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UPCOMING LECTURES 

Spring 2015


african monuments lecture

Artist Talk and Video Screening: Mansudae Master Class: African Public Monuments Courtesy of North Korean Artists
By Onejoon Che, Prof. Sohl Lee and Prof. Shimelis Gulema
Wednesday, March 4, 2015, 4 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

Why is it that today, all across Africa, so many statues and monuments are made by North Koreans? South Korean artist Onejoon Che explores this question in his multi-media project Mansudae Master Class. The project includes photographs and videos of massive African public art projects like the Tiglachin Monument (1984, Ethiopia) and African Renaissance Monument (2010, Senegal) made by North Koreans as well as archival research that reveals the geopolitical forces underpinning their construction. The project as a whole presents a glimpse into the power of utopian imagination and socialist fiction. The event will begin with a video screening, followed by an artist talk moderated by Prof. Sohl Lee (Assistant Professo in the Department of Art) and Prof. Shimelis Gulema (Assistant professor in the Department of Africana Studies).  

The lecture is organized by the Center of Korean Studies, SBU Art Department and the Charles B. Wang Center.

sbu art department logo

About the Artists

Che Onejoon (b. 1979, South Korea) has for the past few years investigated the relationship between sub-Saharan African countries and North Korea in an attempt to see the ongoing Cold War on the Korean peninsula from a new geopolitical perspective. Che’s previous projects –– including Texas Project (2004–2007), Townhouse (2006–2010) and Spinning Wheel (2011) ––make visible the hidden and unarticulated sites of South Korea’s tumultuous path to modernity. He has participated in a number of exhibitions in Atelier Hermès, PLATEAU (Seoul), the Palais de Tokyo, and the Musée du quai Branly (Paris), as well as the Seoul Media Biennale (2014) and the Korean Pavilion at the Venice Architecture Biennale (2014). The most recent edition of Mansudae Master Class will be featured in the New Museum Triennial (2015).

Free Admission; RSVP below.

Ticket Reservation 


lee talbot lecture

 Precious Cargo: Chinese Baby Carriers in Global Context
by Lee Talbot, Curator at The Textile Museum at The George Washington University Museum
Wednesday, March 11, 2015, 5PM
Charles B. Wang Center Theatre


Highlighting precious traditions and the culture of baby carriers from Taiwan and Southwestern China, Lee Talbot discusses symbolic meanings behind baby carrier embroidery and also draws parallels between this unique textile form and those of other countries.

 

About the Speaker

Lee Talbot is Curator of Eastern Hemisphere Collections at the Textile Museum in Washington, D.C., where he specializes in East Asian textile history. Before joining the Textile Museum staff he spent two and a half years as curator at the Chung Young Yang Embroidery Museum at Sookmyung Women’s University in Seoul, Korea. His recent exhibitions include Dragons, Nagas, and Creatures of the Deep (2012); Woven Treasures of Japan’s Tawaraya Workshop (2012); Green: the Color and the Cause (2011) and Second Lives: The Age-Old Art of Recycling Textiles (2011). Talbot’s publications include chapters on China and Korea in History of Design: Decorative Arts and Material Culture, 1400-2000 (Bard Graduate Center/Yale University Press, 2013); Threads of Heaven: Textiles in East Asian Ritual and Ceremony (Sookmyung Women’s University Press, 2006); Art by the Yard: Women Design Mid-Century Britain (The Textile Museum, 2010); and articles on various aspects of decorative art and design history.

Free Admission; RSVP below.

Ticket Reservation

RELATED PROGRAMS

EXHIBITION
Love and Blessings: The Art of Baby Carriers
Collection from the National Museum of Prehistory of Taiwan
On View March 11 - July 15
Skylight Gallery


japanese gardens lecture

Quiet Beauty: Japanese Gardens in North America and Long Island
by Dr. Kendall Brown
Saturday, March 14, 2015, 1PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

This lecture explores the long history of Japanese gardens in North America, connecting the evolution of garden styles and meanings to stages in U.S.-Japan political and cultural relations. It also examines how the illustrious history of private and public Japanese gardens on Long Island connect to the larger context of American history.

The talk will conclude with a discussion about the major changes in the social function of Asian gardens in North America in the 21st century.

A book signing will follow the lecture; books will be available for purchase.

 

About the Speaker

Dr. Kendall Brown is Professor of Asian Art History at California State University Long Beach. Dr. Brown is also a leading figure in the study of Japanese gardens in North America. His most recent book, Quiet Beauty: The Japanese Gardens of North America, was published by Tuttle in 2013. It expands on his earlier work, Japanese-style Gardens of the Pacific West Coast(Rizzoli, 1999). He recently published the lead essays in the book One Hundred Tears in the Huntington’s Japanese Gardens: Harmony with Nature (2013), which addresses the history of the Japanese gardens at the Huntington Botanical Garden and Library. Dr. Brown is President of the Board of the North American Japanese Garden Association. He received a Ph.D. in art history from Yale University.

