Browsing: Medicine and Research

The U.S. has a population of more than 50 million seniors for the first time in history. As that number climbs, Stony Brook University has received a three-year $1 million grant from the W.M. Keck Foundation to fund research that uses brain imaging data to understand how the nutrition of brain neurons affects cognition in aging humans. The research could provide a critical first step toward personalized medicine in neurology for aging patients. The project, “Protecting the Aging Brain: Self-Organizing Networks and Multi-Scale Dynamics Under Energy Constraints,” is led by Lilianne R. Mujica-Parodi, Associate Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Stony Brook…

The discovery in Kenya of a remarkably complete fossil ape skull reveals what the common ancestor of all living apes and humans may have looked like. The find, announced in the scientific journal Nature on August 10th, belongs to an infant that lived about 13 million years ago. The research was done by an international team led by Isaiah Nengo of the Stony Brook University-affiliated Turkana Basin Institute, Stony Brook University, and De Anza College, U.S.A. Among living primates, humans are most closely related to the apes, including chimpanzees, gorillas, orangutans and gibbons. Our common ancestor with chimpanzees lived in Africa 6 to 7…

Research ideas like immunotherapy for early stage breast cancer treatment and novel PET tracer development for breast cancer imaging are driving a groundbreaking idea at the Stony Brook Cancer Center: Prevention is the cure. Each of these innovative studies use a Stony Brook-developed MRI technique to examine breast tissue and determine quickly and safely if a novel therapy may be effective at preventing breast cancer development. The use of such sensitive MRI equipment allows researchers and doctors to test pioneering interventions quickly so they can offer them to patients as a standard of care moving forward. Such innovation, however, wouldn’t…

Dear Colleagues, Summer seems to fly by.  On May 19th the School graduated more than 250 newly minted social workers in a joyous celebration at the Staller Center.  They have begun the process of studying and sitting for their licensure with the help of our new Alumni L-Fund. Throughout the summer our Admissions staff has been working on admitting and enrolling over 300 new MSW students and over 60 BSW students.  Our new first year curriculum, including the recently adopted hybrid course schedule, is ready to launch.  New Student Handbooks and Field Manuals were published.  We submitted the School’s reaccreditation…

A research team from Stony Brook University and Brookhaven National Laboratory has been studying argon gas, and the group’s findings have been published in Nature Communications. Argon and other noble gases have previously been trapped in three-dimensional porous materials. Prior to the SBU-BNL research, immobilizing these gases on surfaces had only been achieved by either cooling them to very low temperatures to condense them, or by accelerating gas ions to implant them directly into materials. The SBU-BNL research team synthesized a two-dimensional structure and successfully trapped argon atoms inside the nanosized pore structure at room temperature. This achievement will enable…

Scientists have traced the emergence of the modern dog to the domestication of a population of gray wolves that took place in Europe between 20,000 and 40,000 years ago. By analyzing the DNA of two prehistoric dogs from Germany, an international research team led by Krishna R. Veeramah, PhD, Assistant Professor of Ecology & Evolution in the College of Arts & Sciences at Stony Brook University, has determined that their genomes were the probable ancestors of modern European dogs. The finding was published in Nature Communications. Dogs were the first animal to be domesticated by humans. The oldest dog fossils that can…

New research reveals that sulfur dioxide, a major contributor to air pollution, is removed from the air by concrete surfaces. Stony Brook University researcher Alex Orlov, PhD, and colleagues discovered how concrete interacts and eliminates sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Their findings, published in the July edition of the Journal of Chemical Engineering, could be a significant step toward the practice of using waste concrete to minimize air pollution. According to the World Health Organization, as many as seven million premature deaths of people worldwide may be linked to poor air quality and pollution. Sulfur dioxide emissions are among the most common…

Stony Brook-led research into the structure of a key enzyme involved with cell growth regulation could offer important clues to understanding cancer and neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease. The finding, published in PNAS, reveals the first visualization of the enzyme and could provide insight into how the enzyme is activated. The enzyme, neutral sphingomyelinase (nSMase2), is one of the major enzymes that produces ceramide in the body. Ceramides are oil-like lipids that are produced in response to chemotherapy and other cell stresses. The ceramides that nSMase2 produces allow cancer cells to pass DNA and proteins to other cells to change…

In a June 25 episode of Sunday Night With Megyn Kelly, NBC News’ Harry Smith journeyed to Antarctica and spoke with Stony Brook’s Heather Lynch about the signs penguins might be giving us about climate change. Dr. Lynch called penguins the “canaries in the coalmine” of global warming. “All the species on the planet are going to have to deal with climate change,” she said. “It’s not just an Antarctic issue. But these penguins are dealing with it now.” Lynch and her team count the numbers of various penguin species in order to track the impact of climate change. Her…

Is 70 the new 60? A new Stony Brook University-led study  published in PLOS ONE uses new measures of aging with probabilistic projections from the United Nations to scientifically illustrate that one’s actual age is not necessarily the best measure of human aging itself, but rather aging should be based on the number of years people are likely to live in a given country in the 21st Century. The study also predicts an end to population aging in the U.S. and other countries before the end of the century. Population aging – when the median age rises in a country because of increasing life expectancy and…

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