Browsing: Brookhaven National Lab

Researchers from Stony Brook University, Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have discovered new effects of an important method for modulating semiconductors. The method, which works by creating open spaces or “vacancies” in a material’s structure, enables scientists to tune the electronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (SCNCs) — semiconductor particles that are smaller than 100 nanometers. This finding will advance the development of new technologies like smart windows, which can change opaqueness on demand. Anatoly Frenkel, a professor in Stony Brook’s Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, holds…

A research team from Stony Brook University and Brookhaven National Laboratory has been studying argon gas, and the group’s findings have been published in Nature Communications. Argon and other noble gases have previously been trapped in three-dimensional porous materials. Prior to the SBU-BNL research, immobilizing these gases on surfaces had only been achieved by either cooling them to very low temperatures to condense them, or by accelerating gas ions to implant them directly into materials. The SBU-BNL research team synthesized a two-dimensional structure and successfully trapped argon atoms inside the nanosized pore structure at room temperature. This achievement will enable…

High-temperature superconductivity offers perfect conveyance of electricity, but it does so at the price of extreme cold and an ever-elusive mechanism. If understood, scientists might push superconductivity into warmer temperatures and radically enhance power grids, consumer electronics, and more—but the puzzle has persisted for more than 30 years. Now, Stony Brook University PhD student and a team of scientists have broken new ground by approaching from a counter-intuitive angle: probing so-called “bad metals” that conduct electricity poorly. The researchers found that “stripes” of electronic charge, which may play a key role in superconductivity, persist across surprisingly high temperatures, shape conductivity,…

Humans are visual creatures: our brain processes images 60,000 times faster than text, and 90 percent of information sent to the brain is visual. Visualization is becoming increasingly useful in the era of big data, in which we are generating so much data at such high rates that we cannot keep up with making sense of it all. In particular, visual analytics—a research discipline that combines automated data analysis with interactive visualizations—has emerged as a promising approach to dealing with this information overload. “Visual analytics provides a bridge between advanced computational capabilities and human knowledge and judgment,” said Wei Xu,…

Tiny strands of fungi weave through the roots of an estimated nine out of 10 plants on Earth, an underground symbiosis in which the plant gives the fungus pre-made sugars and the fungus sends the plant basic nutrients in return. Scientists are interested in enhancing this mechanism as a way to help plants grow on nutrient-poor lands. Their success could lead to increased production of plant-based biofuels without having to compete with food crops for fertile farmland. “When fungus grows within the plant’s root system, it produces hair-like extensions all throughout the soil. These are thinner than the root hairs…

As lead institution for the U.S. ATLAS collaboration, Stony Brook University has received additional National Science Foundation (NSF) funding toward the project. This recent $5.4M award for U.S. ATLAS Operations: Discovery and Measurement at the Energy Frontier will stimulate development of a scientific and technically educated workforce, advancing the multidisciplinary application of technology and the popularization and dissemination of science to the general public. Stony Brook Physics Professor John Hobbs is principal investigator for U.S. NSF operations of ATLAS, which has received a total amount of over $54M in funding to date. This ongoing project provides the U.S. contribution to the international ATLAS experiment at…

Nusnin Akter, a PhD student in the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering, won the Richard J. Kokes Award sponsored by the North American Catalysis Society and administered by the North American Meetings (NAM) organization. The competitive Kokes Award encourages students to attend and participate in the biennial NAM conference, at which Akter will present her work in Denver, Colorado, this June. Nusnin Akter, mentored by Assistant Professor Taejin Kim from Stony Brook and Jorge Anibal Boscoboinik from Brookhaven National Lab, has been investigating heterogeneous catalysts to understand the relationship between molecular/electronic catalyst structure and catalytic activity for the…

The Brookhaven Women in Science Symposium — “Girl Power in STEM: Be Bold for Change!” — celebrates the accomplishments of women in Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) fields. This year’s event brings together women who are Stony Brook faculty in the sciences, Brookhaven Laboratory scientists, and other science professionals to educate students, aspiring scientists, and the community about women’s careers in STEM. The day-long symposium is scheduled for Saturday, March 4, from 9 am to 5 pm, at Stony Brook’s Center for Global Studies and Human Development, and includes presentations and panel discussions on how women influence STEM at the various stages of academic and professional…

Nusnin Akter, a Materials Science and Chemical Engineering graduate student, won the first place poster award for her research, “2D-Zeolite for the Argon Trap,” at the fifth annual Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) Early Career Researcher Symposium, presented by the Association of Students and Postdocs at BNL on December 13. This symposium is a showcase of the pioneering research that is performed by graduate students and postdocs at BNL. Akter is mentored by Stony Brook University Professor Taejin Kim and Brookhaven National Lab’s Jorge Anibal Boscoboinik, “One of the things I dreamed of as I planned for my graduate studies was to…

Jianping Huang, a graduate student at Stony Brook University working on his PhD in chemistry, was awarded the 12th annual Mow Shiah Lin Scholarship sponsored by the Asian Pacific American Association at Brookhaven National Lab. He received $1,000 and a plaque at a ceremony at Brookhaven Lab on September 28. Huang is pursuing his PhD in the Sustainable Energy Technologies Department at Brookhaven, working with Stony Brook Distinguished Professor Esther Takeuchi as his advisor. Huang’s focus is on energy materials research. “I will focus my research to further understand electron transfer and ion transport processes, which are of significant importance…

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