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History

  • Program Overview

    Description of the History Department

    The Department of History has a faculty of 30 distinguished researchers and teachers. Each year we admit 6 to 8 students into the doctoral program and around the same number of students into the terminal master’s program. The department currently has approximately 60 full- and part-time graduate students.

    While the department has strength in a number of traditional areas of historical study, it also has a long tradition of comparative, interdisciplinary, and theoretically informed research. The graduate program has been structured around four areas of thematic inquiry—1) Empire, Colonialism, and Globalization; 2) Nation-State, Civil Society, and Popular Politics; 3) Environment, Health, Science, and Technology; and 4) Gender, Race, and Sexuality—to bring these theoretical issues to the fore and insure that our students learn how to apply such concepts as class, gender, race, culture, power, religion and environment in an explicit and sophisticated manner to the study of the past. To further these interests, the department maintains close connections with the Stony Brook Humanities Institute, the doctoral program in Comparative Literature and Cultural Studies, the Women’s Studies Program, Africana Studies, the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Program, and the Center for Global History, as well as the departments from which these programs draw their core faculty.

    The master’s program, which requires students to complete 30 credits of graduate study with a grade of B or higher, allows students to explore the history and historiography of their chosen area of concentration. Students in the master’s program have the option of choosing between a Professional Track and an Academic Track, based on their goals and interests. Students in both tracks follow a course of study similar to that followed by doctoral students during their first two semesters, and the oral examination during the third or fourth semester serves as the capstone experience for the master’s program.

    The Ph.D. program is designed to prepare students to carry out original research and to ultimately pursue a career at the university level. Doctoral students may choose to focus their study on a particular region and period or they may concentrate in one of the thematic areas of study described above, and all students are encouraged to work with faculty in other departments. Full-time students in the doctoral program typically take courses for their first six semesters in the program and take their Oral Examinations at the end of their third year. 

    Students pursuing a M.A. Degree in History must choose one of two tracks, the Professional Track or the Academic Track. The following chart explains the differences between the two tracks:

    Professional Track

    Academic Track

    The professional track allows students to follow as rigorous a curriculum as they wish without requiring them to take courses that are better suited for doctoral students. It is designed for both social studies teachers who need a master’s degree for professional certification and those seeking advanced preparation for careers government service, journalism, and other fields that demand a combination of research, writing skills, and knowledge of the past. This program provides a stronger grounding in history than do master’s programs in liberal studies and teaching.

     

    The professional track is also open to individuals seeking personal enrichment, whether or not history is directly related to their occupation. Students may enter the program in either the fall or spring semester and may enroll on either a full- or part-time basis.

     

    Students in this track can earn their degree either through coursework alone or by choosing to write a 6-credit master’s thesis. The thesis will give students the opportunity to conduct independent research on a topic of interest using primary sources.

     

    Students can also take up to 6 credits of content-based pedagogy courses, and we hope to be able to offer such courses as Teaching American History Through Popular Culture, Introduction to Economics Education, and Teaching Geography.

     

    Students may begin the program either in the Fall or the Spring semester.

    The academic track is designed for individuals who aspire to a career in teaching or writing history at the college level, but who are not yet ready to enter a Ph.D. program. Students in the academic track are required to enroll in the two-semester Core Seminar in historical theory and research and generally follow the course of study of incoming doctoral (Ph.D.) students. Students are only admitted to this track for studies beginning in the fall.

     

    Students in this track are expected to develop a concentration in a region or period, or in an interdisciplinary field, and to conduct research in this area of concentration in the Core Seminar.

     

    As with the professional track, students in the academic track can earn their degree either through coursework alone or by choosing to write a 6-credit master’s thesis.. The thesis will give students the opportunity to conduct independent research on a topic of interest using primary sources.

     

    Students may begin the program only in the Fall semester.

  • Admissions

    Admission to the M.A. and Ph.D. Programs

    In addition to the requirements of the Graduate School, the minimum requirements for admission to the graduate program in history are:

    A. A bachelor’s degree in history or its equivalent with a minimum grade point average of 3.0 (B) in all undergraduate coursework and in history courses.

    B. Three letters of recommendation that address the applicant’s potential to succeed in a rigorous course of graduate study.

    C. Submission of scores from the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test. The subject area test in history is not required.

    D. Students whose first language is not English must submit scores from the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Students must score at least a 550 (paper), 213 (computer), or 90 (iBT).

