was initiated after Superstorm Sandy to help understand the factors that influenced…

As representatives from around the world meet in Bonn, Germany this month to discuss a way forward on the Paris Agreement and decarbonization, a new book on energy transitions by Kathleen Araújo, assistant professor in the Department of Technology and Society in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, sheds light on the experiences of countries managing the transition to low carbon technologies. Low Carbon Energy Transitions: Turning Points in National Policy and Innovation (Oxford University Press) draws on over 120 interviews with scientists, governmental employees, academics, and members of civil society. Araújo focuses on four unique cases: Brazilian biofuels, Danish wind power,…

Governor Andrew M. Cuomo today announced the completion of a comprehensive energy efficiency project at Stony Brook University that will save the campus more than $832,000 in annual energy costs while also reducing greenhouse gas emissions by more than 3,800 tons a year – the equivalent of taking more than 730 cars off the road. The project supports Governor Cuomo’s goal to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 40 percent by 2030, which is part of the Governor’s Reforming the Energy Vision strategy to build a statewide energy system that is clean, resilient and affordable for all New Yorkers.  “We are taking aggressive action…

The challenges are formidable and the predictions bold — envisioning an end to extreme poverty, inequality and climate change by 2030. Highlighting these ambitious goals, Timothy Bouley, MD, launched the Global Health Institute’s Precision Planetary Lecture Series October 26 at the Charles B. Wang Center Theatre. Bouley is a global health and environmental specialist who is at the forefront of the World Bank’s efforts to integrate health and environmental considerations into its investments. Following an introduction by President Samuel L. Stanley Jr., Peter Small, MD, founding director of the Global Health Institute, welcomed Distinguished Service Professor Patricia Wright via Skype…

A new study from world’s leading lemur expert paints a grim picture for future of dietary specialists like the critically endangered Greater Bamboo Lemur. Human disturbance of tropical rainforests in Madagascar, including wildfires, burning and timber exploitation, have led to reduced rainfall and a longer dry season, further pushing the Greater Bamboo Lemur to the brink of extinction. Findings are published in a new study from primatologist and lemur expert, Patricia Chapple Wright of Stony Brook University, evolutionary biologist Jukka Jernvall of University of Helsinki in Finland, and colleagues. The study is entitled Feeding Ecology and Morphology Make a Bamboo Specialist…

“In theory I would be on a plane heading for Puerto Rico, but I am a graduate student without much money — so I am glad to be helping the Red Cross with their relief efforts any way I can,” said Ian Bonnell ’16. Bonnell, who is enrolled in the five-year Master’s program in mechanical engineering at Stony Brook, spoke as he documented the locations of storm-ravaged buildings in the hurricane-stricken U.S. territory. He was one of nearly 80 Stony Brook students, faculty and staff participating in an innovative initiative called “Disaster Relief Map-A-Thon: Puerto Rico.” “It’s great that we…

Three Stony Brook science professors delivered a powerful message to Capitol Hill at a public forum on water quality last month. Professors Jeffrey Levinton, Joseph Warren and Michael Frisk journeyed to Washington, DC in conjunction with the Hudson River Sloop Clearwater, a Beacon, New York-based grassroots organization founded by Pete Seeger. These advocates for environmental action conveyed a “cargo of concern” consisting of municipal resolutions, petitions and personal messages from residents and communities between the Hudson Valley and Washington DC to decision makers in support of fair and equal environmental policies and projections based on science. The action was symbolic of a…

New research reveals that sulfur dioxide, a major contributor to air pollution, is removed from the air by concrete surfaces. Stony Brook University researcher Alex Orlov, PhD, and colleagues discovered how concrete interacts and eliminates sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Their findings, published in the July edition of the Journal of Chemical Engineering, could be a significant step toward the practice of using waste concrete to minimize air pollution. According to the World Health Organization, as many as seven million premature deaths of people worldwide may be linked to poor air quality and pollution. Sulfur dioxide emissions are among the most common…

Department of Art Professor Nobuho Nagasawa recently received the New York City Public Design Commission’s highest honor at the 34th Annual Awards for Excellence in Design, held at City Hall. Professor Nagasawa was honored for her permanent public art “Luminescence,” the installation of which is currently in progress at the newly developed Peninsula, Hunter’s Point South Waterfront Park on the East River in Queens, New York. Designed to enhance a new public waterfront park situated on approximately 30 acres of prime East River property in Long Island City, “Luminescence” consists of seven sculptures that emulate the seven phases of the moon. Each moon sculpture is cast in white…

In a June 25 episode of Sunday Night With Megyn Kelly, NBC News’ Harry Smith journeyed to Antarctica and spoke with Stony Brook’s Heather Lynch about the signs penguins might be giving us about climate change. Dr. Lynch called penguins the “canaries in the coalmine” of global warming. “All the species on the planet are going to have to deal with climate change,” she said. “It’s not just an Antarctic issue. But these penguins are dealing with it now.” Lynch and her team count the numbers of various penguin species in order to track the impact of climate change. Her…

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