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Upcoming Spring 2018 Films

I Can Speak film

I Can Speak
Thursday, March 8, 2018 at 6:00 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Theatre

(2017 | 120 minutes | Drama/Comedy | Directed by Kim Hyun-seok)
Free Admission!

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Discussion and Q&A led by Prof. Heejeong Sohn, Assistant Director of the Center for Korean Studies at SBU.

An elderly Korean woman constantly files complaints with her municipal office about the wrongs she sees around her each and every day. Along the way, she forms an unlikely friendship with a junior civil service officer, who begins to teach her English. As he and his student grow closer, the civil servant realizes the real reason behind why this relentless elderly woman wants to learn English and comes to be one of her most ardent, important supporters. Though the film is a comedy, the film does not shy away from discussing the deeper, still sensitive topic of Korean “comfort women,” women and girls forced into sexual slavery by the Imperial Japanese Army in occupied Korea before and during World War II.

Presented by the Center for Korean Studies at Stony Brook University.

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Factory Complex film

Factory Complex
Wednesday, April 4, 2018 at 4:00 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Theatre

(2016 | 92 minutes | Documentary | In Korean, with English subtitles | Directed by Im Heung-soon)
Free Admission!

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Discussion and Q&A led by Prof. E. K. Tan and Prof. Mireille Rebeiz from the Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature.

The winner of the Silver Lion at the 2015 Venice Biennale, Im Heung-soon’s powerful documentary is both an artful exposé that examines the nature of exploitation and a lyrical ode to the female working poor. Factory Complex provides a rare insight into the world of working women and their ongoing struggles, as hard-won earnings and workers’ rights are swallowed up by a rapidly modernizing society.

The film is presented as a part of the Human Rights Film Festival by the Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature, and funded by the Presidential Mini-grant for Departmental Diversity.

 

 

 

Out of Focus film

Out of Focus
Wednesday, April 11, 2018 at 4:00 PM
Charles B. Wang Center Lecture Hall I

(2017 | 88 minutes | Documentary | In Mandarin, with English subtitles | Directed by Shengze Zhu)
Free Admission!

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Discussion and Q&A led by Prof. E. K. Tan and Prof. Mireille Rebeiz from the Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature.

This documentary offers a harsh and unsettling portrait of poverty and urbanism through the sobering perspectives of “migrant children” in modern China. These children were originally from rural areas but have since moved to Wuhan, as their parents chase work and the possibility of a better life in the most populous city in central China. Many of the children fell in love with the bustling city at first, a huge change from the quiet, tranquil countryside existences they previously lived. They grow ambitious about the bright futures the big city could provide them.

The film is presented as a part of the Human Rights Film Festival by the Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature, and funded by the Presidential Mini-grant for Departmental Diversity.

 

 

 

Taste of Cement film

Taste of Cement
Wednesday, April 18, 2018 at 4:00 PM
Charles B. Wang Center | Lecture Hall I

(2017 | 85 minutes | Documentary | In Arabic with English subtitles | Directed by Ziad Kalthoum)
Free Admission!

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Discussion and Q&A led by Prof. E. K. Tan and Prof. Mireille Rebeiz from the Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature.

In Beirut, Syrian construction workers build a skyscraper. At the same time, back in Syria, their houses are being shelled into rubble. Though war and armed conflict have quieted in Lebanon, the Syrian civil war still rages on. The Syrian workers often find themselves locked in the building site, not allowed to leave until after 7 p.m. To make their lives even harder, the Lebanese government has imposed night-time curfews on all refugees. The only contact with the outside world for these Syrian workers is the hole through which they climb out in the morning to begin a new day of work. Cut off from their homeland, they gather at night around a small TV set to get news from Syria. Tormented by anguish and anxiety, suffering and deprived of the most basic human and workers’ rights, they nevertheless hope for a different, better life.

The film is presented as a part of the Human Rights Film Festival by the Department of Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature, and funded by the Presidential Mini-grant for Departmental Diversity.

 

 

 

 


Past Programs

Please visit here to view the past programs.

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Charles B. Wang Center

Stony Brook University
100 Nicolls Road
Stony Brook, NY 11794-4040

Contact Info

Phone: (631) 632-4400
Fax: (631) 632-9503
WangCenter@stonybrook.edu
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