European Studies at Stony Brook

 

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/Italian American
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Summer and Fall 2013 European Studies Courses

All courses are 3 credits

Summer Courses

EUR 101-G Foundation of European Culture
The course presents students with the thinking from a variety of disciplines that influenced the development of the diverse national cultures of Europe. Students are exposed to a chronological representation of the major ways that classical Greek, Roman, Judeo-Christian, and Islamic cultures contribute to the making of individual national cultures and identities of the major countries of Europe.
Summer I: MW: : 1:30-4:55 T. Grenkov
 
EUR 201-I Development of European Culture
An introduction of the important literary works from major European cultural and intellectual developments and an examination of their continued influence on the modern world. Readings focus on central texts pertaining to core religious issues, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Modernism and Post Modernism.
Summer II: MW: 6:00-9:25 T.  Grenkov

Fall Courses

CLS 225-B The Classical Tradition
The literature of Greece and Rome has had a profound impact on the West in terms of Philosophy, Literature, Political Theory, and Art. The course will explore the writings of Greece and Rome and show how they affected Western literature and thought. Authors will include Homer and Hesiod, and Greek tragedians Thucidides, Virgil, and Ovid.
MWF: 11:00-11:53 A. Godfrey
 
EUR 101-G Foundation of European Culture
The course presents students with the thinking from a variety of disciplines that influenced the development of the diverse national cultures of Europe. Students are exposed to a chronological representation of the major ways that classical Greek, Roman, Judeo-Christian, and Islamic cultures contribute to the making of individual national cultures and identities of the major countries of Europe.
TuTh: 1:00-2:20 T. Westphalen
 
EUR 201-I Development of European Culture
An introduction of the important literary works from major European cultural and intellectual developments and an examination of their continued influence on the modern world. Readings focus on central texts pertaining to core religious issues, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Modernism and Post Modernism.
Tu-Th: 4:00-5:20 T.  Westphalen
LAT 111  Elementary Latin I
An intensive course designed to prepare the beginning student to translate Latin that may be needed for use in undergraduate or graduate study. Focus of the course is on the fundamentals of grammar and the techniques of translation. No student who has two or more years of Latin in high school or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency will be permitted to enroll in LAT 111 without written permission from the course supervisor.
MWF: 12:00-12:53 A. Godfrey
 
LAT 354-S3  Literature of the Roman Empire
Selected works of Virgil, Horace, Petronius, Tacitus, and Juvenal are translated and examined in their soacian and historical context. The reading and critical works in English is also required.
Prerequisite: LAT 112
Tutorial A. Godfrey
HUG 221-I  German Cinema Since 1945
A survey of contemporary Germany and its political, social, and economic structure, as well as the study of cultural life and institutions, within the context of its historical development, with comparisons to American models and standards.
M:  2:30-3:50 — B. Viola
HUG 321 ​- G: Topics in the Literature of Germany,
A course given in English on a major German author, genre, or literary movement, designed primarily to give students in other disciplines an opportunity to become acquainted with the German tradition. (German majors are admitted by special permission of their advisors, and do the reading and term papers in German.) Semester topic:  "Death and Dishonor"
Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing
Advisory Prerequisites: Two literature courses
TuTh: 2:30-3:50   T. Kerth
HUI 231-D Sex and Politics in Italian Cinema
The cinematic representation of gender, class, and sexual politics in post-World War II Italian films and the relationship of these themes to Italian history, society, and culture are discussed. Films by directors such as Bertolucci, Fellini, and Wertmuller are studied. Readings include selected works of film history, criticism, and theory.
T: 2:30-4:40 / Th: 2:30-3:50 G. Balducci
 
HUI 234-G  Introduction to 20th-century Theater
A study of avant-garde drama through the analysis of texts by Marinetti, Bontempelli, Pirandello, Betti, Beckett, Ionesco, and Tenessee Williams. Important questions such as identity and diversity are discussed from a variety of perspectives within the social, psychological, sexual, and multicultural context of our time.
Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category B or THR 101
TuTh: 4:00-5:20  L. Fontanella
 
HUI 235-G  Sex, Love ant Tragedy in Early Italian Literature
A study of the interaction between the sexes in contrast with man's spiritual needs in the major works of early Italian literature. Dante's Inferno and Purgatorio, Boccaccio's Decameron and Petrarch's poetry will be analyzed.
Remark: Meets English major requirements
Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of DEC category B or equivalent.
TuTh 2:30-3:50 C. Franco / M. Giua
HUI 239-I  Modern Italy
A survey of contemporary Italy and its political, social, and economic structure, as well as the study of cultural life and institutions with comparisons to American models and standards.
TuTh:  2:30-3:50 — M. Mignone
HUR 141-B:  The Age of Empire
A  survey of major Russian writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, including Pushkin, Dostoevsky, and Solzhenitsyn. The course offers a brief history of Russian literary masterpieces in the context of world literature and of major cultural movements such as the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and 20th-century totalitarianism.
MW: 2:30-3:50 I. Kalinowska
 
HUR 232-/EGL 232-I  Rebels and Tyrants
An exploration of literary rebels and tyrants central to Russian and Anglo-American traditions. The subversive tactics of such writers as Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, Sir Walter Scott, Solzhenitsyn, and Salinger are appraised in the light of the dominant social, political and aesthetic systems they confront.
Advisory Prerequisite: One DEC category B course.
TuTh:  10:0-11:20 N. Rzhevsky
  
HUR 249-I  Russia Today
Contemporary cultural trends in terms of their historic social and political context. Recent responses to historical changes such as the break up of the Soviet Union and its relation to the the forces that brought about the Russian revolution, the new economic order, and the search for Russian national identity are explored in literature, the arts, and media.
Tu-Th: 1-00-2:20 J. Bailyn
HUR 341  Russian Literature and the West
A topics course given in English on a major Russian author or literary movement in relation to European or American literature. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes. May be used to satisfy English or comparative literature major elective requirements with permission of major department.
Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing
Advisory Prerequisite: One literature course at the 200 level or higher
TuTh: 8:30-9:50 -- T. Grenkov
 
MVL 241-G Heroes and Warriors
A study of warrior-hero in Western Literature from the Greeks through the Middle Ages.
MW: 1:00-2:20 T. Kerth


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