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Immigration Policy Under the New Administration

Visa and Immigration Services' Resources
For international students, faculty, staff, and scholars seeking assistance or guidance regarding his or her immigration status, Visa and Immigration Services (VIS) is ready and willing to assist in every way possible.  Advisors are available to discuss specific issues or questions during business hours Monday-Friday8:30-5:00.

Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
9:30am - 1pm
By Appointment
9:30am - 1pm
By Appointment
9:30am - 1pm
Walk-In Hours
9:30am - 1pm
Walk-In Hours
No Advising
1pm - 4:30pm
By Appointment
1pm - 4:30pm
By Appointment
1pm - 4:30pm
By Appointment
1pm - 4:30pm
By Appointment
No Advising

After business hours, please email your questions to VIS@stonybrook.edu, which will be continuously monitored by VIS staff. Emails sent to this address should include your name, student ID number, and contact information. As additional updates and information are available, VIS will update this webpage.


Office Location: Melville Library, E5310

Website: stonybrook.edu/visa
Phone: 631.632.4685
Email: VIS@stonybrook.edu

 

Update on Travel Ban - 6/26/2017

In a June 26, 2017 decision, the U.S. Supreme Court partially granted the government's request to stay the preliminary injunctions. The decision, however, contains an important exception that upholds the injunction for individuals "who have a credible claim of a bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States." Most students and scholars, therefore, should continue to be exempt from the 90-day bar. The situation remains fluid.

The Court gives the following examples of individuals who would likely have the required "bona fide relationship" with a U.S. entity, and therefore would remain exempt from the 90-day ban: Students who have been admitted to a U.S. school; Workers who accept an offer of employment from a U.S. employer; and  Lecturers invited to address an American audience.

Based on these examples, an international student from one of the six affected countries who is already in the United States should be able to leave for the summer and return. Similarly, students who have been admitted to U.S. universities and who now are applying for visas should be able to enter the country. But much may be left up to the discretion of State Department consular officers at U.S. embassies and consulate, and Customs and Border Protection officers at ports of entry.

Update on Court Litigation on Travel Ban - 5/25/2017

The 4th Circuit Court in Richmond, VA has upheld the district court’s preliminary injunction, which will continue to block the travel ban nationwide.  More information can be found here.

Temporary Restraining Order Issued- 3/15/17

On March 15, 2017 the U.S. District Court in Hawaii issued a nationwide temporary restraining order on the revised entry ban, preventing the Government from enforcing the new executive order.  The University is closely monitoring the situation and will provide updates on this page as available. 

Information on the New Executive Order: "Protecting the Nation From Foreign Entry Into the United States", March 6, 2017

The University is aware of the new Executive Order issued by the White House yesterday. The new executive order applies to foreign nationals from the six affected countries -- Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen; Iraq has been removed from the list.

SBU faculty, scholars and students from the affected countries currently in the U.S. can remain in the U.S. and travel domestically without risk.  Individuals from these 6 countries with valid, multiple entries should be able to travel internationally and return to the U.S. under this Executive Order.  Individuals from the affected countries with single entry and/or expired visas should not travel outside the U.S. for the duration of this executive order.   We recommend anyone from these six countries contact Visa and Immigration Services prior to arranging travel outside of the United States.

Despite the updates to the executive order, the impact on higher education remains significant. Through organizations such as the AAU and the APLU, we will continue to make our voices heard. Please share your stories with us about how this new Executive Order is impacting you and your work. These stories are crucial to our advocacy efforts.

For a comprehensive list of questions and answers about the new Executive Order, please see this Fact Sheet and Q&A published on the Washington Post website.

As always, the dedicated team in the Office of International Academic Programs stands prepared to help respond to questions. For international students, faculty, staff, and scholars seeking assistance or guidance regarding his or her immigration status, Visa and Immigration Services (VIS) is ready and willing to assist in every way possible. Advisors are available to discuss specific issues or questions during business hours Monday-Friday, 8:30-5:00. 

After business hours, please email your questions to VIS@stonybrook.edu, which will be continuously monitored by VIS staff. Emails sent to this address should include your name, SBU ID number, and contact information. As additional updates and information are available, VIS will update this webpage.

Additional Resources available to students:

The Graduate School
Procedural accommodations are available for students whose degree progress is affected by the restrictions under the Executive Order.
To review those resources, click here

Office of the Dean of Students
Student Activities Center, Room 222
631.632.7320

Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS)
Student Health Center, 2nd Floor
631.632.6720 (24/7 hotline)

 


Stony Brook University Takes Action


Additional Resources & Links


Stony Brook University Immigration Law Seminar: February 1, 2017




President Stanley's Remarks, 2.1.17 Rally 

Vahideh, welcome back to your Stony Brook University family. We are so pleased to have you back safe and sound. There are about 80 students and faculty from the 7 countries listed on the White House Executive Order at SBU and thousands across the country. All of the 80 are here for the noble purpose of pursuing knowledge or generating new knowledge through research and scholarship. All were previously vetted by and approved for entry by the United States government. And like the 4400 other international students here, all are vital and valuable contributors to our university and valued members of the Stony Brook University Community.

The White House Executive Order upended the status of those 80 students and faculty, and fundamentally changed the rules. Several students were caught in its effects, one is still unable to return to Stony Brook. And, of course, the Order was based on classifying applicants based on their country of origin or religion. I know I do not need to remind you that this form of discrimination is fundamentally opposed to the core values of Stony Brook University and the State of New York. We are a campus that is committed to diversity, inclusiveness and creating an environment that is welcome to all, regardless of race, ethnicity, ability, gender, age, sexual orientation, country of origin or religion. And we stand by that. We are doing all we can to help our students deal with their individual situations and are supporting our congressional delegation and many other institutions and associations in their efforts to find a way to get the Executive Order overturned. And we will continue to do that.

