Browsing: Faculty

Department of Computer Science Professor Long Lu has received a grant from the U.S. Army Research Office for his latest work on web-mobile integration and security. The professor’s research aims to develop tools and techniques that will enable these integrations to be more secure, and eventually create hardware-assisted protection that will be used in situations involving high-level sensitive information. Despite the fact that web-mobile integration is one of the most widely used and quickly growing models, there have been very few studies done on its security implications. That lack of comprehensive understanding has thus far made it very difficult to…

BY ERIC SCHMID The American Physical Society, or APS, elected two scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory as 2016 APS fellows. Peter Petreczky and Michiko Minty were among the nearly 300 researchers and scientists honored in the 2016 nomination process. “It’s a recognition by your peers throughout the United States that the work you’ve done is impactful as it has been seen and known about outside of your immediate circle of colleges,” Minty, who works in accelerator physics, said. This recognition is not given just any member of the APS. Fellows are nominated by their peers and are elected by society…

The National Science Foundation’s most prestigious award for early-career faculty (CAREER) has been awarded to Fan Ye, Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences. He will receive an award of $450k over the next five years to build the foundation for a future smart environment. “The idea of a smart environment is to embed all kinds of computing, communication, storage, and sensing resources into common objects around you,” Ye explained, sharing examples such as lights, desks, appliances, and other everyday physical objects. “Once you embed such resources into it, you’ll be surrounded by…

BY MICHAELA KILGALLEN AND MAHREEN KHAN Vanity Fair France has named Sonia Harmand, an associate professor, one of the 50 most influential French in the world. “I accepted the prize not only in my name but also the team working with me,” Harmand, a professor in the Department of Anthropology, said. In 2011, Harmand and Jason Lewis, a paleoanthropologist at Rutgers University, made a wrong turn in Kenya and discovered stone artifacts, dating back 3.3 million years. Before Harmand and Lewis discovered the artifacts on the western shore of Lake Turkana, the earliest stone tools only dated back 2.6 million…

Robert D. Hough, PhD, Assistant Professor of Mathematics in the College of Arts and Sciences at Stony Brook University, was awarded the David P. Robbins Prize by the Mathematical Association of America (MAA). Presented once every three years, the award recognizes the author of an outstanding paper in algebra, combinatorics, or discrete mathematics. Dr. Hough’s “Solution of the minimum modulus problem for covering systems,” was published in the Annals of Mathematics. Research for this problem was conducted during Dr. Hough’s tenure at the University of Cambridge. According to the MAA, “Bob Hough stunned the field by showing that for any…

The African wildlife conservation organization Tusk USA will honor renowned paleoanthropologist and conservationist Richard Leakey with the 2017 Tusk Legacy Award at its Wildlife Gala on April 6 at Guastavino’s in New York City. Leakey, professor and chair of the Turkana Basin Institute (TBI), will be recognized for his tireless conservation efforts that reduced poaching in wildlife sanctuaries across Kenya. Leakey partnered with Stony Brook University in 2005 to create TBI, a collaborative, international, multi-disciplinary organization that facilitates scientific research in the Turkana Basin region of northern Kenya. At TBI, he inspires students to become the next generation of anthropologists while supporting further research in the region.…

“Secret Reserves,” an essay by Stony Brook University Journalism Professor Pablo Calvi, made the Best American Essays Series 100 Notable Essays and Literary Nonfiction of 2015. It was also selected as one of the top 31 Notable Travel Writing pieces of 2015. The essay is about the Sápara, a people indigenous to the Amazon rainforest along the border of Ecuador and Peru. In a land as exceptional for its fragile and fiercely guarded biodiversity as for its dwindling population of guardians, the indigenous Sápara are first in line for a new form of extinction. And they are staking the only…

The Stony Brook University Garcia Center for Polymers at Engineered Interfaces, with the help of undergraduates from the Stony Brook Program in Chemical and Molecular Engineering, part of the College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, together with Queens College hosted the 20th Annual Science Open House for High School Students on January 5. The event, which occupies the entire Queens College Science Building, hosts high school students from schools across the New York Metropolitan area, and aims to encourage and inspire them to explore science as a possible career. The program emphasizes empowerment through science regardless of socioeconomic or ethnic background and that…

For more than 22 years, the Suffolk County Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Commission has maintained a commitment to promoting the principles and philosophies of Dr. King. This year, the Commission recognized Dr. Bonita London, Department of Psychology, and Toni Sperzel, Center for Inclusive Education (CIE), as recipients of the 2017 Public Service Award based on their demonstrated record of dedication to civil rights. The two were honored at a luncheon held on Friday, January 13, 2017 at The UpSky Long Island Hotel. Dr. London, a social and personality psychologist, has dedicated her research and scholarship over the past 10…

Hallmarks of cancer progression are uncontrolled proliferation (division) of cancer cells and invasive behavior, leading to the spread of tumor cells throughout the body. Now two Stony Brook University cell biologists, David Matus, PhD, and Benjamin Martin, PhD, have discovered that cell division and invasion are mutually exclusive behaviors. For this novel finding, the Damon Runyon Cancer Research Foundation has awarded the researchers with the 2017 Damon Runyon-Rachleff Innovation Award and a two-year grant of $300,000, followed by another renewable grant of $300,000 for an additional two years to further advance their work. “Cells can’t divide and invade at the same time, and most…

1 2 3 9