    With the approval of the dean of the Graduate School and the History Department, a student holding an M.A. degree from another accredited institution may be admitted directly to the Ph.D. program at Stony Brook. In special cases, students who do not have a bachelor’s degree in history or whose GPA does not meet the requirements stated above may be admitted on a provisional basis for M.A. study only. After completing the master’s program, such students may apply for admission to the doctoral program.

    Please note that students are only admitted to the Ph.D. program and the Academic Track of the M.A. program for study beginning in the fall semester; students are admitted to the Professional Track of the M.A. program for study beginning in both the fall and the spring semesters.

  • Degree Requirements

    Requirements for the M.A. Degree in History

    The History Department offers two separate M.A. tracks to meet the differing needs of our students:

    1. Professional Track

    The professional track is designed for both social studies teachers who need a master's degree for professional certification and those seeking advanced preparation for careers government service, journalism, and other fields that demand a combination of research, writing skills, and knowledge of the past. This program provides a stronger grounding in history than do master's programs in liberal studies and teaching. Students benefit from exposure to doctoral students, but are are not required to take courses designed for Ph.D. candidates. 

    The professional track is also open to individuals seeking personal enrichment, whether or not history is directly related to their occupation. Students may enter the program in either the fall or spring semester and may enroll on either a full- or part-time basis.

    Students in this track can earn their degree either through coursework alone or by choosing to write a 6-credit master's thesis. The thesis will give students the opportunity to conduct independent research on a topic of interest using primary sources.

    Students can also take up to 6 credits of content-based pedagogy courses, and we hope to be able to offer such courses as Teaching American History through Popular Culture, Introduction to Economics Education, and Teaching Geography.

    Students must begin the program in Fall semester.


    2. Academic Track

    The academic track is designed for individuals who aspire to a career in teaching or writing history at the college level, but who are not yet ready to enter a Ph.D. program. Students in the academic track are required to enroll in the two-semester Core Seminar in historical theory and research and generally follow the course of study of incoming doctoral (Ph.D.) students. Students are only admitted to this track for studies beginning in the fall.

    Students in this track are expected to develop a concentration in a region or period, or in an interdisciplinary field, and to conduct research in this area of concentration in the Core Seminar.

    As with the professional track, students in the academic track can earn their degree either through coursework alone or by choosing to write a 6-credit master's thesis. The thesis will give students the opportunity to conduct independent research on a topic of interest using primary sources.

    Students must begin the program in Fall semester.

    In addition to the requirements imposed by the Graduate School, the following are required:

    A. Coursework

    The coursework requirements for the Professional Track and the Academic Track differ somewhat, as can be seen in the chart below:

    Professional Track

    Credits

     

    Academic Track

    Credits

     

     

     

    Core Seminar (HIS 524/6 & 525/7)

    6

     

    Three Field Seminars

    9

     

    Two Field Seminars

    6

    Two Theme Seminars

    One Directed Readings

    6

    3

     

    Two Theme Seminars

    One Directed Readings

    6

    3

    The remaining 12 credits can be selected from Field Seminars, Theme Seminars, directed readings and graduate courses offered in conjunction with other departments (e.g. Sociology, Africana Studies, and Cultural Analysis & Theory). There will be an option for a Master's Thesis (6 credits).

    12

     

    The remaining 9 credits can be selected from Field Seminars, Theme Seminars, directed readings and graduate courses offered in conjunction with other departments (e.g. Sociology, Africana Studies, and Cultural Analysis & Theory). There will be an option for a Master's Thesis (6 credits).

    9

    Total Credits

    30

     

    Total Credits

    30

    Additional Notes on Coursework:

    1. Core Seminar (HIS 524/HIS 526, HIS 525/HIS 527: 3 credits each semester): This course provides an intensive, year-long introduction to historical theory and research. It also familiarizes students with the thematic organization of the graduate program. All full-time students in the Academic Track of the master's program, as well as in the doctoral (Ph.D.) program, are required to take this course, which is offered only as a fall/spring sequence, during their first year.

    2. Two or Three Field Seminars (3 credits each): The department offers a number of field seminars designed to familiarize students with the history and historiography of specific regions and periods in US, European, Latin American, and Asian history. Master's students in the Academic Track are required to take two field seminars, while master's students in the Professional Track are required to take three field seminars. A minimum of two field seminars are offered each semester. Topics change regularly, and students are free to choose among the field seminars being offered. Students interested in concentrating in the history of a specific region are encouraged, but not required, to complete both parts of the Field Seminar sequence for that region where available.

