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Past Exhibitions

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Fall 2014

Lotus: Shiva Ahmadi
September 18, 2014 — January 10, 2015
Jasmine Gallery

shiva ahmadi lotus

Image credit:
Shiva Ahmadi
Lotus, 2014 (Video still)
Single-channel video installation
Edition 2 of 5
Courtesy of the artist and Leila Heller Gallery, New York

Lotus is a video animation by the Iranian artist Shiva Ahmadi, commissioned by the Asia Society Museum in New York City and inspired by two statues of the Buddha held in their collection. Ahmadi’s work reflects on the subjects of social trauma and religious and economic corruption in Iran and the surrounding region. It draws on her experience of the destruction and chaos wrought by the Iraq War (2003 – 2011).

 

About the Artist

Shiva Ahmadi (born 1975, Tehran) currently lives in the United States. She received her BFA from Azad University, Tehran; MA and MFA degrees from Wayne State University and Cranbrook Academy of Art. She is a painter who works not only on two-dimensional surfaces, but also on oil barrels, which function as both content and surface in her work.

She was nominated for an Altoid Award by the New Museum, New York, in 2008, and received a Kresge Artist Fellowship in 2009. Her work was reviewed in The Boston Globe, 2007; The New York Times, 2008, 2009, 2010; Art in America, 2009; and The National, UAE News, 2012. She  has taught at the Birmingham Bloomfield Art Center, Birmingham, Michigan; University of Michigan, Ann Arbor; and Wayne State University, Detroit. Currently she teaches at University of Michigan.

 

RELATED PROGRAMS

PERFORMANCE  The Life of Buddha, September 25, 2014 at 7 M 

LECTURE  Artist Talk by Shiva Ahmadi, October 2, 2014 at 11:00 AM-12:50 PM 

 

Visual Journals from Asia 
The Early 20th Century Prints and Etchings of Paul Jacoulet, Elizabeth Keith & Lilian Miller
September 18, 2014 — January 10, 2015
Skylight Gallery

jacoulet, adversairesIntercontinental travel, communication, and cultural exchanges have become routine in the age of globalization — yet only a century ago, Westerners with in-depth experience about Asia and Asian cultures were few and far between. Visual Journals From Asia presents etchings and woodblock prints by Paul Jacoulet (France, 1896-1960), Elizabeth Keith (UK, 1887-1956) and Lilian May Miller (USA, 1895-1943), three artists in the early twentieth century who spent significant parts of their lives and careers in Asia, including visits to Japan, China, Mongolia, Korea, the Philippines and the islands of the South Seas. This exhibition explores distinctive ways in which these artists' works were shaped by their experiences of travel and cross-cultural encounters, and raises broader questions about intercultural lives and perspectives.

Organized by Jinyoung Jin, Associate Director of Cultural Programs at the Charles B. Wang Center, the exhibition was made possible through the generous loan from Dr. Young-dahl Song Collection, and support from the Japan Center at Stony Brook University. 

japan center logo

RELATED PROGRAM

LECTURE   Three Alternate Visions of East Asia by Dr. Kendall Brown, November 20, 2014 at 11:00 AM-12:50 PM 

 

Mao's Golden Mangoes and the Cultural Revolution
September 18, 2014 — January 10, 2015
Theatre Lobby Gallery

Mao's Mangoes

The mango became a fixture in the repertoire of official propaganda for approximately one year beginning in the tumultuous summer of 1968. That summer marked a turning point in China’s Cultural Revolution (1966-76), when the long hostility between ideological factions of the Red Guard had finally erupted into open conflict. In an effort to contain the conflict, Mao ordered the formation of “Worker-Peasant Mao Zedong Thought Propaganda Teams.”

