Events

Spring 2012

Feminist Campus Colloquium

Salander/Blomkvist: Challenging Stereotypes in the Millennium Trilogy
Linda Stein
, artist, and Michael Kimmel, Distinguished Professor, Sociology

Wednesday, January 25, 12:50 pm
Humanities Building 1008


Co-sponsored with the Humanities Institute at Stony Brook


Fall 2011

Tia PalermoSexual Violence Against Women in the DRC: Population-Based Estimates and Determinants
Dr. Tia Palermo, Assistant Professor of Preventive Medicine, Graduate Program in Public Health

Wednesday, September 21, 4:00 pm
Humanities Building 1008

Tia Palermo is an Assistant Professor in the Graduate Program in Public Health, Department of Preventive Medicine.  She holds a Ph.D. in Public Policy and an M.S. in Health Economics from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Her research interests include gender-based violence, gender equity, maternal and child health, and social policy, and she has studied these topics in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America. She was previously a Postdoctoral Fellow at the CUNY Institute for Demographic Research (CIDR) and a Research and Evaluation Associate at Ipas. Tia has also worked and consulted for other NGOs and international organizations, including UNICEF-ESARO, the World Bank, Population Council, and Family Care International.


Gill Frank"Save Our Children": Conservative Politics and Sexual Conflict in the 1970s
Dr. Gill Frank, ACLS Faculty Fellow, Department of History

Wednesday, October 26, 4:00 pm
Humanities Building 1008

Gillian Frank is an ACLS New Faculty Fellow (2011-2013) in the Department of History at Stony Brook University. He received his PhD and MA from the Department of American Civilization at Brown University. Frank’s publications have appeared in The Journal of the History of Sexuality and The Journal of Religion and Popular Culture.

His book manuscript Save Our Children: Sexual Politics and Cultural Conservatism in the United States, 1965-1990 explores how social and political movements redefined the meaning of citizenship and civil rights between 1965 and 1990 by deeming certain political and cultural transformations harmful to children. It concentrates on fiv

interrelated episodes: the 1970 Hard Hat riots and Nixon-era cultural and political constructions of the “permissive society” and “the Silent Majority”; the racial politics of anti-abortion struggles in Michigan in the early-1970s; Anita Bryant’s anti-gay movement, Save Our Children; the anti-pornography feminist organization, Women Against Pornography; and Tipper Gore’s anti-obscenity movement, Parents’ Music Resource Center.

 Co-sponsored with the Humanities Institute Stony Brook.

 

Housekeepers Cooperative

Spring 2011

Si Se Puede! The Struggle for Immigrant Women's Rights on Long Island

March 15th, 5:30 pm
Wang Center Lecture Hall 1

Members of the Unity Housecleaners Cooperative, a project of the Workplace Project in Hempstead, will discuss the situation of Latina immigrant workers, the formation of the first domestic worker cooperative on Long Island, and the struggle to pass the New York Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights, the first of its kind in the US. Joining them will be representatives of the Farmingville Community Support Center who will speak about their organizing efforts in Suffolk County.

Co-sponsored by the Latin American and Caribbean Studies Center

 

Film: Mountains that Take Wing—Angela Davis & Yuri Kochiyama: A Conversation On Life, Struggles & Liberation
Angela Davis and Yuri KochiyamaDiscussion with Directors C. A. Griffith and H. L. T. Quan
Wednesday, March 30th, 12:30pm—3:00pm
Wang Center Lecture Hall 2

An inspiring, historically rich and unique documentary featuring conversations that span thirteen years between two formidable women who share a profound passion for justice. Through conversations that are intimate and profound, we learn about Davis, an internationally renowned scholar-activist and 88-year-old Kochiyama, a revered grassroots community activist and 2005 Nobel Peace Prize nominee. Their shared experience as political prisoners and their dedication to Civil Rights embody personal and political experiences as well as the diverse lives of women doing liberatory cultural work.

Illustrated with rarely-seen photographs and footage of extraordinary speeches and events from the early 1900s to the '60s and through the present, the topics of this rich conversation range from critical, but often forgotten role of women in 20th century social movements to the importance of cross-cultural/cross-racial alliances; from America's WWII internment camps to Japan's "Comfort Women"; from Malcolm X to the prison industrial complex; and from war to cultural arts. Davis and Kochiyama's comments offer critical lessons for understanding our nation's most important social movements while providing tremendous hope for its youth and the future.

Co-sponsored by Africana Studies and Comparative Literature

 

 

Upcoming Events

Spring 2012

Feminist Campus Colloquium

Salander/Blomkvist: Challenging Stereotypes in the Millennium Trilogy
Linda Stein
, artist, and Michael Kimmel, Distinguished Professor, Sociology

January 25, Wednesday 12:50 - 2:10 pm
Co-sponsored with the Humanities Institute at Stony Brook

Humanities 1006

 

 

Women's and Gender Studies • Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5355 • Phone: 631.632.7460
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