Vahideh's release was a welcome victory but there is still much to be done to reverse the damaging impact of this Order. Not just for the thousands of individuals from the 7 countries named, but for all the international students, scientists, engineers, who want to come to the United States for the best higher education opportunities in the world. We, as a University, and we as a country, rely on recruiting the best and brightest students in the world to come to the United States to study, and succeed. In New York alone, our 114 thousand international students contribute more than $3.9 billion dollars and create nearly 47,000 jobs. These students and scientists are critical to the innovative society we need in the 21st century. We discourage and exclude them at our peril.

In closing, we will work tirelessly to preserve the academic excellence of Stony Brook, which includes having a diverse faculty, staff and students, and a welcoming and safe environment for all who come to this great University. And that most definitely includes our international students and faculty.


A message from President Stanley regarding the Executive Order signed by President Trump on January 27, 2017.

Dear Campus Community,

In November I shared a message with the campus community expressing the University’s unwavering commitment to diversity -- anchored in our strong values of access and inclusiveness -- and to creating a campus environment that welcomes all. I want to reaffirm that the University is resolute on this stance. President Donald Trump’s recent Executive Order (see full text in this New York Times  report) places a moratorium on issuing any visas to citizens of Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen or to those who were born in one of these countries for the next 90 days. During this 90-day period, we advise current international students or scholars from these countries not to travel outside the United States unless absolutely necessary. Even after the 90-day period is complete, we are not sure how the visa or port of entry requirements may change and we are urging caution.

Stony Brook University is experiencing the full effect of this order firsthand, as the President of our Graduate Student Organization, Vahideh Rasekhi, pursuing a PhD in Linguistics, was detained at JFK Airport after arriving from a layover flight in Ukraine en route from visiting her family in Iran. The order apparently went into effect after her travels began. Fortunately Vahideh was not forced to leave, and we have been told that she will be released later today. As this Executive Order is being interpreted by immigration authorities, I want to provide you with information and to offer support, as Stony Brook labors through the new rules governing visas and entry to the United States.

If you have a specific issue or immediate question related to the Executive Order, please contact the Stony Brook University Visa and Immigration Services Office (VISO) located in Room E5310 of the Melville Library. Representatives will be on hand during business hours Monday-Friday,8:30-5:00. After business hours, please email your questions to VIS@stonybrook.edu, which will be continuously monitored by VISO staff. Emails sent to this address should include your name, student ID number, and contact information. As additional updates and information are available, VIS will update stonybrook.edu/visa. All updates will also be posted to the Stony Brook University Visa and Immigration Services Facebook page.

There are additional campus resources which are available to assist you, including the Counseling Center, staff within the Office of Student Affairs, and the Employee Assistance Program. Please feel free to contact any of these offices as listed below:

Visa and Immigration Services
Melville Library, E5310
Website: stonybrook.edu/visa
Phone: 631.632.4685
Email: VIS@stonybrook.edu

Office of the Dean of Students
Student Activities Center, Room 222
Phone: 631.632.7320
Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS)
Student Health Center, 2nd Floor
Phone: 631.632.6720 (24/7 hotline)

Employee Assistance Program
W0505 Melville Library
Phone: 631.632.6085
Email: eap@stonybrook.edu
EAP Coordinators are available by appointment between 
7:30AM and 3:30PMMonday through Friday. After hours services are available through the NYS EAP 24 hour hotline (800.822.0244).

Stony Brook University is a leading global university devoted to excellence and innovation. Our commitment to the entire campus community is to continue to dedicate our efforts to maintaining this standing now and in the future.

Samuel L. Stanley Jr., MD
President

Stony Brook's Unwavering Commitment

11/18/16

To the Campus Community,

The issues of the day, including concerns about the future of undocumented students, and what it might mean for DACA recipients (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals), are having a galvanizing effect on our campus and broader community. Diversity of perspectives, thought and understanding serves as a foundation of Stony Brook’s academic enterprise and helps our students become citizens of the world.

I want to reaffirm Stony Brook University’s unwavering commitment, which is anchored in our strong values of diversity, access, and inclusiveness, to creating a campus environment that welcomes all. Our Stony Brook University Plan for Equity, Inclusion and Diversity provides a roadmap for the many ways that we are working to create inclusive campus, classroom, and community climates. We value the contributions of all of our students, staff and faculty, and know that the diversity of thought, background and experience at Stony Brook enriches our campus in so many ways.

In light of our community's expressed concerns and in keeping with our values as outlined above, I would like to take this opportunity to reassure you that I have been, and continue to be, a staunch supporter of the DREAM Act and of DACA. In fact, today I signed on to a Statement in Support of the DACA Program and Our Undocumented Immigrant Students along with college and university presidents from across the country.

At Stony Brook University, we do not request or require immigration status as part of the admissions process, nor is immigration status a factor in student housing decisions. We do not share private information; once a student is enrolled we protect student confidentiality in line with federal and state law; and, our University Police Department does not inquire into nor record the immigration status of students or other persons unless they have been arrested. Also, it is important for us to understand that US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) policy characterizes colleges and universities as "sensitive locations" -- places where enforcement actions should not occur outside of extraordinary circumstances.

As we move forward as a unified but diverse campus community, it is critical that the University remains a place where the free exchange of ideas must be safeguarded but done in a way that respects our differences. Let’s continue working together in creating a strong and united Stony Brook Community.

Samuel L. Stanley Jr., MD
President

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