Browsing: Brookhaven National Lab

The College of Engineering and Applied Sciences has been awarded $1 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E). Led by Professor Ya Wang, the funding will be used to develop a Synchronized Low-Energy Electronically-Chopped Passive-InfraRed (PIR) Sensor for Occupancy Detection (SLEEPIR), an inventive occupancy sensing solution, for residential homes for detecting high-accuracy human presence. This non-mechanical oscillating technique, together with an advanced machine learning algorithm, is designed to address issues associated with high rates of false alarms in existing PIR sensors — a long-time complication in high-accuracy occupancy detection. This technology relies on the use…

Materials science is a field that Jason Trelewicz has been interested in since he was a young child, when his father — an engineer — would bring him to work. In the materials lab at his father’s workplace, Trelewicz would use optical microscopes to zoom in on material surfaces, intrigued by all the distinct features he would see as light interacted with different samples. Trelewicz is now an assistant professor in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences’ Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering with a joint appointment in the Institute for Advanced Computational Science at Stony Brook University…

Scientists from Stony Brook University have used a novel technique at the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science User Facility located at Brookhaven National Laboratory, to answer longstanding questions in medical imaging. The research team used individual x-rays to characterize the physics of how light moves within scintillators—a component of x-ray detectors—for the very first time. Their findings could aid the development of more efficient x-ray detectors for improved medical diagnoses. X-ray imaging is a widespread technique for viewing the internal structures of matter. In the medical field, x-ray imaging is used to generate images of…

In honor of Dark Matter Day, Brookhaven National Lab will present, “The Dark Universe: Mysterious Invisible Forces Rippling Through the Cosmos,” on Tuesday, October 24, at 7 pm at the Bluestone Tavern, 21 Montauk Highway, West Sayville, NY. Join expert physicists and cosmologists to talk about the mysterious and invisible matter that fills our universe. Hosts for this Science Café include Neelima Sehgal, an assistant professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Stony Brook University, Paul O’Connor, a senior scientist at Brookhaven National Lab, and Paul Stankus, a physicist at Oak Ridge National Lab. Admission is free; menu and…

A joint Stony Brook-BNL research team has found a way to capture the details of chemistry’s elaborate choreography as it happens. Led by Anatoly Frenkel, a professor in Stony Brook University’s Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Department who has a joint appointment with Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Chemistry Division, the team relied on computers that have learned to recognize the steps in a complex dance of atoms involved in chemical reactions. The findings should help them improve the performance of catalysts to drive reactions toward desired products faster. The method—developed by an interdisciplinary team of chemists, computational scientists, and physicists at…

Stony Brook University Professor Anatoly Frenkel, from the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has been elected a 2017 Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). He received this prestigious recognition for his outstanding physics research, specifically for seminal contributions to in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, transformative development of structural characterization methods for nanoparticles, and their pioneering applications to a broad range of functional nanomaterials in materials physics and catalysis science. Professor Frenkel joined the Stony Brook faculty in 2016 after working at Yeshiva University. He was a post-doctoral fellow at…

Nergis Mavalvala, Marble Professor of Astrophysics at MIT, will discuss “The Warped Universe: the one hundred year quest to discover Einstein’s gravitational waves” on Wednesday, October 11, at 4 pm at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Berkner Hall. Dr. Mavalvala, 2010 recipient of a MacArthur “genius” award, is a physicist whose research focuses on the detection of gravitational waves and quantum measurement science. She is a longtime member of the scientific team that announced in 2016 the first direct detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). The gravitational waves that LIGO detected are ripples in the spacetime…

Stony Brook undergraduates were among a diverse group of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students who attended the Computational Science Initiative (CSI) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory this past summer. CIS is part of an initiative aimed at enhancing diversity in the field of computer science. “To address challenges in science, we need to bring together the best minds available,” said CSI Director Kerstin Kleese van Dam. “Great talents are rare but can be found among all groups, so we reach out to the broadest talent pools in search of our top researchers at every education level…

Despite centuries of studying the atom and the particles within it, the mysteries of matter continue to elude scientists. What are we really made of? To solve such an enigma and better understand the building blocks of our universe, Stony Brook University and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have partnered to establish the Center for Frontiers of Nuclear Science, bolstered by a new $5 million grant from the Simons Foundation. “The Center for Frontiers in Nuclear Science will bring us closer to understanding our universe in ways in which it has never before been possible,”…

Researchers from Stony Brook University, Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have discovered new effects of an important method for modulating semiconductors. The method, which works by creating open spaces or “vacancies” in a material’s structure, enables scientists to tune the electronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (SCNCs) — semiconductor particles that are smaller than 100 nanometers. This finding will advance the development of new technologies like smart windows, which can change opaqueness on demand. Anatoly Frenkel, a professor in Stony Brook’s Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, holds…

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