    3. Two Theme Seminars (3 credits each): The theme seminars are the heart of the department’s commitment to the theoretically informed, interdisciplinary study of history. Topics, approaches, and instructors vary, but these seminars generally fall within the rubric of our program’s theme clusters: Gender, Race, and Sexuality; Nation-State, Civil Society, and Popular Politics; Empire, Colonialism, and Globalization; and Environment, Health, Science, and Technology. Master's students in both the Professional and Academic Tracks are required to take two theme seminars. A minimum of two theme seminars are offered each semester. Topics change regularly, and students are free to choose among the theme seminars being offered.

    4. Directed Readings for M.A. Candidates (HIS 584/HIS 585, 3 credits each): Three credits of directed readings will normally be taken in the Fall of the initial year, to enable the student to meet regularly with his or her Advisor and address any deficiencies in preparation for the graduate program. The course may be repeated with the same or other members of the faculty as an elective in later semesters.

    5. Three or Four Electives (3 credits each). The remaining 12 credits (for students in the Professional Track) or 9 credits (for students in the Academic Track) can be selected from Field Seminars, Theme Seminars, the graduate courses offered in conjunction with other departments (e.g., Sociology, English, Art History, Africana Studies, Women's and Gender Studies, and Cultural Analysis and Theory), and Directed Readings for M.A. Candidates. Directed Readings may or may not be in connection with preparation for the Oral Exam or for an optional Master's Thesis (see below.)

    B. Oral Examination: By the time the student has completed 24 credits (e.g. fall semester of his/her second year for full-time students), he or she must secure the agreement of two faculty members (one of whom must be the student’s Advisor) to serve on the orals examination committee. The Advisor will examine the student in his or her major geo-political field (Modern Europe, Colonial North America, etc.); the second faculty member will examine the student in a complementary field (usually based on a theme seminar). The exam will be taken at the end of the student’s course of study. At least two months, preferably three, before the student's desired date for the Oral Exam, the student will present the members of his or her orals committee with a preliminary list of books and topics to be examined. Students may enroll in a Directed Readings course (sometimes termed an "Orals workshop") to prepare for the examination. Students are responsible for arranging a mutually acceptable date and time for the exam (and for notifying the Graduate Program Coordinator well in advance so that the necessary paperwork can be processed). The exam will last approximately one hour, and it will be graded as “pass with distinction,” “pass,” or “fail.” In the event of failure, the student may petition to take the exam a second time at a later date.

    C. Master's Thesis Option: Students may elect to write a master’s thesis. While there is no specified length for this, the expectation is that the thesis will be in the range of 40 to 70 pages. Students pursuing this option must enroll in HIS 586 (Orals and Thesis Preparation for M.A. Candidates) and/or HIS 584/585 (Directed Readings for M.A. Candidates). The thesis writing will be supervised by the student’s Advisor, and—for students pursuing this option—a substantial portion of the oral examination will be devoted to the defense of the thesis.

    D. Language Requirement: Master's students with a concentration in European history must pass a written exam in an appropriate foreign language. Students in Latin American history must pass a written exam in Spanish or Portuguese. The other areas of concentration currently do not require a foreign language for the master's degree.

    E. Master's Students Seeking to Enter the Ph.D. Program: Master's students seeking to enter the Ph.D. Program must submit a formal application to the Graduate School. Admission into the Ph.D. program is not guaranteed. Meanwhile, M.A. students are welcome and indeed encouraged to participate in all departmental activities.

    Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree in History

    The Stony Brook doctoral program offers an intensive, far-ranging education, culminating in an original research and writing project. It prepares students for a professional career in higher education, or for jobs in media, government or other fields which rely upon the skills and knowledge of the historian. In addition to acquiring thorough training in a chosen specialty defined by time (medieval, early modern, 18th, 19th, or 20th centuries) and by place (Latin American, U.S., European, Asian or African), students of different periods and regions of the world take many of the same courses, on topics drawn from the department’s thematic areas.  Our innovative approach, now taken by other history departments as a model, prepares students for research and teaching about the past not just for a single corner of the world, but in its relationship and interdependence with other places. At Stony Brook, many courses and much teaching now revolve around fundamental sets of ideas which are continuing to reshape historical scholarship about many times and locales. Our graduate students still receive solid grounding in the national or regional histories and periods of their choosing. Whether Europeanist or Latin Americanist or Asianist or Americanist, graduate students have ample chances to study with faculty in their own geographic specialty, as well as to work with other faculty specializing in the thematic clusters of interest to them. And our thematic emphasis enables them also to think across and beyond these boundaries, in ways that make for cutting-edge scholarship, as well as timely and insightful teaching. Our current thematic clusters are Empire, Colonialism, and Globalization; Nation-State, Civil Society, and Popular Politics; Environment, Health, Science, and Technology; and Gender, Race, and Sexuality (see the department's web page for theme descriptions, as well as information on associated faculty and their research interests).

