Browsing: College of Arts & Sciences

Abigail Bishop ’19, a junior in the Women in Science & Engineering (WISE) program, is becoming an expert on the life and death of stars. Abby probes the heavens under the mentorship of Michael Zingale, associate professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy in the College of Arts and Sciences. They create Type Ia supernovae simulations to investigate a form of stellar death used to measure distance astronomically. In her sophomore year, Abby participated in research under the supervision of Drs. Krishna Kumar and Seamus Riordan and co-presented a poster at the annual URECA (Undergraduate Research & Creative Activities) Celebration of Undergraduate Research event…

Annie Bernberg knew she wanted to explore a career in publishing as early as the seventh grade.  An avid reader, Annie fell in love with A School Story by Andrew Clements, about a girl who wants to publish a book and the process she must go through. The premise was exciting for Annie — imagine having a hand in making the books she always reads! Today, Annie is an assistant editor at Barron’s Educational Series, Inc., and is pursuing a master’s degree in publishing. A student in the College of Arts and Sciences, Annie originally declared a double major in…

Was it violence or pathogens that took the greatest toll on Native Americans? Should historians refer to the loss of life as genocide or an accidental consequence of epidemics? Or perhaps, it was a combination of factors. Newly arrived Department of History Professor Paul Kelton presented his audience with the academic evidence to draw their own conclusions and spark their own dialogue at the University Libraries lecture “Germs, Genocides and American’s Indigenous Peoples” on November 27. In 2015, Kelton read about a classroom incident between a Native American student and a professor at California State University at Sacramento in which…

While skin pigmentation is nearly 100 percent heritable, it is far more genetically complex than previously thought. According to a new study published in Cell, co-authored by Stony Brook’s Brenna Henn, the genetics of skin pigmentation become progressively complex as populations reside closer to the equator, with an increasing number of genes—known and unknown—involved, each making a smaller overall contribution. Researchers from SBU, Stanford University and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard worked closely with the KhoeSan, a group of populations indigenous to southern Africa. They found that earlier studies of the genetics of skin pigmentation are misleading because they rely on…

The Rohlf Medal for Excellence in Morphometric Methods and Applications will be presented to Dennis E. Slice on Tuesday, October 24, 2017 at the Provost’s Lecture Series, Charles B. Wang Center, Lecture Hall 1, 4 pm. In his presentation, “An Unexpected Journey: A Curious Career in Shape Analysis,” Dr. Slice will discuss the developments in shape analysis during his graduate career, the people who influenced him, and his post-graduate work in software and methodological developments and applications. Created in honor of F. James Rohlf, PhD, Distinguished Professor Emeritus of the Stony Brook University College of Arts and Sciences Department of…

The Siemens Competition — the nation’s premier competition in math, science and technology for high school students — has announced its semifinalists for this year. Out of 491 national semifinalists, 55 students were mentored by Stony Brook faculty; 12 of those were named regional finalists and will continue on to compete in November. Each year, students submit innovative individual and team research projects to regional and national levels of competition as they vie for college scholarships ranging from $1,000 up to $100,000. This year for the first time, a new prize structure guarantees that national finalists will receive a minimum of $25,000. The…

For decades, statistical agencies such as the United Nations, the U.S. Census Bureau and Eurostat have provided data and analyses of population aging, assuming that the only characteristic that was relevant to the study of population aging was chronological age. But this is not the case. Sixty-five-year-olds today have longer remaining life expectancies and score higher on tests of cognitive functioning than 65-year-olds in the past. Data on population aging that ignore the changing characteristics of people produce a distorted picture of the extent of population aging in the future. Warren Sanderson, a professor in the Department of Economics at Stony Brook…

A team of students and faculty from the College of Arts and Sciences and the Graduate School at Stony Brook University recently received a $488,000 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) for their project, The Ph.D. Career Ladder Program (PCLP): A Grassroots Approach to Career Development. The team is led by Nancy Goroff, chair of the Department of Chemistry; Kathleen Flint Ehm, director for Graduate and Postdoctoral Professional Development and faculty advisor for the Graduate Career Association; Bonita London, Associate Professor of Psychology; and Jennifer DeLeon, a postdoctoral scholar who recently completed her PhD in Molecular and Cellular Biology…

Two Stony Brook University Department of Physics and Astronomy faculty in the College of Arts and Sciences recently received the Department of Energy (DOE) Early Career Award for their individual research projects related to the discovery of dark energy and dark matter.   Assistant Professor Anja von der Linden was awarded for her project, “Towards Precision Cluster Cosmology with Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)”; Assistant Professor Marilena Loverde, also appointed in the Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics,  was awarded for “Discovering Dark Energy, Dark Matter, and Neutrino Properties with Cosmic Structure.”  Each will receive $750,000 over five years to develop…

Department of Art Professor Nobuho Nagasawa recently received the New York City Public Design Commission’s highest honor at the 34th Annual Awards for Excellence in Design, held at City Hall. Professor Nagasawa was honored for her permanent public art “Luminescence,” the installation of which is currently in progress at the newly developed Peninsula, Hunter’s Point South Waterfront Park on the East River in Queens, New York. Designed to enhance a new public waterfront park situated on approximately 30 acres of prime East River property in Long Island City, “Luminescence” consists of seven sculptures that emulate the seven phases of the moon. Each moon sculpture is cast in white…

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