On August 4, 1968, only ten days after the formation of these propaganda teams, Mao Zedong was given a gift of several dozen mangoes by Pakistan’s foreign minister, Mian Arshad Hussain. As a symbolic gesture of support for the working class, Mao ordered that the mangoes be sent to the propaganda teams. The mango was thus transformed into a token of Mao’s benevolence toward Chinese workers, and was treated with near-religious veneration. Workers lined up to see and sniff the mangoes, in awe even when the mangoes showed the inevitable signs of decay. One factory boiled their mango in a huge pot of water, so that each worker could share a spoonful of Mao's blessing. Other factories made wax replicas which were distributed in glass vitrines and displayed with pride and reverence in workers’ homes. The mangoes (and wax or plastic replicas) were shipped around the country; giant papier-mâché mangoes were featured on floats in the National Day parade; and images of the mango were emblazoned on mass-produced posters, fabrics, cigarette packages, and enamel ware.

Organized by Jinyoung Jin, Associate Director of Cultural Programs at the Charles B. Wang Center, the exhibition was made possible through the generous support of Dr. Alfreda Murck and the Rietberg Museum in Zurich, Switzerland and the Confucius Institute at Stony Brook University.

confucius institute logo


READ MORE 

"Chairman Mao's Mangoes" at chineseposters.net »
"How China came to worship the mango during the cultural revolution," from the London Telegraph »

RELATED PROGRAMS

WORKSHOP   Canning Mao's Mangoes with Chef Paolo Fontana, October 4, 2014 at 1-3 PM

FILM                Morning Sun (2003) Documentary Film by Carma Hinton, October 23, 2014 at 5-7  PM

LECTURES       Sanctification of the Mango: Illustrated Lecture by Dr. Alfreda Murck, November 5,  2014 at 4 PM

Comfort Women Wanted
September 18, 2014 — January 10, 2015

chang-jin leeZodiac Lobby Gallery

Chang-Jin Lee
's public art project Comfort Women Wanted brings to light the memory of 200,000 young women, known euphemistically as comfort women, were systematically exploited as sex slaves in Asia during World War II. This exhibition draws on Lee's revelatory interviews with surviving comfort women from Korea, China, Taiwan, Indonesia, the Netherlands and the Philippines. This forced gathering of women to serve the Imperial Japanese Army as sex slaves was organized on a scale not seen before in modern history, and is considered the largest case of human trafficking in the 20th century.

Featuring seven prints and video by Chang-Jin Lee, Comfort Women Wanted to bring light to this abominable WWII instance of massive organized violence against women and attempts to create a constructive dialog for the future. It recognizes the place of comfort women in world history, and increases public awareness of the general subject of sexual violence against women during wartime.


ABOUT THE ARTIST
Chang-Jin Lee is a Korean-born American artist who has exhibited internationally in the U.S., Asia and Europe, including an exhibition at The Queens Museum of Art in New York City, the Kunstmuseum Bonn in Germany, and The Incheon Women Artists' Biennale in South Korea. Comfort Women Wanted has been presented in NYC of Times Square, Lincoln Center, the Flatiron District, Union Square, Koreatown, Chinatown, Little Tokyo, and in Chelsea in collaboration with The New York City Department of Transportation's Urban Art Program in 2013. 


READ MORE
Watch excerpts from Chang-Jin Lee's Comfort Women Wanted video here »
Chang-Jin Lee's website »

RELATED PROGRAM

LECTURE    Artist Talk by Chang Jin Lee, Moderated by Prof. Peggy Christoff, October 27, 2014 at 2:30 PM 

 

Luscious Peonies by Seongmin Ahn
September 18, 2014 — January 10, 2015

Seongmin Ahn's "Lollipop Peony"Garden View Gallery 

Peonies are a national floral emblem of China. They have been cultivated for at least 1500 years. These lush, rounded blooms with slender, elegant stems have great symbolic and cultural significance across East Asia, including Korea and Japan where they have strong associations with prosperity and friendship. They are regarded as omens of good fortune and happy marriage.