    The first phase of the doctoral program consists of coursework. During their first year, all students take a Core Seminar that covers fundamental readings in several thematic areas, as well as basic methods of research and historical writing. Early on, students also take Field Seminars in conventional geographic and chronological specialties, Theme Seminars devoted to readings in the department’s topical areas of specialty, as well as a Teaching Practicum. In the second year, they may begin taking Research Seminars, organized around the production and presentation of major research papers. During the third year, all students must take a comprehensive oral examination in their primary and secondary fields. In addition, all students must take the Dissertation Prospectus Seminar, in which they compose and discuss their dissertation projects and prepare preliminary fellowship proposals. Upon satisfactory passage of the required courses, the orals, and any language requirement, students are then “advanced to candidacy.” In the final phase of their doctoral education, students work closely with a faculty Advisor to research and write the Ph.D. dissertation—a book-length manuscript that offers a significant contribution to the historical literature. In accordance with Graduate School rules, the official “time limit” is seven years from a student’s completion of 24 graduate-level courses (whether at Stony Brook or elsewhere) to the defense and submission of the dissertation.

    Course of Study and Program Requirements

    A. Coursework

    Students in the doctoral program are expected to complete three years of coursework distributed in the manner outlined below. All students take the team-taught Core Seminar in the first year. Course requirements also include 2 Field, 3 Theme, and 2 Research Seminars, plus an additional Field or Theme Seminar (depending on the student's academic needs and course availability). At the end of the third year, students take a comprehensive oral examination designed to assess their mastery of the subject matter, conceptual tools, and research skills necessary to undertake independent research for the dissertation. The dissertation is to be a substantial piece of original research completed independently by the student, and all students are required to defend their dissertation orally before their Doctoral Defense Committee at the end of their course of study.

     

    1. Core Seminar (HIS 524/HIS 526, HIS 525/HIS 527: 3 credits each semester): This course provides an intensive, year-long introduction to historical theory and research. It also familiarizes students with the thematic organization of the graduate program. All full-time students in the doctoral program, as well as the Academic Track of the master's program, are required to take this course, which is offered only as a fall/spring sequence, during their first year.

     

    2. Two or Three Field Seminars (3 credits each): The department offers a number of Field Seminars designed to familiarize students with the history and historiography of specific regions and periods. These courses include: Medieval and Early Modern Europe (HIS 501) and Modern Europe (HIS 502); Early American History (HIS 521) and Modern American History (HIS 522); Colonial Latin America (HIS 541) and Modern Latin America (542), all of which are offered on a one- or two-year cycle. In addition, the following Field Seminars are offered in African and Asian history: Introduction to African and/or Asian History (HIS 562), South Asian History (HIS 563), Chinese History (HIS 564), and Japanese History (HIS 565); note that some of these Field Seminars may be offered slightly less frequently. Some Field Seminars are populated with students in the Master of Arts in Teaching program (M.A.T.), as well as with M.A. and Ph.D. students. Students may choose to take either two or three Field Seminars, in accordance with their intellectual interests and needs.

     

    Students choosing to concentrate in the history of Europe, U.S., or Latin America are encouraged to complete both parts of the Field Seminar sequence in their area of concentration. If more survey or focused reading is required in a specific area, students have the option of taking a third Field seminar or a relevant Theme seminar. With the approval of the Graduate Director and Advisor, students may also satisfy their Field Seminar requirements by taking an appropriate course in an outside department or institution.

