Browsing: Faculty/Student Spotlights

Following a highly competitive nationwide selection process, Stony Brook University senior Lydia Senatus ‘18 has been awarded a 2018 Charles B. Rangel International Affairs Fellowship. The fellowship supports extraordinary individuals seeking  to pursue a career in the U.S. Foreign Service.  Funded by the U.S. Department of State and managed by the Ralph J. Bunche International Affairs Center at Howard University, the fellowship provides: Approximately $95,000 in benefits over a two year period to pursue a master’s degree in international affairs; Two internships: Summer 2018: Lydia will work with a member of Congress on issues regarding foreign affairs Summer 2019: The…

The State University of New York Board of Trustees recently approved the appointments of three Stony Brook faculty to the Distinguished Faculty rank. “Each member of the SUNY family appointed to a Distinguished Faculty rank has conveyed their own passion in their field of expertise with students, enriching the educational experience, accelerating research, and impacting lives within SUNY and beyond,” said SUNY Board Chairman H. Carl McCall. “We are proud to honor these individuals for being leaders in their fields, for mentoring students who will go on to contribute to our society, and for pushing the boundaries of research beyond…

The study of objects less than a billionth of a meter, also known as “nanometers,” is a special research discipline that Materials Science and Engineering Professor Alexander Orlov has been working on for years. A major breakthrough in this field has been the emergence of a new generation of consumer products containing nanoparticles, nano-enabled biomedical devices and many other exciting developments straight out of science fiction novels. However, like many scientific breakthroughs, there is hesitation in the implementation of nanotechnology. “It is a very difficult area to describe, as you cannot see nanoparticles with the naked eye,” Orlov explained. “People…

Although filled with tropical life today, the Caribbean islands have been a hotspot of mammal extinction since the end of the last glaciation, some 12,000 years ago. Since people also arrived after that time, it has been impossible to determine whether natural changes or human influence are most responsible for these extinctions. A new study by an international team of scientists, including Stony Brook University Professor Liliana M. Dávalos, reports an analysis of the incredibly diverse “lost world” of Caribbean fossils that includes giant rodents, vampire bats, enigmatic monkeys, ground sloths, shrews and dozens of other ancient mammals. The study, published today in the Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, reveals that the arrival of humans…

As representatives from around the world meet in Bonn, Germany this month to discuss a way forward on the Paris Agreement and decarbonization, a new book on energy transitions by Kathleen Araújo, assistant professor in the Department of Technology and Society in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, sheds light on the experiences of countries managing the transition to low carbon technologies. Low Carbon Energy Transitions: Turning Points in National Policy and Innovation (Oxford University Press) draws on over 120 interviews with scientists, governmental employees, academics, and members of civil society. Araújo focuses on four unique cases: Brazilian biofuels, Danish wind power,…

For his work focusing on the risks involved in deploying fully autonomous computer systems, Romeil Sandhu has been awarded $450K from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), through the Air Force’s Young Investigator Research Program. Sandhu is an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Informatics, jointly administered by Stony Brook’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and School of Medicine. His research could impact autonomous systems for a variety of systems that rely on artificial Intelligence, including self-driving automobiles and drones. Professor Sandhu is one of only 43 scientists and engineers to receive the award, for his proposal addressing 3D Interactive…

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“Heartbeats of Stony Brook,” an outdoor mural conceptualized by Naveen Mallangada ’17, was finally completed at the beginning of September.

Now a medical student, Naveen was able to connect the two hearts of the University with this project.

The beautification project was painted inside the Nichols Road underpass, connecting East Campus and West Campus with two heartbeats. It was mostly complete by April 2016, but planned construction on the hospital side prevented Mallangada from painting the second heartbeat until this semester. Mallangada, now a Stony Brook medical student, felt determined to finish the project as soon as construction was over, finally connecting the two hearts of the University.  

“In between studying for anatomy and biochemistry in the medical school, I squeezed time to finally complete the project,” he explained. “It just ended up that I painted the West Campus heart when I was an undergraduate, and I painted the East Campus heart in medical school. The project inadvertently represents my own transition between the campuses.”

The mural is meant to symbolize a connection between the two “hearts” of the University. “I felt the tunnel should reflect its importance to the students and the University community. I used that heart imagery to literally paint the hearts of campus,” Mallangada said.

The project was a community effort with help from people from all over the University. It’s Mallangada’s second project on campus, after he initiated the transformation of the Tabler Steps from regular stairs into piano keys. That previous experience gave him the tools he needed to undergo the larger project of painting the hospital tunnel.

“With the Tabler Piano Steps I learned the value of getting the word out, of collaborating and connecting with people. I learned to remain determined and persevere with an idea no matter the obstacle,” he said.

Mallangada sees his art as an extension of his mission to improve people’s lives. “As a medical student, your desire is to improve the lives of your patients and to become the best physician possible,” he explained. “I view public art as a form of public medicine, improving our surroundings, providing a message and depth to people’s daily lives, even for a moment.”

A new study from world’s leading lemur expert paints a grim picture for future of dietary specialists like the critically endangered Greater Bamboo Lemur. Human disturbance of tropical rainforests in Madagascar, including wildfires, burning and timber exploitation, have led to reduced rainfall and a longer dry season, further pushing the Greater Bamboo Lemur to the brink of extinction. Findings are published in a new study from primatologist and lemur expert, Patricia Chapple Wright of Stony Brook University, evolutionary biologist Jukka Jernvall of University of Helsinki in Finland, and colleagues. The study is entitled Feeding Ecology and Morphology Make a Bamboo Specialist…

Kara Burnett grew up idolizing Oprah Winfrey. Hoping to emulate the famous talk show host, the Baldwin Harbor, NY resident knew she needed a school with a strong journalism program. At first she wanted to go out of state, but when her parents learned about Stony Brook’s School of Journalism, they urged her to apply. “I knew that if I wanted to graduate without huge loans, and invest that money into studying abroad and going to graduate school, I had to make a decision,” Kara said. She has since been rewarded for that decision. “The intimate class settings and support…

Eric Brouzes, an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation CBET division entitled, “Physical Principles of Magnetic Extraction from Microfluidic Droplets.” This three-year, $300K award will study the extraction of magnetic beads from microfluidic droplets with the translational goal of developing an efficient way to access genetic information of single cells at high speed. These droplets are extremely stable, they act as capsules that do not merge with each other unless directed, and can be precisely controlled at high speed. That approach has proven beneficial in many applications, such…

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