Noted artist Seongmin Ahn incorporates these richly symbolic blossoms in her paintings as part of her exploration of identity as "a Korean-American immigrant with dual values in both cultures." These portraits also use images, patterns and techniques extracted from minhwa (art of the people), a form of Korean decorative folk painting that was particularly popular during the Chosŏn period (1392–1910). Ahn merges the bright colors, simple lines, and flat composition of minhwa naturally with elements of American pop art, adding another cross-cultural dimension to her work.


ABOUT THE ARTIST

Brooklyn-based artist Seongmin Ahn is a recipient of a grant from the Pollock Krasner Foundation. She has exhibited nationally and internationally, including at the Delaware Center for the Contemporary Arts, the Queens College Art Center, Gallery Ho, the White Wall Gallery, and the Gomez Gallery. Ahn has also taught Asian traditional painting at various institutions, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Queens Museum of Art, the Art Students League, the Voelker Orth Museum, the Creative Center for Women with Cancer, and the University Settlement. Ahn holds a Master of Fine Arts degree from the Maryland Institute College of Art.


READ MORE
Seongmin Ahn's website »
Profile of Seongmin Ahn at artasiaamerica.org »


RELATED PROGRAM

WORKSHOP    Hands-On Painting with the Artist, Seongmin Ahn, October 7 & 8, 2014 at 1-4 PM

 

Spring 2014

seas of blue exhibitionSeas of Blue: Asian Indigo Dye

Skylight Gallery
March 12 – July 27, 2014

Celebrating indigo both as a color and as a meaningful link to past and current design practices, Seas of Blue: Asian Indigo Dye is a site-specific installation of traditional and contemporary indigo-dyed textiles from India, Indonesia, Japan, and Korea. Indigo is one of few natural blue dyes, and has historically been both an important commodity and a fixture in textile art and design. Exploring and evoking indigo's traditional associations with wealth, truth, authority, peace, and spirituality, Seas of Blue features works that integrate indigo dye methods into innovative designs with vivid compositions.

With works on loan from Galeri Batik Jawa, SRI(Brooklyn), Annapurna Mamidipudi and contemporary textile artists including Leonie Castelino,  Wonju Seo, and Merdi Sihombing. Co-curated by Laretna T. Adishakti (Associate Professor of Universitas Gadjah Mada, Indonesia), Annapurna Mamidipudi (South Indian textile expert), and Jinyoung Jin (Associate Director of Cultural Programs, Charles B. Wang Center)

Press Coverage:
April 13, 2014 The New York Times Art Review
"Seeing Asian Cultures, Through an Indigo Lens"

March 13, 2014 Stony Brook Independent Art Review
"The Wang Center's Art of Asia: Indigo Textiles, Breathing Cell Phones and Asian Super Villains" 

 

works from the exhibition

  • Seas of Blue: Intro Panel
  • Jacket Designed by Merdi Sihombing
  • Hand Painted Indigo
  • Hand Painted Indigo
  • Indonesian Batik, Indian Indigo, Indonesian Ulos By Merdi Sihombing
  • Installation view of Seas of Blue at Charles B. Wang Center
  • Indonesian Batik, Indian Indigo, Indonesian Ulos By Merdi Sihombing
  • Indian Indigo Textiles
  • Pojagi by Won-Ju Seo
  • Pojagi by Won-Ju Seo
  • Pojagi by Won-Ju Seo
  • Indonesian Ulos by Merdi Sihombing


comics exhibitionMarvels and Monsters: Unmasking Asian Images in U.S. Comics, 1942-86

Theatre Lobby Gallery
March 12 –  July 27, 2014

Marvels and Monsters: Unmasking Asian Images in U.S. Comics, 1942-1986 showcases a selection of potent and indelible images of Asians and Asian Americans in mainstream comics from four defining decades of American history. The images are placed in historical context and in a discourse with contemporary Asian American writers and creators including Ken Chen, Larry Hama, David Henry Hwang, Vijay Prashad, and Gene Luen Yang. The exhibition also contains elements designed to encourage direct engagement with the archetypes, such as life-sized cutouts that allow visitors to put themselves "inside the image" and an installation called "Shades of Yellow" that matches the shades used for Asian skin tones in the comics with their garish PantoneTM color equivalents.

