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Upcoming Fall 2016 Lectures

origami lecture

Origami Heaven: Modular Origami & Kirigami with Feltro
Wednesday, November 2, 2016 at 1:00 – 3:00 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I
Free Admission

Experiment with modular origami (folding) and kirigami (cutting) with Feltro, magnetic felt tiles. Feltro is an interactive construction toy and adaptable interior design product designed by Sam Kennedy that can be manipulated to create three-dimensional shapes, models, buildings, and even clothing. Kennedy will speak about the origins of the product’s design and the development of his playful and iterative design process, accompanied with an interactive workshop. All ages are welcome.


About the Speaker

Sam Kennedy earned a B.A. in anthropology from McGill University, where he developed a curiosity for the evolutionary process of designing and fabricating everyday objects. This curiosity remained unabated in his years designing and managing production for a custom sportswear and apparel company. This engagement with product design and the manufacturing process stirred his interest in textiles, soft manufacturing, and how to not only make things, but to make them better. Seeking greater hands-on experience, Kennedy earned degree in industrial design at OCAD University, where he developed Feltro as his final project. He is currently working to bring Feltro to home and educational spaces around the world.

japan center logo



Origami Heaven
Wednesdays & Thursday, October, 5, 12, 13, 19, 26 at 1:00 – 3:00 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall II


arts and crafts conference

Diverse Techniques of Asian Arts and Crafts
Friday, November 11, 2016 at 11:30 AM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

Free Admission

As part of the SUNY Innovative Instructional Technology Grant (IITG), Professor Kyunghee Pyun of the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) is developing a website focused on Asian arts and crafts, complete with video links, podcasts, online lectures, and a database of practitioners in collaboration with other SUNY institutions, such as the Charles B. Wang Center and SUNY Old Westbury's Amelie A. Wallace Gallery.

A group of selected participants, including researchers of Asian art, scholars of Asian American studies, art museum curators, and artists will discuss a design for this website; explain and demonstrate several artistic techniques; and plan a pedagogical application of the project for each institution.

Scheduled Hands-on Workshops
Admission Free and Open to the Public

2:00–2:30 PM     Lacquer by Gen Saratani
2:30–3:00 PM     Chinese Paper Cutting by Xin Song
3:10–3:40 PM     Korean Knots by Karen Ahn
3:40–4:10 PM     Japanese Floral Arrangement by Toyomi Shibahara
(* Please note that workshop schedule is subject to change.)


The conference is sponsored by the SUNY Innovative Instructional Technology Grant (IITG), and co-organized by the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) and SUNY Old Westbury's Amelie A. Wallace Gallery.

FIT logo      SUNY IITG logo


Past Fall 2016 Lectures

painting screens lecture

From Europe to Korea: The Marvelous Journey of Collectibles in Painting
By Dr. Sunglim Kim, Prof. of Art History at Dartmouth College
Thursday, September 29, 2016 at 11:30 AM–1:00 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Theatre

Dr. Sunglim Kim will explore the European origins of the genre of Korean still-life painting known as chaekgeori ("books and things"), and how these European influences were transmitted to Korea through Jesuit missionaries in Beijing, China. She will also examine how Koreans eventually developed the theme in a creative and distinctive manner within their own storied, long-standing painting tradition, making it their own.

About the Speaker

Dr. Sunglim Kim is assistant professor of Korean art history at Dartmouth College. Her scholarship focuses on pre-modern and early 20th-century Korean art and culture. Her research interests include the rise of consumer culture in late Joseon dynasty (1392–1910) and the role of the professional nouveau riche—the so-called Jungin (“middle people”)—in the production, distribution, collection, and consumption of art in 18th- and 19th-century Korea; the shaping of images of Korea and its people during the Japanese colonial period; and Korean female painters in pre-modern and modern periods.


This lecture is presented in conjunction with the current exhibition, The Power and Pleasure of Possessions in Korean Painted Screens and in partnership with the Center for Korean Studies at Stony Brook University.

The Korea Foundation logo      center for korean studies logo



The Power and Pleasure of Possessions in Korean Painted Screens
On View September 29 through December 23, 2016
Charles B. Wang Center Skylight Gallery

Making My Own Book Bag with Korean Chaekgeori Painting
Fridays, October 7, 21, 28 at 1:00 – 3:00 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Chapel


Past Programs

Please visit here to view the past programs.

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Charles B. Wang Center

Stony Brook University
100 Nicolls Road
Stony Brook, NY 11794-4040

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Phone: (631) 632-4400
Fax: (631) 632-9503
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