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UPCOMING LECTURES 

FALL 2014

 


Rectangular Mango Vitrine with likeness of Mao and standard inscription, 1968-1969Image: Comfort Women Wanted Public Art Projects, Photograph & Video

Artist Talk: Comfort Women Wanted  

With Chang-Jin Lee, Moderated by Prof. Peg Christoff, Asian and Asian American Studies 
Monday, October 27, 2014 at 2:30 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall 1  
Free admission!

A little-known and shocking story from World War II is that of the "comfort women," a euphemism for an estimated 200,000 sex slaves imprisoned to service members of the Japanese Imperial Army. Korean-born artist Chang-Jin Lee will speak about her research and artworks current on view at the Zodiac Gallery. 

About the Speaker

Chang-Jin Lee is a Korean-born American artist who has exhibited internationally in the U.S., Asia and Europe, including an exhibition at The Queens Museum of Art in New York City, the Kunstmuseum Bonn in Germany, and The Incheon Women Artists' Biennale in South Korea. Lee has received numerous awards, including The New York State Council on the Arts Grant, The Asian Cultural Council Fellowship, The Socrates Sculpture Park Fellowship,The Asian Women Giving Circle Grant and The Lower Manhattan Cultural Council's MCAF.

RELATED PROGRAM

EXHIBITION: Comfort Women Wanted (On view from September 18, 2014 to January 10, 2015) 

 

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Rectangular Mango Vitrine with likeness of Mao and standard inscription, 1968-1969Image: Rectangular mango Vitrine with likness of Mao and standard inscription, 1968-69

Gallery Talk: Sanctification of the Mango
Illustrated Lecture by Dr. Alfreda Murck  
Wednesday, November 5, 2014 at 4 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall 1
Free admission!  

In China the summer of 1968 marked a turning point in the Great Proletariat Cultural Revolution (1966-1976). Student Red Guards, who had been the leaders, were by passed while workers were asked to take charge. In August 1968, a Pakistani foreign minister presented to Mao Zedong a crate of mangoes. Mao did not eat them, but sent them to workers who, ten days before, had put down warring factions of Red Guards at Tsinghua University and were continuing to occupy the campus. Greeted with awe and enthusiasm, the mangoes quickly became symbols of Mao’s love for the workers. By October 1968 mangoes were featured in the National Day Parade with the slogan “The working class must be the leaders in everything.”The story of the sanctification of the mango will be told through artifacts, photographs and magazines of the period.

About the Speaker

An historian of Chinese visual culture, Dr. Alfreda Murck last year returned from living for twenty years in Taipei and Beijing. In China, she worked at the Palace Museum and taught at the Central Academy of Fine Arts and Peking University. Dr. Murck contributed to exhibitions such as The Three Emperors, 1662-1795 at the Royal Academy, London, Eccentric Visions: The Worlds of Luo Ping (1733-1799)at the Museum Reitberg Zürich and the Metropolitan Museum. Besides numerous articles, she authored a book titled Poetry and Painting in Song China: The Subtle Art of Dissent (Harvard, 2000). Prior to living in Asia, Alfreda was Associate Curator of Asian Art at The Metropolitan Museum. Dr. Murck received her PhD from Princeton University.

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Co-sponsored by the Confucius institute at Stony Brook University. 

confucius institute logo

RELATED PROGRAMS

EXHIBITION  Mao's Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution (On view from September 18, 2014 to January 10, 2015) 

WORKSHOP   Canning Mao's Mangoes with Chef Paolo Fontana, October 4, 2014 at 1-3 PM   

FILM                Morning Sun (2003) Documentary Film by Carma Hinton, October 23, 2014 at 5-7  PM

 


tea workshopImage: Chinese Actor (1924), by Elizabeth Keith, Color Woodblock Print, 12 1/8 x 16 1/8 inches 

Gallery Talk: Three Alternate Visions of East Asia
By Dr. Kendall Brown
Thursday, November 20, 2014 @11:00 AM-12:50PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall 1
Free Admission! 


In conjunction with the current exhibition, Visual Journals From Asia: The Early 20th Century Prints and Etchings of Paul Jacoulet, Elizabeth Keith & Lilian Miller, this lecture explores the lives, artistic careers and popular appeal of three Western print artists active in East Asia in the middle decades of the 20th century. It complicates orthodox notions of Orientalism by addressing issues of gender, sexual orientation and the joint artistic creation of Westerners and East Asians.

About the Speaker

Dr. Kendall Brown is Professor of Asian Art History at California State University Long Beach. He also recently served as Curator of Collections, Exhibitions and Programs at Pacific Asia Museum. Dr. Brown publishes actively in several areas of Japanese art. He is the author of Quiet Beauty: The Japanese Gardens of North America (Tuttle, 2013), Kawase Hasui: The Complete Woodblock Prints(Hotei, 2003),  Visions of Japan: Kawase Hasui's Masterpieces (2004). Dr. Brown's curatorial and prose contributions to exhibition catalogues include Shin Hanga: New Prints in Modern Japan (LACMA, 1996); Light in Darkness: Women in Japanese Prints of Early Showa (1926-1945) (Fisher Gallery, 1996), Between Two Worlds: the Life and Art of Lilian May Miller(Pacific Asia Museum, 1998), A Japanese Legacy: Four Generations of Yoshida Family Artists (Minneapolis Institute of Art, 2002) and Taisho Chic: Japanese Modernity, Nostalgia and Deco(Honolulu Academy of Arts, 2002). He received a Ph.D. in art history from Yale University.

Ticket Reservation

 

RELATED PROGRAM

EXHIBITION       Visual Journals From Asia: The Early 20th Century Prints and Etchings of Paul Jacoulet, Elizabeth Keith & Lilian Miller (On view from September 18, 2014 to January 10, 2015) 

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Charles B. Wang Center

Stony Brook University
100 Nicolls Road, Suite 302
Stony Brook, NY 11794-4040

Contact Info

Phone: (631) 632-4400
Fax: (631) 632-9503
WangCenter@stonybrook.edu
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