     

    3. Three or Four Theme Seminars (3 credits each): The Theme Seminars are the heart of the department’s commitment to the theoretically informed, interdisciplinary study of history. Topics, approaches, and instructors vary, but these seminars generally fall within the rubric of our program’s theme clusters: Gender, Race, and Sexuality; Nation-State, Civil Society, and Popular Politics; Empire, Colonialism, and Globalization; and Environment, Health, Science, and Technology. On occasion, students may apply to take seminars in outside departments or institutions (that is, other universities in the NY Consortium) that may serve as a Theme Seminar. There is also some flexibility for those students wishing to take either three or four Theme Seminars. On occasion, students may also wish to “convert” a Theme Seminar into a Research Seminar (by completing the readings and writing a research paper, with the prior arrangement of the seminar professor and the student’s Advisor).

     

    4. Two Research Seminars (3 credits each): One Research Seminar is offered each semester. It gives students the opportunity to carry out individual research projects using primary sources in areas related to their developing scholarly interests. Research seminars are generally taken during the second and third years. Third-year students often use the Research Seminar to begin preliminary work on their dissertations.

     

    5. Supervised Teaching (HIS 581, 3 credits): All students who hold teaching assistantships and are not enrolled in Teaching Practicum (HIS 582; see below) are expected to register for this course, if possible; if this is not possible, the student should notify the Graduate Director.

     

    6. Teaching Practicum (HIS 582, 3 credits): Required of all Teaching Assistants, as well as those expecting to TA for undergraduate courses in the future. It is generally taken during Fall semester of Year 1. This course gives students the opportunity to discuss the pleasures and pitfalls of undergraduate classroom teaching in a large, diverse public university. Stony Brook offers a laboratory for future college teachers to develop and try out “lesson plans,” as well as to broach such universal concerns as classroom authority, student participation, student-teacher relations, the problem of plagiarism, sexual harassment, etc. Students may be required to attend teaching workshops offered by the Graduate School in addition. These workshops, as well as the Teaching Practicum, are also open to students who do not hold teaching assistantships.

     

    7. Dissertation Prospectus Workshop (HIS 695, 3 credits): This course must be taken by all students and should be completed in the Spring semester of Year 3. Students are expected to work closely with their own Advisors during the semester, as they prepare their dissertation plan. By the end of the course, students will produce and present to the History Department a formal Dissertation Prospectus (usually a 15-20 page proposal). The prospectus must be acceptable both to the instructor of the workshop and to the student’s Ph.D. Advisor. Completion of the workshop and written approval of the dissertation prospectus by the student's Ph.D. Advisor and committee members are required for advancement to candidacy. The course grade is S/U.

     

    As part of the coursework taken prior to the qualifying examination, students may also enroll in the following workshops:

     

    8. Directed Readings (HIS 682, 3 credits each): Students who enter the program without a master's degree may choose to take three credits of Directed Readings will normally be taken in the Fall and/or Spring of the initial year, to enable the student to meet regularly with his or her Advisor and address any deficiencies in preparation for the Ph.D. program. In addition, on the rare occasion that a student’s needs are not met by the department’s Field and Theme seminars, he/she may wish to arrange a Directed Readings with an individual faculty member so as to undertake a specific set of readings on a topic of mutual interest.

     

    9. Orals Workshop (HIS 684, 3 or 6 credits): This workshop provides a space for students to work semi-independently in the scholarly literature of their developing fields of specialization. Normally, students enroll in Orals Workshop (for either 3 or 6 credits, depending on their remaining course requirement needs) in the Fall semester of Year 3. To prepare for the Orals, students have to define three areas of specialization (two in their major geo-political field, and one in a comparative field). Ideally, students should develop their Orals book lists and topics on the basis of the most relevant Field and Theme seminars they have taken and in consultation with their Orals committee. Students may use the Orals Workshop to read independently or in small groups, as well as to meet periodically with Orals committee members. All students should make sure they have dress rehearsals before the exam actually takes place. (See below for details on the Oral Examination.)

     

    10. Courses in Other Departments and Institutions: Students are encouraged to take courses in other departments in order to acquire the theoretical tools offered by other disciplines and gain an interdisciplinary perspective on their fields of interest. Many of our students take courses in such departments as Sociology, English, Art History, and Cultural Analysis and Theory, as well as such interdisciplinary programs as Women’s and Gender Studies and Latin American and Caribbean Studies. Such courses should be selected in consultation with the student’s Advisor. In addition, Stony Brook belongs to a NY-area Consortium of universities. Students are welcome to take graduate seminars for credit at Columbia, NYU, or other institutions. The Graduate School has a form for this (what else is new?!), and the student should obtain prior permission from his/her Advisor and the Graduate Director. Whether the outside course is to count for a Field, Theme, or Research course is negotiated on a case-by-case basis.

