Samuel Morris

  • Professor

Samuel Morris received his BS in Civil Engineering from Virginia Military Institute in 1965 and his MS in Sanitary Engineering from Rutgers in 1967. He then entered the Army as an Environmental Engineer, becoming the Chief, Environmental Health Engineering Service, First U.S. Army. He left the Army as a Captain. He then returned to graduate school at the University of Pittsburgh in a joint program between the Graduate School of Public Health an the Graduate School of Public and International Affairs. He interrupted his studies to become Assistant Professor of Environmental Health Science at Illinois State University. He then returned to Pitt as a Research Associate and the principle investigator of a Ford Foundation/American Public Health Association grant on health effects of energy systems. He completed his doctorate in 1973.

Dr. Morris than came to Brookhaven National Laboratory in the Biomedical and Environmental Assessment Group, of which he eventually became the head, and later the Deputy Head, Analytical Sciences Division and Deputy Head, Energy Science and Technology Division. While at Brookhaven, he became a adjunct faculty member at Stony Brook and taught statistics, water resources engineering, environmental systems, and health risk assessment. He also was an adjunct at Carnegie Mellon University supervising doctoral student residencies at Brookhaven. Dr. Morris was involved in designing the cleanup of rad-contaminated soils at Brookhaven.

Dr. Morris was Principal Investigator of an EPA-DOE-NIOSH multi-year project of the impact of coal gasification in Kosovo, Yugoslavia, providing liaison among the three US government agencies and five Yugoslav institutions. He was Principal Investigator of a multi-year DOE project developing the energy-environmental-economic model MARKAL-MACRO for use in climate change studies and for training country analysts in the use of the model. Dr. Morris was attached to EPA for four months using this model at EPA in preparation for the Kyoto meetings on Climate Change. Dr. Morris has been a consultant or advisor to the World Health Organization, the United Nations Environment Programme, the National Commission on Air Quality, the Power Authority of the State of NY, and the Corps of Engineers. He was a member of the National Research Council Committee on Epidemiologic Investigations of Air Pollutants.

Dr. Morris took an early retirement from Brookhaven in 1998, in addition to teaching the Health and Environmental Risk Assessment course at Stony Brook, he teaches Environmental Health at an on-line university and has an active consulting practice. Current projects include health effects of mercury emissions from coal-fired power plants and risks associated with liquefied natural gas refueling stations. He is Editor of the Energy Technology Systems Analysis Program of the International Energy Agency and a member of Editorial Board of Environmental Modeling and Assessment. He is a past member of the Governing Board of the Society for Risk Analysis.

Recent publications include:

  • Edelson, M.C., Morris, S.C., Daisey, J.M. 2001. Worker safety and health issues associated with the DOE environmental cleanup program. Proceedings of the WM’01 Conference,Tuscon, AZ, 2001.
  • Lipfert, F.W., Morris, S.C. 2002. Temporal and spatial relationships between age-specific mortality and ambient air quality in the United States: preliminary results for counties, 1960-97.Occupational and Environmental Medicine 59:156-174.
  • Morris, S.C., Goldstein, G.A., Fthenakis, V. 2001. NEMS and MARKAL-MACRO: a comparison of the electricity sector (accepted by Environmental Modeling and Assessment)
  • Lipfert, F.W., Morris, S.C., Wyzga, R.E. 2000. Daily mortality in the Philadelphia area and size-classifed particulate matter. J. Air & Waste Management Association 50:1501-1513.
  • Lipfert, F.W., Morris, S.C. 2002. Temporal and spatial relationships between age-specific mortality and ambient air quality in the United States: preliminary results for counties, 1960-97.Occupational and Environmental Medicine 59:156-174.