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Teacher and student in classroom in front of computer

Why Teach Coding?

Everyone needs to know how our digital world works. Children and teenagers who learn how to code also learn how to solve problems, how to be creative, and how to work on teams. Yet few opportunities are available for teachers who want to learn how to teach this valuable skill set.

Stony Brook is pleased to offer two courses designed to help instructors learn how to teach coding to K-12 students: 

  • Web Development for Teachers Front end development (HTML 5, CSS, Javascript); participants build a website
  • Mobile App Development: Back end development; participants code a basic Android application

The courses may be taken separately or together (a separate registration is required). One is not a prerequisite for the other, so take whichever one you prefer first. The successful completion of each course qualifies the participant for a digital badge. Participants who choose to enroll in both badge programs do not need to repeat the introductory Theory and Practice class (see Schedule ).

DIGITAL BADGES 

Digital badges are online credentials that demonstrate one's achievement of a particular skill or set of skills. They may be displayed on online platforms, including LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook and any digital badge backpack, such as Mozilla Open Source. University Badges may also be listed on resumes and CVs.

Prerequisites: None–you don't have to know anything about coding to get started! You just need a laptop ( see tech specs) and have a desire to learn. 

FORMAT & SCHEDULE

Students attend classes over a weekend and spend the next three weeks completing a practicum online. There is one final on-campus class meeting, where students will present the prototypes they have developed.    View Schedule

 


 The Courses

 

Web Development for Teachers

Theory and Practice  (2 hours). This foundational class will offer a general overview of computer programming with an emphasis on how master teachers integrate computing projects across the curriculum.

Major topics:

  • the function and purpose of front vs back end web development
  • the differences between native and hybrid applications
  • best practices in programming
  • analysis of case studies in K-12 classroom computing 

Coding Basics   (6 hours).   This course will introduce the basics of front end web development in HTML5 (HTML, CSS, Javascript). Participants will code a personal website using a browser based program.

Coding Practicum  (7 hours) Participants will develop a proposal for a coding project they would like to initiate in the classroom. Participants will have the option to work in teams. Through instructor feedback, pair programming, and workshopping, students will bring their project to life. Participants will attend a launch party to share their lesson plan and prototype.

15 HOURS | $550* |   VIEW SCHEDULE & REGIsTRATION 

 

 

Mobile Apps Pedagogy

Theory and Practice  (2 hours). This foundational class will offer a general overview of computer programming with an emphasis on how master teachers integrate computing projects across the curriculum.

Major topics:

  • the function and purpose of front vs back end web development
  • the differences between native and hybrid applications
  • best practices in programming
  • analysis of case studies in K-12 classroom computing 

Mobile App Development Basics   (6 hours).   This course will introduce the basics of back end web app development using a browser based program. Participants will code and deploy a basic android application.

Mobile App Practicum   (7 hours).   Participants will develop a proposal for a Mobile App project they would like to initiate in the classroom. Participants will have the option to work in teams. Through instructor feedback, pair programming, and workshopping, students will bring their project to life. Participants will attend a launch party to share their lesson plan and prototype.

15 HOURS | $550* |   VIEW SCHEDULE & REGISTRATION 

 



The Instructors

Gina Sipley

Gina Sipley (Director of the Coding in the Schools Program) is a PhD student studying Digital Literacies at Hofstra University. She holds master's degrees from Syracuse University and the University of Oregon and is a proud first generation college graduate of SUNY Binghamton.

Currently a tenure track Instructor of Reading, Basic Education, and Women's Studies at SUNY Nassau Community College, she has a decade of experience teaching Middle and High School English and Social Studies. Her writing about educational technology can be found in Al Jazeera America, .Mic, EdSurge and a variety of peer-reviewed publications.

 

 

Saber Khan Saber Khan is a veteran educator with many years of math and science teaching experience. Over the past five years he has been teaching technology, especially robotics and Computer Science. He is passionate about learning how the Internet works and how people experience it. He is a graduate of Kenyon College with a master's in special education from San Francisco State University. Currently, he is a CS teacher at the Browning School and the Director of Educational Technology. 

 

 

 

JoAnne Thacker  JoAnne Thacker is a math and computer science instructor at Nassau Community College with a great interest in finding and sharing new ways to use technology in the classroom.  She has several years experience as a software developer in both private and government industries.  When not teaching, she's a busy mom and wife, and often found tinkering with a new Raspberry Pi or Android application.  

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