     

    Below is a sample course of study that might be followed by a first-year doctoral student without a master’s degree who also holds a teaching assistantship. Graduate School regulations stipulate that new students without MA degrees must take 12 credits per semester during Year 1; those students with MA degrees or who have obtained at least 24 credits at the graduate level are required (and permitted) to register for only 9 credits per semester.):

     

    Fall

    Credits

    Spring

    Credits

    Core Seminar I (HIS 524 or 526)

    3

    Core Seminar II (HIS 525 or 527)

    3

    Teaching Practicum (HIS 582)

    3

    Supervised Teaching (HIS 581)

    3

    Theme Seminar

    3

    Theme or Field Seminar

    3

    Field Seminar

    3

    Theme or Field Seminar, or Directed Readings

    3

    Total

    12

     

    12

     

    B. Full-time Status
    Students who have not yet advanced to G4 status (i.e. who have completed fewer than 24 graduate-level credits) are required to register for 12 credits in order to maintain full-time status. Full-time enrollment for students who have achieved G4 status is 9 credits. Students acting as teaching assistants must carry a full-time load (including, if possible, the 3-credit Supervised Teaching, HIS 581). Once a student has advanced to candidacy, s/he must register for 9 credits of dissertation research (HIS 699, HIS 700, HIS 701) each semester until the degree is awarded in order to remain on full-time status.

     

    C. Award of Master’s Degree to Doctoral Students
    Doctoral students who have completed the requirements for the master’s degree may petition the Graduate School to be awarded the master’s degree while continuing in the doctoral program.

     

    D. Foreign Language Requirement
    All students (except native speakers of the language of their field of specialization) must demonstrate proficiency in at least one relevant foreign language before being advanced to Ph.D. candidacy. This is a Graduate School requirement that may not be waived. Minimal proficiency in a language means the ability to translate a given passage clearly and accurately with the aid of a dictionary. Relevant language(s) are determined by the student’s area of specialization.

     

    Proficiency may be demonstrated either through a written exam administered by the department or a satisfactory grade in a graduate language course (e.g., French 500). The in-department exam consists of translating a passage from a scholarly work in History, with the aid of a dictionary. It is administered and evaluated by an appropriate faculty member. The results of the Language Exam must be reported to the department’s Graduate Program Coordinator and entered into the student’s file.

     

    At the discretion of the Advisor, a student may be required to study additional languages as part of his or her degree program. It is the student’s responsibility to establish with her or his Advisor which foreign languages are necessary for the completion of the Ph.D. and to make sure they have completed the language requirement in a timely fashion so that they may advance to candidacy. Ideally, students take their written language exams by the Fall semester of year 3.

     

    E. Oral Examination and Advancement to Candidacy
    By the end of the second year in the doctoral program, each student should name a Ph.D. Advisor (a History Department faculty member who has agreed to serve as the student's dissertation advisor) and, in consultation with that Ph.D. Advisor, name two additional members of the department who agree to serve on his/her Oral Exam Committee. The committee will help the student define his or her examination fields, language requirements, and coursework, as well as monitor the student’s progress on the dissertation. Members of the committee must also review and, once it meets their standards, endorse in writing the student’s dissertation prospectus before the Oral Exam may be scheduled.

    It is the student’s responsibility to coordinate the examination date and time with his or her committee. The examination may not be taken until all University and History Department requirements (including but not limited to the completion of all coursework, the passing of the Foreign Language Requirement, and the written approval of the Dissertation Prospectus by the Ph.D. Advisor and by all committee members) have been met. Students should check with our Graduate Program Administrator, well in advance to make sure their records are up-to-date and to process the paperwork.


    Full-time students are expected to take their Oral Exam no later than the end of the sixth semester of graduate study. The student, in consultation with the examination committee, will arrange the day, time, and place of the Oral Exam. In addition, the student shall present to each member of the examination committee–no later than the middle of the semester that precedes the Ph.D. oral examination–a suggested list of books and topics. Committee members will advise the student of any changes or additional reading that is to be completed for the examination. The Oral Exam usually lasts about 1 ½ or 2 hours and is graded as “pass with distinction,” “pass,” “weak pass,” or “fail.” Students who fail the Oral Exam may petition to take the exam a second time at a future date.

