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Charles B Wang Center

Community Yoga Workshop

New Schedule Through August 9, 2012

yoga pose

Please join us for multi-level yoga classes (appropriate for beginners to advanced students) designed to bring mind, body, and spirit into alignment. This is a hatha yoga class. Introduced by Yogi Swatmarama, a sage of 15th century India, traditional Hatha Yoga represents opposing energies: hot and cold (fire and water, following similar concept as yin-yang), male and female, positive and negative and attempts to balance mind and body via asana (poses), pranayama (breath control), and the calming of the mind through relaxation and meditation. Please wear comfortable clothing and bring a mat.
Suggested $5 donation for instructor.
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 4:30 – 5:45, now through August 9, 2012

Wang Center Room 102

For more information email wangcenter@stonybrook.edu
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The Wang Center Recommends

Living River: The Ganges
Sunday, July 29 at 4pm


Award-winning environmental film about The Ganges River screens @ Huntington’s Cinema Arts Centre
 
Real-to-Reel: Documentary Film Series  Sponsored by Ginger & Stu Polisner. This program is partially funded by Suffolk County Executive’s Office & National Endowment for the Arts
In Person: Filmmaker VINIT PARMAR and music score composer PREMIK RUSSELL TUBBS
 
Living River, the award-winning environmental documentary about India’s sacred Ganges River will screen with its filmmaker Vinit Parmar and music score composer Premik Russell Tubbs on Sunday, July 29 at 4pm in the Real-to-Reel Documentary Series at Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave, Huntington. 631-423-7610 www.CinemaArtsCentre.org
 
Click HERE to BUY TICKETS    Groups of 10 or more are eligible for member rates: Call 631-423-7610
$10 Members / $15 Public. Includes reception. Tickets can be purchased online, www.CinemaArtsCentre.org at the box office during theatre hours or by calling Brown Paper Tickets at 1-800-838-300
 
The Ganges River nourishes the soul and washes away sins of millions who bathe in the river and drink from it. But what happens when the river is polluted? How has a holy river become unholy by those who use it? The Ganges, the iconic river of India supports 400 million people everyday. Volunteers clean the river only to find the river is still polluted. This is their story, following the journey of hope to the death and cancers that follow, revealing a controversy riddled with denials, disbelief, and damage: 25 years of delays and excuses that pollute the river and choke the nation. What is the price of saving the Ganges or the 5,000-year old culture it supports? http://www.cinemaartscentre.org/event/living-river/
 
More about the movie:
Living River is a groundbreaking and up-close look at the pollution that’s been an ecological scourge troubling the revered Ganges River in India.
 
The film delivers as yet an unexplored and authentic view of the river and the people struggling to compel change. With unprecedented access, the film brings to light an age-old industry of leather production in transition, bringing in USD$4 Billion to the Indian economy at a cost of degradation of the environment and the health of the residents. Does the end justify the means? This film illustrates the irony of Hindus profiting from the skin of "holy" cows while polluting the “sacred” Ganges River.
 
The exposed water pollution in India is a red flag for fresh water rivers around the world suffering from endemic problems of improper and inadequate treatment plants, illegal activities by chemical industries along riverbanks, improper oversight and weak implementation of government regulatory agencies, corruption, and lack of public awareness.
www.livingriverfilm.com/
 
About the Guest Speakers
Director/Producer
Vinit Parmar, Esq., began his film work as a sound mixer in New York fifteen years ago after making the transition from an established legal career of seven years. He works professionally as a sound mixer for features, shorts, and commercials, and continues to direct his own documentary films. He loves to teach film production courses as a full-time tenured faculty member of the Film Department at Brooklyn College as part of the City University of New York.
 
He is also currently producing and directing ONLY ONE CHILD: THE FANGS’ STORY, about the Fang family’s three siblings separated by their parents as they hide to avoid detection under the One-Child Policy. This project began as a Fulbright-Hayes Scholarship in 2006 on Women, Family and Social Change.
 
He is currently in production for QUEST FOR LIGHT, shot partly in the exotic and off-grid, ancient Sundarbans, as well as Brooklyn, about the many ways a Brooklyn resident inspires and learns from Indian villagers to practice traditional and renewable energy techniques to become sustainable in Brooklyn.
 
He can be reached by email at reeldocfilm@yahoo.com
 
Original Music Composition
Premik Russell Tubbs is a composer, arranger, producer and an accomplished multi-instrumentalist performs on various flutes, soprano, alto and tenor saxophones, wind synthesizers, and lap steel guitar who has performed many times at Cinema Arts Centre.
 
Premik has worked with Carlos Santana, Whitney Houston, Herbie Hancock, John McLaughlin, Ravi Shankar, Narada Michael Walden, Clarence Clemons, Ornette Coleman, Jackson Browne, Jean-Luc Ponty, Lonnie Liston-Smith, Sting, Billy Joel, and James Taylor, just to name a few. He is equally adept in pop, R&B, jazz, world and experimental genres.

 

PREVIOUSLY

Rangoon at the Clurman Theater

Watch our very own SUNITA S. MUKHI, Director of Wang's Asian And Asian American Programs, in the world premiere of Rangoon written by Mayank Keshaviah and directed by Raul Aranas. Rangoon tells of a family of Indian emigres who must deal with seductions of American life, while trying to keep their heritage alive. Funny and tragic— a quintessential 21st century American tale.

Presented by the Pan Asian Repertory Theatre.

May 25 - June 17, 2012.

Tickets and information »

 

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