Browsing: College of Engineering & Applied Sciences

Materials science is a field that Jason Trelewicz has been interested in since he was a young child, when his father — an engineer — would bring him to work. In the materials lab at his father’s workplace, Trelewicz would use optical microscopes to zoom in on material surfaces, intrigued by all the distinct features he would see as light interacted with different samples. Trelewicz is now an assistant professor in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences’ Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering with a joint appointment in the Institute for Advanced Computational Science at Stony Brook University…

The College of Engineering and Applied Sciences is proud to announce the 2018 Distinguished Alumni Hall of Fame Honoree: John L. Hennessy, Stanford University President Emeritus and Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. Hennessy received his PhD ‘77 and MS ‘75 in Computer Science from Stony Brook University’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “John Hennessy’s pursuit of excellence in higher education, and his passion for the advancement of technology, will impact generations of innovators and educators,” said Fotis Sotiropoulos, Dean, College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “With this honor, we thank him for his immeasurable contributions that inspire our…

The study of objects less than a billionth of a meter, also known as “nanometers,” is a special research discipline that Materials Science and Engineering Professor Alexander Orlov has been working on for years. A major breakthrough in this field has been the emergence of a new generation of consumer products containing nanoparticles, nano-enabled biomedical devices and many other exciting developments straight out of science fiction novels. However, like many scientific breakthroughs, there is hesitation in the implementation of nanotechnology. “It is a very difficult area to describe, as you cannot see nanoparticles with the naked eye,” Orlov explained. “People…

At an investiture ceremony on the Stony Brook University campus, three new endowed chairs were formally appointed; two leading pediatric clinical research physicians at Stony Brook Children’s Hospital and a renowned materials scientist and chemical engineer at the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. The three new endowed faculty positions were funded by philanthropic gifts from the Knapp family through the Knapp Swezey Foundation, Island Outreach Foundation, and Jane and William Knapp respectively. “From the start of my tenure at Stony Brook, it has been my goal to create 100 endowed faculty positions across a wide range of disciplines to…

As representatives from around the world meet in Bonn, Germany this month to discuss a way forward on the Paris Agreement and decarbonization, a new book on energy transitions by Kathleen Araújo, assistant professor in the Department of Technology and Society in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, sheds light on the experiences of countries managing the transition to low carbon technologies. Low Carbon Energy Transitions: Turning Points in National Policy and Innovation (Oxford University Press) draws on over 120 interviews with scientists, governmental employees, academics, and members of civil society. Araújo focuses on four unique cases: Brazilian biofuels, Danish wind power,…

Relevant learning — a teaching method through which faculty reconfigure their curricula by linking academic content to real-world problems — has long been central to Stony Brook’s mission. Now a key national initiative in relevant learning is housed at the University thanks to a visionary program, Science Education for New Civic Engagements and Responsibilities (SENCER). Using the SENCER approach, for example, a biology professor may choose to teach a course from the perspective of an HIV/AIDS patient, or an engineering professor may identify problems in Third World countries and encourage the class to come up with solutions. Engaging students —…

For his work focusing on the risks involved in deploying fully autonomous computer systems, Romeil Sandhu has been awarded $450K from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), through the Air Force’s Young Investigator Research Program. Sandhu is an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Informatics, jointly administered by Stony Brook’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and School of Medicine. His research could impact autonomous systems for a variety of systems that rely on artificial Intelligence, including self-driving automobiles and drones. Professor Sandhu is one of only 43 scientists and engineers to receive the award, for his proposal addressing 3D Interactive…

Eric Brouzes, an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation CBET division entitled, “Physical Principles of Magnetic Extraction from Microfluidic Droplets.” This three-year, $300K award will study the extraction of magnetic beads from microfluidic droplets with the translational goal of developing an efficient way to access genetic information of single cells at high speed. These droplets are extremely stable, they act as capsules that do not merge with each other unless directed, and can be precisely controlled at high speed. That approach has proven beneficial in many applications, such…

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has awarded Joel Saltz, MD, together with and a team of researchers from the University of Arkansas and Emory University, a $8M grant over the next five years to develop an integrated Radiology/Pathology/”omics” data repository that will enable team science research with the ultimate goal of developing ways of steering cancer treatment. This effort will develop and deploy tools to create large collections of well-curated data for algorithm testing and validation. “Cancer is a complex multifactorial disease state and the ability to anticipate and steer treatment results will require information synthesis across multiple scales from the…

The Siemens Competition — the nation’s premier competition in math, science and technology for high school students — has announced its semifinalists for this year. Out of 491 national semifinalists, 55 students were mentored by Stony Brook faculty; 12 of those were named regional finalists and will continue on to compete in November. Each year, students submit innovative individual and team research projects to regional and national levels of competition as they vie for college scholarships ranging from $1,000 up to $100,000. This year for the first time, a new prize structure guarantees that national finalists will receive a minimum of $25,000. The…

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