     

    F. Dissertation Committee
    As the doctoral student is near completion of the dissertation, he/she must constitute a four-person Dissertation Defense Committee. The Ph.D. Advisor plus three other faculty members (including one “outside faculty” member) compose the Dissertation Committee. If, in the rare case, a Ph.D. Advisor is no longer willing to serve as dissertation advisor or if the student wishes to work with a new Advisor, the student must identify some other faculty member in the History Department to serve. The new Advisor must declare in writing his/her willingness to serve as dissertation advisor before the student may be advanced to candidacy. Normally, the Ph.D. Advisor meets with the student at least once each semester (or, if the student is not in Stony Brook, will correspond) to discuss progress on the dissertation.

     

    G. Dissertation and Defense
    Following Advancement to Candidacy, students are required to enroll for one credit of dissertation research each semester (whether through HIS 699, HIS 700, or HIS 701, depending on each student's location) until the dissertation defense. Teaching assistants must register for 9 credits of Dissertation Research on Campus (HIS 699).

    The dissertation is the basic requirement for the conferral of the Ph.D. The student must present the completed dissertation in such a way that the dissertation committee has a reasonable period in which to read, critique, and suggest changes to be incorporated into the final version before the dissertation defense. In other words, the completed dissertation MUST be in the hands of the committee at least two full months before the scheduled date of the dissertation defense, so the dissertation committee can have at least a month to read and correct the dissertation and to give the student their written criticisms and suggestions. If the committee is indeed given this proper amount of lead time, committee members' comments must be in the student’s hands one month before the dissertation defense. If the criticisms are not written out, the student can assume the dissertation is approved in the form submitted. The student must answer all written objections and corrections by revising the dissertation to each faculty member’s satisfaction before it is submitted to the Graduate School.

    The Dissertation Committee is composed of four faculty members, including the student’s Ph.D. Advisor and one faculty member outside the field of History or the institution of Stony Brook. The Graduate School must give advance approval of the Dissertation Committee. The defense is also open to interested students and faculty. Please see the Graduate School website for further information on deadlines and regulations concerning dissertation submission and scheduling of the dissertation defense. 


     

  • Facilities
  • Faculty

    Faculty of History Department

    Professors

    Barnhart, Michael, Ph.D., 1980, Harvard University: U.S. foreign policy; 20th-century U.S. history; modern Japan.

    Gootenberg, Paul, Ph.D., 1985, University of Chicago: Modern Latin America (Andes and Mexico); economic, state-formation, commodities, drugs.

    Hong, Young-Sun, Ph.D., 1989, University of Michigan: Modern Germany; social theory; culture and politics in Germany; culture and politics in modern Europe; gender history.

    Landsman, Ned, Ph.D., 1979, University of Pennsylvania: Early American History and Scotland.

    Larson, Brooke, Ph.D., 1978, Columbia University: Colonial and modern Latin America; Andean rural societies; race, ethnicity, and nation-making.

    Lebovics, Herman, Ph.D., 1965, Yale University: Modern Europe; intellectual and cultural history; Germany and France.

    Lipton, Sara, Ph.D., 1991, Yale University: Medieval cultural and religious history, Jewish-Christian relations, gender.

    Marker, Gary J., Ph.D., 1977, University of California, Berkeley: Russian social and intellectual history; history of printing; European labor history.

    Miller, Wilbur R., Ph.D., 1973, Columbia University: U.S. social and political history, Civil War and Reconstruction, crime and criminal justice history.

    Roxborough, Ian, Ph.D., 1977, University of Wisconsin (joint appointment with Sociology): social history of Latin America; modern Mexico; war and the military.

    Schäfer, Wolf, Dr. Phil., 1983, University of Bremen, Germany: history of technoscience, social history, and global history.

    Sellers, Christopher, Ph.D., 1992, Yale University; M.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, 1992: U.S. environmental, industrial and cultural history; history of medicine and the body.

    Tomes, Nancy J., Ph.D., 1978, University of Pennsylvania: American social and cultural history; medicine, nursing and psychiatry, women and the family.

    Wilson, Kathleen, Ph.D., 1985, Yale University: British social, cultural and political, 17th- 19th centuries; cultures of imperialism; gender studies; cultural, feminist, and postcolonial theory.

    Zimansky, Paul, Ph.D., 1980, University of Chicago: Ancient Near East.

    Associate Professors

    Anderson, Jennifer, Ph.D., 2007, New York University: Atlantic history; Early American history.

