Browsing: Medicine and Research

Is 70 the new 60? A new Stony Brook University-led study  published in PLOS ONE uses new measures of aging with probabilistic projections from the United Nations to scientifically illustrate that one’s actual age is not necessarily the best measure of human aging itself, but rather aging should be based on the number of years people are likely to live in a given country in the 21st Century. The study also predicts an end to population aging in the U.S. and other countries before the end of the century. Population aging – when the median age rises in a country because of increasing life expectancy and…

Every day, more and more cancer patients are surviving and thriving. That was just one of the positive messages on Sunday, June 4, when Stony Brook Cancer Center welcomed 300 courageous people who are living proof that cancer diagnosis and treatment have come far. “Together we can push back on cancer,” declared Yusuf A. Hannun, MD, Director, Stony Brook University Cancer Center and Vice Dean of Cancer Medicine. The audience met his welcome with cheers and applause for the miracle of being alive. More than 1,100 people attended the event, Stony Brook’s 13th annual recognition of this worldwide celebration. Stony Brook…

High-temperature superconductivity offers perfect conveyance of electricity, but it does so at the price of extreme cold and an ever-elusive mechanism. If understood, scientists might push superconductivity into warmer temperatures and radically enhance power grids, consumer electronics, and more—but the puzzle has persisted for more than 30 years. Now, Stony Brook University PhD student and a team of scientists have broken new ground by approaching from a counter-intuitive angle: probing so-called “bad metals” that conduct electricity poorly. The researchers found that “stripes” of electronic charge, which may play a key role in superconductivity, persist across surprisingly high temperatures, shape conductivity,…

A Martian crater is providing more proof that the Red Planet may once have supported life, a Stony Brook geochemist and planetary scientist says in a recently published NASA study. The study led by Assistant Professor Joel Hurowitz offers perhaps the most significant evidence to date that an ancient lake on Mars had all the ingredients of a life-sustaining body of water. Building on the 2013 discovery that Mars’ Gale crater contained a freshwater lake more than 3 billion years ago, Assistant Professor Joel Hurowitz led a team of 22 international scientists using findings beamed to Earth from NASA’s Curiosity…

As the world awaits President Trump’s decision on continued US participation in the Paris Accord, the landmark global warming agreement signed in 2015, Stony Brook researchers continue to pioneer discoveries that shed light on pressing climate issues. Stony Brook’s commitment to collaborative research yields dividends that expand knowledge and create real-world impact in the fields of environmental science and energy. Read about some recent discoveries and initiatives: Climate Change Threatening Humans Through Toxic Algae Spread Caribbean Bats Would Need 8 Million Years to Recover from Extinctions Creating a Sustainable Earth: Batteries Included SBU Study Says Climate Change is Major Factor in…

The John C. Dunphy Private Foundation establishes Cancer Innovation Fund at Stony Brook Medicine The first documented case of cancer dates back to 3000 BC and is described in the Edwin Smith Papyrus, an ancient Egyptian textbook on trauma surgery, as having “no treatment.” Fast forward more than 5,000 years and cancer remains an incredibly resilient and difficult disease to understand, prevent and cure. But we’re getting close. At the Stony Brook Cancer Center, researchers are pioneering studies that are gaining worldwide attention. “Stony Brook is a disciplined and first-class organization that supports a culture of people who work to change…

How smart is your watch? An award-winning paper co-authored by Department of Computer Science assistant professor Xiaojun Bi outlines a method for text entry that could make “smartwatches” as useful as smartphones. Bi’s research, which won a prestigious award at this year’s ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems (ACM CHI), outlined the design, decoding algorithm and implementaion for COMPASS, a rotational keyboard that will be used to enter text into smartwatches without the need for touchscreens. According to the researchers, COMPASS is a text entry method that is based in the bezel of the watch, allowing the user…

Department of Computer Science (CS) chair Arie Kaufman and fellow researchers have been awarded new funding from the National Science Foundation (NSF), paving the way for Stony Brook to become a university partner in the Center for Visual and Decision Informatics (CVDI). Established in  2012, the Center for Visual and Decision Informatics is a National Science Foundation Industry/University Cooperative Research Center (I/URC) that works in partnership with government, industry, and academia to develop the next-generation visual and decision support tools harnessing Big Data. More than five years ago, the National Science Foundation funded the creation of the Center for Dynamic Data Analytics…

Amy and Michael Howard of Center Moriches couldn’t believe when they heard that they were having triplets, but the surprises didn’t stop there.  Shortly after birth, the first time parents found out in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) at Stony Brook Medicine that all three of their babies — Jackson, Hunter, and Kaden — had Craniosynostosis, a congenital premature fusion of one or more sutures on a baby’s skull It’s particularly unusual because Jackson and Hunter, the identical siblings, both had Sagittal Synostosis, while Kaden, the fraternal triplet, had Metopic Synostosis. “Craniosynostosis in itself is not extraordinarily rare; it’s…

One oceanic consequence of climate change is well underway, and it’s likely already having a negative impact on human health, according to a new study led by a professor at Stony Brook’s School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences (SoMAS). “This study demonstrates that the global warming that has already occurred is now impacting human health and our oceans,” Professor Christopher Gobler said. “An important implication of the study is that carbon emission and climate change-related policy decisions made today are likely to have important consequences for the fate of our future oceans, including the spread and intensification of toxic algal blooms.”…

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