Browsing: Faculty/Student Spotlights

A special reception was held on January 8 for the three grand prize-winning students from Half Hollow Hills High School who won the prestigious 2017 Siemens Competition — the nation’s premier competition in math, science and technology for high school students. Arooba Ahmed, Jiachen Lee and Jillian Parker were honored by the Board of Education along with their mentor, Associate Professor Ken-Ichi Takemaru from Stony Brook University’s Department of Pharmacological Sciences. Also honored was Stony Brook University alum Michael Lake, who is Research Director for Half Hollow Hills School District. In December 2017, the SBU-mentored team was awarded a $100,000…

Professor Zohar Komargodski of the Simons Center for Geometry and Physics will be awarded the 2018 Sackler Prize in the Physical Sciences. The international prize is given at Tel-Aviv University each year, alternatively in the fields of physics and chemistry. The 2018 honor and $100,000 prize will be given to Professor Komargodski and Professor Pedro Viera from the Perimeter Institute in Canada for their research in physics probing Quantum Field Theory – universal language for theoretical physics – in non-pertubative regimes. The prize is intended to encourage dedication to science, originality, and excellence by rewarding outstanding young scientists. “Quantum Field Theory – Novel Developments” is…

Thanks to pioneering work at Stony Brook Medicine, digital solutions are in development for pathology slide specimens — the last major frontier in digitizing medical images. Dr. Joel Saltz, Chair of Biomedical Informatics at Stony Brook Medicine and a board-certified clinical pathologist with a PhD in Computer Science, is at the forefront of this major breakthrough. For more than 20 years, Dr. Saltz and his team, which includes physicians and technologists from Johns Hopkins, Ohio State, Emory and Stony Brook, have been developing digital solutions for pathology slide specimens. His groundbreaking work in digital image viewing and archiving systems for…

Chang Kee Jung, a SUNY Distinguished Professor in Physics, represents a rare breed of scientists who not only understand the densest of subject matter but can break it down in a way that makes it come alive for the lay person.  He has been doing both for a long time. Since arriving at Stony Brook in 1990 from Stanford University, where he conducted various particle physics experiments based on high-energy particle accelerators, he was in the vanguard of recognizing the important role that neutrino physics would play in the subsequent decades. He started a research group called Nucleon Decay and…

Arie Kaufman, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Computer Science, and Clinton Rubin, PhD, Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences at Stony Brook University have been elected as Fellows of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). According to the NAI, election as an NAI Fellow is a high honor bestowed upon academic innovators and inventors who have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions and innovations that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society. Professors Kaufman and Rubin will be inducted as NAI Fellows during…

Significant research in the area of computational power and large-scale application efficiency is being conducted by Professor Barbara Chapman, one of the latest computer science faculty members to receive a National Science Foundation (NSF) funding award. Chapman won the NSF Scalable Parallelism in the Extreme, otherwise known as an SPX award, for her research, Cross-layer Application-Aware Resilience at Extreme Scale (CAARES). The funded research addresses the challenges imposed by future extreme-scale architectures that will require dynamic programming approaches, where different software layers, potentially developed using different programming paradigms, will have to closely interact with each other. “I’m extremely excited to…

Three projects with producer credits for Stony Brook MFA in Film faculty will have their world premieres at the Sundance Film Festival, to be held January 18 to 28, 2018, in Park City, Utah. The narrative feature Colette and television series This Close, both produced by Killer Films’ Christine Vachon and Pamela Koffler, and The Tale, with For Impact Productions’ Simone Pero as a producer, were all selected for screening at the upcoming festival in Utah. “Christine Vachon and Simone Pero have been integral to our program’s original vision and continuing growth,” said MFA in Film Program Director Magdalene Brandeis.…

Two student teams that were mentored by Stony Brook University faculty took first and second place in the prestigious nationwide 2017 Siemens Competition in Math, Science and Technology. The first-place team, mentored by Associate Professor Ken-Ichi Takemaru from the Department of Pharmacological Sciences, was awarded a $100,000 scholarship to be divided among team members Arooba Ahmed of Melville, NY; Jiachen Lee of Dix Hills, NY; and Jillian Parker of Dix Hills, NY, all from the Half Hollow Hills school district. The team discovered that a specific protein not previously recognized in cell division plays a crucial role in the process and could be…

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is one of the most prestigious organizations in the American science realm. With its dedication to supporting colleges throughout the nation, the NSF continues to help advance computer science research at Stony Brook University. Professor Jie Gao is the latest Stony Brook faculty member to earn not one, but two awards from the NSF. Gao has been awarded $250,000 for the NeTS grant (Research in Networking Technology and Systems) along with $100,000 for the Algorithms for Threat Detection (ATD) grant. “We at the Computer Science Department are very proud of Jie for her exceptional work,” said Interim Department Chair Samir Das.…

While skin pigmentation is nearly 100 percent heritable, it is far more genetically complex than previously thought. According to a new study published in Cell, co-authored by Stony Brook’s Brenna Henn, the genetics of skin pigmentation become progressively complex as populations reside closer to the equator, with an increasing number of genes—known and unknown—involved, each making a smaller overall contribution. Researchers from SBU, Stanford University and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard worked closely with the KhoeSan, a group of populations indigenous to southern Africa. They found that earlier studies of the genetics of skin pigmentation are misleading because they rely on…

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