European Studies at Stony Brook

 

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/Italian American
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Summer and Fall 2012 European Studies Courses

All courses are 3 credits

Summer Courses

EUR 101-G Foundation of European Culture
The course presents students with the thinking from a variety of disciplines that influenced the development of the diverse national cultures of Europe. Students are exposed to a chronological representation of the major ways that classical Greek, Roman, Judeo-Christian, and Islamic cultures contribute to the making of individual national cultures and identities of the major countries of Europe.
Summer I: MW: : 1:30-4:55 T. Grenkov
 
EUR 201-I Development of European Culture
An introduction of the important literary works from major European cultural and intellectual developments and an examination of their continued influence on the modern world. Readings focus on central texts pertaining to core religious issues, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Modernism and Post Modernism.
Summer II: MW: 6:00-9:25 T.  Grenkov

Fall Courses

CLS 113-B Greek and Latin Literature in Translation
Historical and analytical study of the development of classical Greek and Latin literature. Extensive readings in translation include works illustrating epic, lyric, drama, history, satire, and criticism.
MWF: 12:00-12:53 A. Godfrey
EUR 101-G Foundation of European Culture
The course presents students with the thinking from a variety of disciplines that influenced the development of the diverse national cultures of Europe. Students are exposed to a chronological representation of the major ways that classical Greek, Roman, Judeo-Christian, and Islamic cultures contribute to the making of individual national cultures and identities of the major countries of Europe.
TuTh: 7:00-8:20 T. Westphalen
 
EUR 201-I Development of European Culture
An introduction of the important literary works from major European cultural and intellectual developments and an examination of their continued influence on the modern world. Readings focus on central texts pertaining to core religious issues, the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, Romanticism, Modernism and Post Modernism.
Tu-Th: 4:00-5:20 T.  Westphalen
EUR 390-I #NATION, COLONY, MIGRATION
Description available soon
TuTh: 2:20-3:50 P. Carravetta
LAT 111  Elementary Latin I
An intensive course designed to prepare the beginning student to translate Latin that may be needed for use in undergraduate or graduate study. Focus of the course is on the fundamentals of grammar and the techniques of translation. No student who has two or more years of Latin in high school or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency will be permitted to enroll in LAT 111 without written permission from the course supervisor.
MWF: 11:00-11:53 A. Godfrey
 
LAT 356-S3  Late Medieval Latin
Translation and discussion of Latin literature from the 12th to the 16th century. Authors include the Archpoet, Thomas Aquinas, Petrarch, Erasmus, and Thomas More
Prerequisite: LAT 112
Tutorial A. Godfrey
HUG 221-I  German Cinema Since 1945
A survey of contemporary Germany and its political, social, and economic structure, as well as the study of cultural life and institutions, within the context of its historical development, with comparisons to American models and standards.
M:  2:30-3:50 — B. Viola
HUI 231-D Sex and Politics in Italian Cinema
The cinematic representation of gender, class, and sexual politics in post-World War II Italian films and the relationship of these themes to Italian history, society, and culture are discussed. Films by directors such as Bertolucci, Fellini, and Wertmuller are studied. Readings include selected works of film history, criticism, and theory.
Tu:: 2:30-3:50 / Th: 2:30-4:50 G. Balducci
 
HUI 234-G  Introduction to 20th-century Theater
A study of avant-garde drama through the analysis of texts by Marinetti, Bontempelli, Pirandello, Betti, Beckett, Ionesco, and Tenessee Williams. Important questions such as identity and diversity are discussed from a variety of perspectives within the social, psychological, sexual, and multicultural context of our time.
Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. category B or THR 101
TuTh: 4:00-5:20  L. Fontanella
 
HUI 235-G  Sex, Love ant Tragedy in Early Italian Literature
A study of the interaction between the sexes in contrast with man's spiritual needs in the major works of early Italian literature. Dante's Inferno and Purgatorio, Boccaccio's Decameron and Petrarch's poetry will be analyzed.
Remark: Meets English major requirements
Advisory Prerequisite: Completion of DEC category B or equivalent.
TuTh 2:30-3:50 C. Franco / M. Giua
HUI 239-I  Modern Italy
A survey of contemporary Italy and its political, social, and economic structure, as well as the study of cultural life and institutions with comparisons to American models and standards.
TuTh:  2:30-3:50 — M. Mignone
HUR 141-B:  The Age of Empire
A  survey of major Russian writers of the 19th and 20th centuries, including Pushkin, Dostoevsky, and Solzhenitsyn. The course offers a brief history of Russian literary masterpieces in the context of world literature and of major cultural movements such as the Renaissance, the Enlightenment, and 20th-century totalitarianism.
MW: 2:30-3:50 I. Kalinowska
 
HUR 231-I: Saints and Fools
An introduction to literature about the lives of saints and the holy fool tradition in major texts from Russian and English literature.  Emphasis is placed on the ways authors have used fundamental religious values of humility, the transcendent irrational, and kenosis -- Jesus's humbling himself by taking the form of a man -- to comfort their own times.  Authors considered include Charles Dickens, Chaucer, Nikolai Gogol, and Aleksandr Pushkin; films include Murder in the Cathedral and Forrest Gump.
Remark: Crosslisted with EGL 231.
TuTh: 4:00-5:20 t. Grenkov
 
HUR 235-G: Crime and Punishment in World Literature
An exploration of crime and its punishment focusing Dostoevsky's response to intellectual history and to literary depiction of criminals, villains, detectives, acts of violence, and prevalent moral codes.
Prerequisite: Fulfillment of D.E.C. category B.
TuTh:: 4:00-5:20 N. Rzhesvky
 
MVL 241-G Heroes and Warriors
A study of warrior-hero in Western Literature from the Greeks through the Middle Ages.
MW: 1:00-2:20 T. Kerth


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