Browsing: College of Arts & Sciences

Stony Brook Opera and members of the Stony Brook Symphony Orchestra present Benjamin Britten’s opera, The Rape of Lucretia, on Saturday, April 22, at 8 pm at Staller Center. An encore performance will be held on Sunday, April 23, at 3 pm. The cast of this fully staged theatrical production features graduate students in voice from Stony Brook’s College of Arts and Sciences Department of Music, many of whom have already established professional singing careers. Soprano Ju Hyeon Han performs the role of the Female Chorus, in what will be the first time in the U.S. that a blind singer will…

Do you have what it takes to become a public intellectual? Do you envision yourself as a pioneering leader in your field, as someone who inspires greater public interest in your discipline? This semester, Stony Brook students pondering these questions have an invaluable resource in public intellectual Naomi Wolf, the University’s visiting lecturer, New York Times best-selling nonfiction author, and third-wave feminist activist. First invited to present a workshop series in 2015 by Sacha Kopp, Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences (CAS), Wolf — a cultural commentator, political activist, Rhodes Scholar, and PhD holder in English literature from…

World-renowned primatologist Patricia Wright led ABC’s Alex Marquardt through Ranomafana National Park in Madagascar to search for endangered lemurs. The segment aired April 1 on ABC News Nightline. Wright is Distinguished Professor of Anthropology at Stony Brook University. Considered to be one of the world’s foremost experts on lemurs, Professor Wright is best known for her 28-year study of social and family interactions of wild lemurs in Ranomafana National Park, a 106,000-acre World Heritage Site that she helped establish with the government of Madagascar. The park is home to many endangered species, including several species of lemur that she almost certainly…

Anand Giridharadas, former correspondent and columnist for The New York Times, will discuss “Leadership and Values: The Future of Leading in a Multicultural World” on Thursday, March 30, at 4 pm in the Charles B. Wang Center Theatre as part of the Dr. Krishna Gujavarty Family Seminar presented by the Bishembarnath & Sheela Mattoo Center for India Studies. Given the changes in society brought about by today’s “new style,” where technology and social media are changing power equations, Giridharadas will discuss how to lead in a multicultural world, transcending a narrow Western lens and developing empathy for other cultures. Giridharadas appears regularly…

According to U.S. News & World Report’s 2018 Best Graduate Schools, Stony Brook University is ranked one of the top 100 engineering schools in the country, and 14 of our graduate programs — including five in engineering — are also among the highest ranked in the nation. The 2018 edition features information and rankings in business, law, education, engineering, medicine and nursing, as well as specialty rankings within each graduate school discipline. Stony Brook’s programs making the Top 100 list include: Economics Biomedical Engineering Computer Engineering Electrical Engineering Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Mechanical Engineering English History Medical: Research Nursing (DNP program) Nursing (Master’s program) Political Science Psychology…

American historian Nancy Tomes has been awarded Columbia University’s 2017 Bancroft Prize in American History and Diplomacy, one of the most distinguished academic awards in the field of history. Tomes, Distinguished Professor in the Department of History at Stony Brook University, received this prestigious honor for her book, Remaking the American Patient: How Madison Avenue and Modern Medicine Turned Patients into Consumers (University of North Carolina Press, 2016). In the book, which spans the 20th century, Tomes questions the popular and largely unexamined idea that in order to receive quality health care, people must learn to shop for it. Understanding where…

 Professor Nancy Hiemstra addresses today’s immigration policy issues in her recent Huffington Post op ed, “What Would You Do to Save Your Kids? The Outrage of Separating Immigrant Families at the Border.” Hiemstra, an assistant professor in the Department of Women’s, Gender and Sexuality Studies, incorporates ideas and topics that address some of the latest issues relevant to her courses. Last semester, she taught an undergraduate class that focused on immigration, discussing many different aspects of contemporary immigration policy. “As someone who researches detention and deportation, I know that these policies are heavily influenced by beliefs that are simply incorrect, for…

As lead institution for the U.S. ATLAS collaboration, Stony Brook University has received additional National Science Foundation (NSF) funding toward the project. This recent $5.4M award for U.S. ATLAS Operations: Discovery and Measurement at the Energy Frontier will stimulate development of a scientific and technically educated workforce, advancing the multidisciplinary application of technology and the popularization and dissemination of science to the general public. Stony Brook Physics Professor John Hobbs is principal investigator for U.S. NSF operations of ATLAS, which has received a total amount of over $54M in funding to date. This ongoing project provides the U.S. contribution to the international ATLAS experiment at…

The Department of Theatre Arts will present a panel discussion, “Using Theatre as a Tool for Social Justice” on Thursday, March 9, at 8 pm in Staller Center, Theatre 1. This dynamic discussion will center on using Theatre Arts as a tool for social justice and as an agent for change in audiences’ perception and experience of events and issues. Speakers include: Emily Joy Weiner, co-founder and artistic director of Off Broadway’s Houses on the Moon Theater Company Patrick Blake, artistic director of Rhymes Over Beats and Off-Broadway producer; produced “The Exonerated,” a play that in 2002 was a key…

Traditional academic silos mean little to Phillip Baldwin, an associate professor in the Department of Theatre Arts in the College of Arts & Sciences who guides his students toward innovative thinking that merges science, technology, engineering and mathematics with music, film, theater and art. “What I see in a lot of STEM students is this thirst to get beyond sheer memorization because the human mind loves a healthy diet of innovation, novelty, curiosity and things that aren’t quite in the scientific method,” Baldwin said. Some call it “STEM to STEAM” – adding an “A” for art to the STEM curriculum -…

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