Free Admission; RSVP below.

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ramen lecture

 Lecture: How Did Rāmen Become Japan’s ‘National Food’ (Kokuminshoku)?
by Dr. George Solt
Tuesday, April 14, 2015 at 2:30 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall 1


Why did rāmen achieve national symbolic status in Japan during the 1990s, and what can be gleaned about the relationship between food, mass media, and labor by studying this transformation? In attempting to address these questions, the talk will consider the connection between the macro-economic shifts affecting the Japanese economy in this era and the transformation in the cultural milieu associated with the consumption of rāmen. The aim is to identify the logic behind the transformation of a food custom associated with a specific subgroup into a national tradition.

 

About the Speaker

George Solt is an assistant professor in the History Department at New York University. He received his Ph.D. in the History of Modern Japan from the University of California San Diego in 2009. His work focuses on the cultural history of modern Japan, looking at how shifts in dietary habits have been linked to transformations in international politics, labor practices, and national identity. His first book, The Untold History of Ramen: How Political Crisis in Japan Spawned a Global Food Craze, was published in February 2014 by the University of California Press. He is currently completing a manuscript on Indian cuisine and independence in Japanese history.

Free Admission; RSVP below.

Ticket Reservation

RELATED PROGRAMS

EXHIBITION
The Everyday Joys of Japan: Paintings By Jiro Osuga
On View March 11 - July 15
Jasmine Gallery

CRAFT WORKSHOP
Japanese Flower Arrangement with Toyomi Shibahara
Wednesday, March 25, 2015, 1PM
Chapel
 

CULINARY WORKSHOP
Make your Own Japanese Rāmen with Chef Mamie Nishide
Wednesday, April 15, 2015 @ 1-2:30 PM
Chapel


tibet buddhist print lecture

 Tibetan Buddhist Printing from the Derge Parkhang
by Dr. Patrick Dowdey
Thursday, April 23, 2015, 4 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall 1


In conjunction with Pearl of the Snowlands: Tibetan Buddhist Printing from the Derge Parkhang, exhibition curator Patrick Dowdey offers a history of Derge and discusses the serendipitous survival of the nearly 300-year old Derge Sutra Printing House and its importance to the people of this region of Eastern Tibet.

 

About the Speaker

Patrick Dowdey is the curator at the Mansfield Freeman Center for East Asian Studies and an adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Wesleyan University

Free Admission; RSVP below.

Ticket Reservation

RELATED PROGRAMS

EXHIBITION
Pearl of the Snowlands: Tibetan Buddhist Printing From The Derge Parkhang
On View March 11 - July 15
Zodiac Gallery


silk road lecture

 Food and China's Silk Road: Influences to and from the West
by Dr. Jacqueline M. Newman
Wendesday, May 6, 2015 at 1 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Theatre

 

Dr. Newman discusses the East-West cultural exchanges that occurred on the Silk Road through the medium of food.  Cultural exchange through food began in the city of Xian, China and continued on through the Mediterranean and beyond.  A food tasting will follow Dr. Newman’s presentation, featuring recipes from the Jacqueline M. Newman Chinese Cookbook Collection, part of Stony Brook University Libraries' Special Collections. Composed of more than 4,000 rare and scarce English-language cookbooks and unique research materials, it is the world's largest collection of its type. Copies of the recipes will be provided to guests.

Co-sponsored by Special Collections of the University Libraries, The Confucius institute and the Charles B. Wang Center.

confucius logo

About the Speaker

Dr. Jacqueline M. Newman is an emeritus art history professor of Queens College and the founder and editor of the award-winning magazine Flavor and Fortune which is the first and only American, English-language quarterly about Chinese food and dietary culture. In 2002 Dr. Newman made a significant gift of 4,000 Chinese cookbooks, culinary magazines and related audio-visual materials to Stony Brook University Libraries Special Collections. It is the largest collection of its type in the world.

Free Admission and Free Tasting; RSVP Required for Guaranteed Seating.

Ticket Reservation

 

 


 

Past Programs

Please visit here to view the past programs.

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Charles B. Wang Center

Stony Brook University
100 Nicolls Road, Suite 302
Stony Brook, NY 11794-4040

Contact Info

Phone: (631) 632-4400
Fax: (631) 632-9503
WangCenter@stonybrook.edu
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