William Marderness

William MardernessJob Title: Full-Time Lecturer

Phone: (631) 632-3253

E-mailWilliam.Marderness@stonybrook.edu

Office Location: H-2044

Education:

 

  • Doctor of Philosophy, Master of Arts, English (Comparative Literature), Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New York, 2001
  • Master of Arts, Theology, Fuller Theological Seminary, Pasadena, California, 1993
  • Master of Arts, Bachelor of Arts, English, English, California State University at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, 1991, 1989

Courses Taught:

  • Advanced Analytical and Argumentative Writing (Writing 381; one course)
  • The Bible as Literature (English 261; one course)
  • Christianity (Religious Studies 270; ten courses)
  • Intermediate Writing A (Writing 102; thirty-seven courses)
  • Intermediate Writing B (Writing 103; one course)
  • Introduction to the Writing Process (English Composition 100; two courses)
  • Introductory Writing (Writing 101; twenty-seven courses)
  • Literary Analysis and Argumentation (English 204; one course)
  • Mythology in Literature (English 260; one course)
  • Writing Workshop (English Composition 101; two courses)

Professional Interests: Classical rhetoric and literature, composition, literary theory, mythology

Presentations:

  • “Barthes’s Myth as a Comprehensive Vision.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Association for Philosophy and Literature, London, England, June 5, 2009.
  • “Does Bultmann Demythologize or Remythicize?” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Society for Biblical Literature, Boston, November 25, 2008.
  • “What Is Cliché?” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the SUNY Council on Writing, Stony Brook, New York, April 26, 2008.
  • “Chinese/American Autobiographical Identities.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Modern Language Association, Chicago, December 28, 2007.
  • “Chinese Layered Narrative in the American Classroom?” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, New York, March 21, 2007.
  • “Reading the Narrative between Arts/Media/Politics.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Association for Philosophy and Literature, Freiburg, Germany, June 8, 2006.
  • “Informal Writing, Creative Thinking.” Paper presented at “Getting to ‘Aha!’: Teaching Creativity at SUNY, A SUNY Faculty Conference,” New York, March 31, 2006.
  • “Literacy and Pedagogical Strategies: 1876–1929.” Session chaired at the annual meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication, Chicago, March 23, 2006.
  • “Obedience of Faith: The Intersection of Grace and Law in Paul’s Letters.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Association for Philosophy and Literature, Helsinki, Finland, June 6, 2005.
  • “Heaven and Hell Re-mythicized.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Association for Philosophy and Literature, Syracuse, May 21, 2004.
  • “Longinus’s Sublime: The Representation of the Numinous.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Association for Philosophy and Literature, Leeds, England, May 27, 2003.
  • “Between History and Legend: The Mirabal Sisters of Julia Alvarez.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Association for Philosophy and Literature, Rotterdam, Netherlands, June 4, 2002.
  • “Repeatable Beginnings: Eliade’s Myth as a Semiological System.” Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Association for Philosophy and Literature, Atlanta, May 2, 2001.

Publications:

  • How to Read a Myth. Series in Philosophy and Literary Theory. Amherst, NY: Prometheus Books, Humanity Books, 2009.
  • Review of Between Woman, Man and God: A New Interpretation of the Ten Commandments, by Hagith Sivan. Review of Biblical Literature (November 2008). http://www.bookreviews.org/pdf/4509_5938.pdf.
  • “Edgar Rice Burroughs.” In Facts on File Bibliography of American Fiction, 1866–1918, edited by James Nagel and Gwen L. Nagel with the assistance of Judith S. Baughman, 91–93. New York: Facts on File, 1993.
Program in Writing and Rhetoric • Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5340 • 631.632.7390
Writing Center • 631.632.7405