Browsing: Brookhaven National Lab

In honor of Dark Matter Day, Brookhaven National Lab will present, “The Dark Universe: Mysterious Invisible Forces Rippling Through the Cosmos,” on Tuesday, October 24, at 7 pm at the Bluestone Tavern, 21 Montauk Highway, West Sayville, NY. Join expert physicists and cosmologists to talk about the mysterious and invisible matter that fills our universe. Hosts for this Science Café include Neelima Sehgal, an assistant professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy at Stony Brook University, Paul O’Connor, a senior scientist at Brookhaven National Lab, and Paul Stankus, a physicist at Oak Ridge National Lab. Admission is free; menu and…

A joint Stony Brook-BNL research team has found a way to capture the details of chemistry’s elaborate choreography as it happens. Led by Anatoly Frenkel, a professor in Stony Brook University’s Materials Science and Chemical Engineering Department who has a joint appointment with Brookhaven National Laboratory’s Chemistry Division, the team relied on computers that have learned to recognize the steps in a complex dance of atoms involved in chemical reactions. The findings should help them improve the performance of catalysts to drive reactions toward desired products faster. The method—developed by an interdisciplinary team of chemists, computational scientists, and physicists at…

Stony Brook University Professor Anatoly Frenkel, from the Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, has been elected a 2017 Fellow of the American Physical Society (APS). He received this prestigious recognition for his outstanding physics research, specifically for seminal contributions to in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy, transformative development of structural characterization methods for nanoparticles, and their pioneering applications to a broad range of functional nanomaterials in materials physics and catalysis science. Professor Frenkel joined the Stony Brook faculty in 2016 after working at Yeshiva University. He was a post-doctoral fellow at…

Nergis Mavalvala, Marble Professor of Astrophysics at MIT, will discuss “The Warped Universe: the one hundred year quest to discover Einstein’s gravitational waves” on Wednesday, October 11, at 4 pm at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Berkner Hall. Dr. Mavalvala, 2010 recipient of a MacArthur “genius” award, is a physicist whose research focuses on the detection of gravitational waves and quantum measurement science. She is a longtime member of the scientific team that announced in 2016 the first direct detection of gravitational waves from colliding black holes by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO). The gravitational waves that LIGO detected are ripples in the spacetime…

Stony Brook undergraduates were among a diverse group of high school, undergraduate, and graduate students who attended the Computational Science Initiative (CSI) at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory this past summer. CIS is part of an initiative aimed at enhancing diversity in the field of computer science. “To address challenges in science, we need to bring together the best minds available,” said CSI Director Kerstin Kleese van Dam. “Great talents are rare but can be found among all groups, so we reach out to the broadest talent pools in search of our top researchers at every education level…

Despite centuries of studying the atom and the particles within it, the mysteries of matter continue to elude scientists. What are we really made of? To solve such an enigma and better understand the building blocks of our universe, Stony Brook University and the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) have partnered to establish the Center for Frontiers of Nuclear Science, bolstered by a new $5 million grant from the Simons Foundation. “The Center for Frontiers in Nuclear Science will bring us closer to understanding our universe in ways in which it has never before been possible,”…

Researchers from Stony Brook University, Brookhaven National Laboratory and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem have discovered new effects of an important method for modulating semiconductors. The method, which works by creating open spaces or “vacancies” in a material’s structure, enables scientists to tune the electronic properties of semiconductor nanocrystals (SCNCs) — semiconductor particles that are smaller than 100 nanometers. This finding will advance the development of new technologies like smart windows, which can change opaqueness on demand. Anatoly Frenkel, a professor in Stony Brook’s Department of Materials Science and Chemical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, holds…

A research team from Stony Brook University and Brookhaven National Laboratory has been studying argon gas, and the group’s findings have been published in Nature Communications. Argon and other noble gases have previously been trapped in three-dimensional porous materials. Prior to the SBU-BNL research, immobilizing these gases on surfaces had only been achieved by either cooling them to very low temperatures to condense them, or by accelerating gas ions to implant them directly into materials. The SBU-BNL research team synthesized a two-dimensional structure and successfully trapped argon atoms inside the nanosized pore structure at room temperature. This achievement will enable…

High-temperature superconductivity offers perfect conveyance of electricity, but it does so at the price of extreme cold and an ever-elusive mechanism. If understood, scientists might push superconductivity into warmer temperatures and radically enhance power grids, consumer electronics, and more—but the puzzle has persisted for more than 30 years. Now, Stony Brook University PhD student and a team of scientists have broken new ground by approaching from a counter-intuitive angle: probing so-called “bad metals” that conduct electricity poorly. The researchers found that “stripes” of electronic charge, which may play a key role in superconductivity, persist across surprisingly high temperatures, shape conductivity,…

Humans are visual creatures: our brain processes images 60,000 times faster than text, and 90 percent of information sent to the brain is visual. Visualization is becoming increasingly useful in the era of big data, in which we are generating so much data at such high rates that we cannot keep up with making sense of it all. In particular, visual analytics—a research discipline that combines automated data analysis with interactive visualizations—has emerged as a promising approach to dealing with this information overload. “Visual analytics provides a bridge between advanced computational capabilities and human knowledge and judgment,” said Wei Xu,…

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