Browsing: Faculty

The National Science Foundation (NSF) is one of the most prestigious organizations in the American science realm. With its dedication to supporting colleges throughout the nation, the NSF continues to help advance computer science research at Stony Brook University. Professor Jie Gao is the latest Stony Brook faculty member to earn not one, but two awards from the NSF. Gao has been awarded $250,000 for the NeTS grant (Research in Networking Technology and Systems) along with $100,000 for the Algorithms for Threat Detection (ATD) grant. “We at the Computer Science Department are very proud of Jie for her exceptional work,” said Interim Department Chair Samir Das.…

While skin pigmentation is nearly 100 percent heritable, it is far more genetically complex than previously thought. According to a new study published in Cell, co-authored by Stony Brook’s Brenna Henn, the genetics of skin pigmentation become progressively complex as populations reside closer to the equator, with an increasing number of genes—known and unknown—involved, each making a smaller overall contribution. Researchers from SBU, Stanford University and the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard worked closely with the KhoeSan, a group of populations indigenous to southern Africa. They found that earlier studies of the genetics of skin pigmentation are misleading because they rely on…

The State University of New York Board of Trustees recently approved the appointments of three Stony Brook faculty to the Distinguished Faculty rank. “Each member of the SUNY family appointed to a Distinguished Faculty rank has conveyed their own passion in their field of expertise with students, enriching the educational experience, accelerating research, and impacting lives within SUNY and beyond,” said SUNY Board Chairman H. Carl McCall. “We are proud to honor these individuals for being leaders in their fields, for mentoring students who will go on to contribute to our society, and for pushing the boundaries of research beyond…

The study of objects less than a billionth of a meter, also known as “nanometers,” is a special research discipline that Materials Science and Engineering Professor Alexander Orlov has been working on for years. A major breakthrough in this field has been the emergence of a new generation of consumer products containing nanoparticles, nano-enabled biomedical devices and many other exciting developments straight out of science fiction novels. However, like many scientific breakthroughs, there is hesitation in the implementation of nanotechnology. “It is a very difficult area to describe, as you cannot see nanoparticles with the naked eye,” Orlov explained. “People…

Although filled with tropical life today, the Caribbean islands have been a hotspot of mammal extinction since the end of the last glaciation, some 12,000 years ago. Since people also arrived after that time, it has been impossible to determine whether natural changes or human influence are most responsible for these extinctions. A new study by an international team of scientists, including Stony Brook University Professor Liliana M. Dávalos, reports an analysis of the incredibly diverse “lost world” of Caribbean fossils that includes giant rodents, vampire bats, enigmatic monkeys, ground sloths, shrews and dozens of other ancient mammals. The study, published today in the Annual Review of Ecology, Evolution, and Systematics, reveals that the arrival of humans…

For his work focusing on the risks involved in deploying fully autonomous computer systems, Romeil Sandhu has been awarded $450K from the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR), through the Air Force’s Young Investigator Research Program. Sandhu is an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Informatics, jointly administered by Stony Brook’s College of Engineering and Applied Sciences and School of Medicine. His research could impact autonomous systems for a variety of systems that rely on artificial Intelligence, including self-driving automobiles and drones. Professor Sandhu is one of only 43 scientists and engineers to receive the award, for his proposal addressing 3D Interactive…

A new study from world’s leading lemur expert paints a grim picture for future of dietary specialists like the critically endangered Greater Bamboo Lemur. Human disturbance of tropical rainforests in Madagascar, including wildfires, burning and timber exploitation, have led to reduced rainfall and a longer dry season, further pushing the Greater Bamboo Lemur to the brink of extinction. Findings are published in a new study from primatologist and lemur expert, Patricia Chapple Wright of Stony Brook University, evolutionary biologist Jukka Jernvall of University of Helsinki in Finland, and colleagues. The study is entitled Feeding Ecology and Morphology Make a Bamboo Specialist…

Eric Brouzes, an assistant professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been awarded a grant from the National Science Foundation CBET division entitled, “Physical Principles of Magnetic Extraction from Microfluidic Droplets.” This three-year, $300K award will study the extraction of magnetic beads from microfluidic droplets with the translational goal of developing an efficient way to access genetic information of single cells at high speed. These droplets are extremely stable, they act as capsules that do not merge with each other unless directed, and can be precisely controlled at high speed. That approach has proven beneficial in many applications, such…

Danny Bluestein, a professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering, has been elected a fellow of the Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES). His award-winning work tackles the dynamics of flow and cellular transport in blood recirculating devices and the diseased cardiovascular system. He is also director of the Biofluids Research Group at Stony Brook University. BMES fellows demonstrate exceptional achievements and experience in the field of biomedical engineering and are encouraged to continue to pursue leadership within the society and to further improve the future of BMES and biomedical engineering. “Professor Bluestein’s work — combining in silico computer simulations with benchtop lab testing — exemplifies…

Two Stony Brook University Department of Physics and Astronomy faculty in the College of Arts and Sciences recently received the Department of Energy (DOE) Early Career Award for their individual research projects related to the discovery of dark energy and dark matter.   Assistant Professor Anja von der Linden was awarded for her project, “Towards Precision Cluster Cosmology with Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST)”; Assistant Professor Marilena Loverde, also appointed in the Yang Institute for Theoretical Physics,  was awarded for “Discovering Dark Energy, Dark Matter, and Neutrino Properties with Cosmic Structure.”  Each will receive $750,000 over five years to develop…

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