PUBLIC OPINION AND AWARENESS SURVEYS


 

National Threat and Terrorism Survey [view publication]

In early October 2001 four Stony Brook University professors in the Department of Political Science teamed up to conduct a national survey of American reactions to the events of 911 with support from the National Science Foundation. A national sample of over 1,500 Americans were interviewed in the months after 911. The team was later joined by Professors Marcus and MacKuen to extend the study (again with NSF funds) to examine public support for a possible war with Iraq in October of 2002. These individuals were interviewed again during the war in 2003. Results of the study have been published in major political science journals and edited book volumes, and Professor Huddy has shared the findings with officials in the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Copies of academic papers from the survey can be found here


 

Americans’ Racial Attitudes and Reactions to Hurricane Katrina [view publication]

This was a national telephone survey of Americans' attitudes towards contemporary race relations; respondents were interviewed at 3 time points as part of a national panel. The third interview concerned white and black Americans’ reactions to Hurricane Katrina. Research findings from this project have appeared in a number of major academic journals. 


 

Survey of Political Ideology of Long Island Residents

This study gauged the opinions of a random sample of Long Island residents on a variety of political and social issues, as well as subjects’ political ideology.  A brief follow up study was conducted to examine how opinions change or remain the same over time. The study was conducted in the Spring of 2000 for a professor and a doctoral candidate in the Stony Brook University Department of Political Science.


 

Survey of New York State Residents’ Racial Attitudes [view publication]

A public opinion study of a random sample of New York State residents explored attitudes towards race and other social and political issues. The survey was conducted in the summer of 2000 for Dr. Leonie Huddy and Dr. Stanley Feldman of the Department of Political Science at Stony Brook University.


 

Social Network Composition and Prejudice Stability over Time

A survey of 442 adults conducted in 2 phases: first, participants reported their views on gays and gay marriage, and members of their social network; participants were re-interviewed 6 months later to assess the stability of their views toward gay marriage.  This study was conducted for a Stony Brook University Department of Political Science researcher and funded by the Vice President for Research at Stony Brook University through the Seed Grants for Survey Research Program.


 

Confronting Justifications for Foreign Intervention

A national RDD survey was conducted with 217 respondents examining the conditions under which they would support or oppose military intervention in foreign conflicts. The survey was conducted for an Economics researcher at Stony Brook University and funded by the Vice President for Research at Stony Brook University through the Seed Grants for Survey Research Program. 


 

Ambivalent Partisanship and Democracy [view book description]

A University of Minnesota Department of Political Science researcher, previously with the Stony Brook University Department of Political Science, and his colleagues asked 810 randomly selected Long Islanders how they form their political judgments. The researchers were interested in how people politically reason given their partisan affiliation, political identity, and party's policies.


 

Information and Awareness of Social Security

A national survey of American adults focused on public knowledge of Social Security rules and the influence of this knowledge on their financial retirement planning. This study was conducted for a Stony Brook University Economics researcher and funded by the Vice President for Research at Stony Brook University through the Seed Grants for Survey Research Program. 


 

Attitudes towards Multiculturalism

CSR conducted a pilot survey of 56 African Americans/Blacks and 59 European Americans/Whites on their views toward colorblindness, multiculturalism and polyculturalism approaches to diversity within American society.  This survey was conducted for a Stony Brook University Department of Psychology researcher and funded by the Vice President for Research at Stony Brook University through the Seed Grants for Survey Research Program.


 

Attitudes toward Mental Illness

A John Jay College Psychology Professor and clinician asked 800 New York State residents their perception of mental illness as part of the Pulse of New York State Poll in 2011. RDD sample was used.


 

Effect of Disorder Name on Recommendation for Treatment

As part of the Pulse of New York State omnibus poll, a SUNY, Binghamton Psychology researcher wanted to know if disorder name effected respondent recommendation for treatment. RDD sample was used.


 

Center for Survey Research • Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-4392 • Phone: 631.632.4377 • Fax: 631.632.1538