Drawn from William F. Wu’s comic book collection--the largest archive of American comics books featuring images of Asians and Asian Americans -- at New York University's Fales Library & Special Collections, the exhibition is curated by Asian Pop columnist Jeff Yang and the Asian/Pacific/American Institute at NYU. The loan of the exhibition to the Charles B. Wang Center was made possible by the support of the Presidential Mini-Grant for Diversity Initiatives and by Stony Brook University Libraries.

University Library Logo

About the Curator

Jeff Yang, the curator of Marvels and Monsters, is a veteran communications professional whose career in media and marketing has spanned over a decade and a half. Since 2011, he has written the weekly "Tao Jones" column for the Wall Street Journal Online. Yang has authored and edited a number of bestselling books, including Eastern Standard Time; I Am Jackie Chan: My Life in Action (the international action hero's official autobiography); Once Upon a Time in China; and the new graphic novel collection, Secret Identities: The Asian American Superhero Anthology.

 

WORKS FROM THE EXHIBITION

  • Title Panel
  • Installation view: "The Alien," "The Kamikaze," and "The Lotus Blossom"
  • Installation view: "The Manipulator," "The Temptress," and others
  • Installation view: "Shades of Yellow" and "Beyond Stereotypes"
  • Installation view: "Shades of Yellow" and "Beyond Stereotypes"

boundless fantasy exhibitionBoundless Fantasy: Multimedia Art from East Asia

Zodiac Lobby Gallery
March 12– May 31, 2014

With an array of outstanding media art from East Asia, Boundless Fantasy explores the relationship between lived experience and fantasy in the current era of mixed reality. Using cutting-edge computer-generated objects, materials, and techniques – including kinetic sculpture, interactive installation, and ferrofluid art – these artworks engage with the cultural encounter between meditative experience and technology, inviting us to ruminate on the fantastical possibilities of that encounter and to discover the connections between the seemingly very different domains of the real and the imagined. This exhibition welcomes us to engage and ignite our limitless minds and spirits, immersing ourselves in a flow of sensations that propels us towards boundless fantasy.

With contemporary media artists including Minha Yang, Sachiko Kodama, Wang Yuyang, Wu Juehui, and duo artists Ujoo+Limheeyoung. Co-curated by Doo Eun Choi (Independent Curator) and Jinyoung Jin (Associate Director of Cultural Programs, Charles B. Wang Center). Co-sponsored by the Confucius institute at Stony Brook University.

In partnership with the School of Intermedia Art, China Academy of Art

SIMA logoconfucius institute logo

 

WORKS FROM THE EXHIBITION

  • Meditation 2014
  • Meditation 2014
  • Meditation 2014
  • Meditation 2014
  • Meditation 2014
  • Meditation 2014
  • Meditation 2014
  • Silence of the Wolf: The Secret Keeping Machine
  • Silence of the Wolf: The Secret Keeping Machine
  • Silence of the Wolf: The Secret Keeping Machine
  • Nice Engine: Fantasy Stimulating Machine
  • Offline Eye
  • Offline Eye / WiFi Organs
  • Offline Eye / WiFi Organs
  • Offline Eye / WiFi Organs
  • Offline Eye / WiFi Organs
  • Mistake Creature
  • Mistake Creature
  • Morpho Tower_Gold
  • Morpho Tower_Gold
  • Morpho Tower_Silver
  • Ferrofluid Apple

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Charles B. Wang Center

Stony Brook University
100 Nicolls Road, Suite 302
Stony Brook, NY 11794-4040

Contact Info

Phone: (631) 632-4400
Fax: (631) 632-9503
WangCenter@stonybrook.edu
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