    Beverley, Eric, Ph.D., 2007, Harvard University: South Asia; colonial and postcolonial studies; Muslim world.

    Cooper, Mary Alexandra ("Alix"), Ph.D., 1998, Harvard University: Early modern Europe/world; history of science, medicine and technology; environmental history; cross-cultural encounters.

    Farmer, Jared, Ph.D., 2005, Stanford University: Environmental history and policy; geography; U.S. cultural history; history of the U.S. West.

    Frohman, Larry, Ph.D., 1992, University of California, Berkeley: European intellectual history; history of welfare and social policy; social studies education.

    Lim, Shirley, Ph.D., 1998, UCLA: Asian American women’s cultural history.

    Newman, Elizabeth Terese, Ph.D., 2008, Yale University: Mexico, ethnohistory, agrarian studies, historical archaeology, zooarchaeology.

    Man-Cheong, Iona, Ph.D., 1991, Yale University: Modern China; Late Imperial China; women and gender; Chinese Diaspora.

    Masten, April, Ph.D., 1999, Rutgers University: U.S. cultural history, 19th century.

    Mimura, Janis, Ph.D., 2002, University of California, Berkeley: Japan.

    Rilling, Donna J., Ph.D., 1993, University of Pennsylvania: Early national U.S. history; business, legal, urban and labor history.

    Shankar, Shobana, Ph.D., 2003, UCLA: African history, religion, urban, health/disease. 

    Zolov, Eric, Ph.D., Ph.D., 1995, University of Chicago: Modern Latin America, U.S.-Latin American relations, popular culture, global 1960s.

    Assistant Professors

    Chase, Robert, Ph.D., 2009, University of Maryland: U.S. history, state and racial politics, African American and Latino/a history, urban history, labor history and working-class culture, civil rights.

    Flores, Lori, Ph.D., 2011, Stanford University: U.S. history; immigration, ethnicity, and civil rights; labor history; Latino history.

    Teplitsky, Joshua Z., Ph.D., 2012, New York University: Early modern Europe 1500-1750, German principalities 1500-1750, diaspora studies.

    Lecturers

    Backfish, Charles, A.M., New York University, 1968: Social studies education.

    Earley, Terry, Ph.D., 1998, New York University: Educational leadership.

    Hinely, Susan, Ph.D, 1987, Stanford University; J.D., 1983, Harvard Law School: European history and women’s history.

    Emeriti Faculty

    Bottigheimer, Karl S., Ph.D., 1965, University of California, Berkeley: Tudor-Stuart England and Ireland; early modern Europe; modern Ireland.

    Cowan, Ruth Schwarz, Ph.D., 1969, Johns Hopkins University: modern science, technology and medicine.

    Garber, Elizabeth, Ph.D., 1966, Case Western Reserve University: Social and intellectual history of science; 19th- and 20th-century physics; European intellectual and social history.

    Goldenberg, Robert, Ph.D., 1974, Brown University: Jewish history and religion in late antiquity; rabbinic literature and exegesis; history of Jewish thought; rabbinic hermeneutics; ancient history.

    Lemay, Helen R., Ph.D., 1972, Columbia University: Medieval and Renaissance intellectual history; paleography; history of science and medicine; women’s history.

    Rosenthal, Joel T., Ph.D., 1963, University of Chicago: Medieval history; medieval England; social history.

    Weinstein, Fred, Ph.D., 1962, University of California, Berkeley: Theory in history; Russian and European history.

    Williams, John A., Ph.D., 1963, University of Wisconsin: British Empire; Africa; the Commonwealth; expansion of Europe.

    Wishnia, Judith, Ph.D., 1978, Stony Brook University: Modern Europe; France; labor history; women’s history.

     



  • Contact

    History Department

    Chairperson
    Paul Gootenberg, Ward Melville Social and Behavioral Sciences Building N-319 (631) 632-7510/-7507

    Graduate Program Director
    Jennifer Anderson, Ward Melville Social and Behavioral Sciences Building N-319 (631) 632-7485 

    Graduate Program Coordinator
    Roxanne Fernandez, Ward Melville Social and Behavioral Sciences Building S-303 (631) 632-7490

    Degrees Awarded
    M.A. in History; Ph.D. in History

    Web Site
    http://www.stonybrook.edu/commcms/history/

    Application
    https://app.applyyourself.com/AYApplicantLogin/fl_ApplicantLogin.asp?id=sunysb-gs

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