Undergraduate Courses

SOC 105-F Introduction to Sociology

A general introduction to the science of sociology. This course emphasizes sociological theory and methods. Students are taught what is unique about the way in which sociologists analyze human behavior and society. Differences between the sociological perspective and perspectives of other social sciences are emphasized. There is also a heavy emphasis on the types of methods and data that sociologists use to test the validity of their ideas. May not be taken for credit in addition to SOC 106.
3 credits

SOC 106-F Introduction to Sociology: Honors

An enriched introduction to the sociological perspective with an emphasis on how sociologists develop and test their hypotheses about human behavior. This course requires more reading and covers more complex topics than SOC 105, providing an introduction to sociology in greater depth. May not be taken for credit in addition to SOC 105.
Prerequisite: Priority given to Honors College and Honors Program students, Presidential Scholars, and Freshman Scholars
3 credits

SOC 200-F Medicine and Society

An examination of some traditional concerns of the humanities and social sciences as they occur in basic health care and its delivery. Practicing physicians or other health care professionals present clinical cases to emphasize such topics as allocation of scarce resources, issues of dying and refusing treatment, confidentiality, and cultural factors and disease. Discussion focuses on the social, historical, ethical, and humanistic import of the cases. Crosslisted with HMC 200.
3 credits

SOC 201 Research Methods in Sociology

Methods of collecting and analyzing empirical data to test sociological hypotheses. Emphasis is on multivariate analysis of tabular and statistical data. Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106.
3 credits

SOC 202-C Statistical Methods in Sociology

An introduction to the use and interpretation of statistical methods in social research; descriptive and inferential statistics. May not be taken for credit after AMS 102, ECO 320, POL 201, PSY 201, 203.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; satisfaction of entry skill in mathematics requirement
3 credits

SOC 204-F Intimate Relationships

The dynamics of forming, maintaining, and dissolving intimate relationships. Attention is focused on dating, partner selection, sexuality, marriage, divorce, and remarriage. Crosslisted with WST 204.
3 credits

SOC 243-F Sociology of Youth

Adolescent socialization; age structures and intergenerational conflict; peer groups and youth subcultures.
3 credits

SOC 247-K Sociology of Gender

The roles of women and men in American society; changing relations between the sexes; women's liberation and related movements. Crosslisted with WST 247.
Prerequisites: Completion of D.E.C. categories I and J strongly recommended
3 credits

SOC 264-J Introduction to Middle Eastern Society

A broad survey of society, politics, and culture in Islamic Middle East and North Africa. The course includes an examination of Middle Eastern social structure, culture, and religion. Social stratification and the relationship between the pastoral/nomadic, agrarian, and urban sectors of Middle Eastern societies are analyzed. The major patterns of social change, modernization of states, and political revolutions in the 20th century are also studied.
3 credits

SOC 268-F Theory and Practice in Student Leadership

Leadership theory, leadership qualities, and group dynamics are explored with an emphasis placed on experiential learning and group observation. Effective communication skills, understanding group dynamics, and appreciating cultural diversity are topics of significant relevance.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106
3 credits

SOC 302-K American Society

Intended for students who wish to look at American society through the eyes of the sociologist. Included in the course is the sociological view of American social structure in terms of power and patterns of inequality, the legal system, ethnic and cultural pluralism, social mobility, and urban problems.
Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; completion of D.E.C. categories I and J strongly recommended
3 credits

SOC 303-F Social Stratification

Theories of social stratification; patterns of differentiation in wealth, prestige, and power; social mobility; power structures and elites.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 304-F Sociology of the Family

A historical and cross-cultural analysis of the family as a major social institution in society; the demography of contemporary American families; selected policy issues involving the family. Crosslisted with WST 304.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 309-F Social Conflicts and Movements

An examination of aggregate phenomena, revolutionary and counterrevolutionary programs and organizations. Historical and cross-cultural examples are emphasized.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 310-K Ethnic Relations

The comparative experience of ethnic and other minority groups withing the United States, including formation, migration, and conflict; prejudice, discrimination, and minority self-hatred.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences; completion of D.E.C. categories I and J strongly recommended
3 credits

SOC 315-H Sociology of Technology

Social systems and the various "tools" they develop to shape their environment. Concentration on technologies of highly developed, modern societies and on ethical issues involved in attempts to guide the development and effects of these technologies. Consideration is given to the role of technology in all societies, from the simplest to the most developed.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences; one D.E.C. category E course
3 credits

SOC 320-F Population and Society

Sources and consequences of changes in population size and composition; the "demographic explosion."
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 323-K Urban Society

The emergence of cities and the process of urbanization; an examination of urban structure; the consequences of the urban milieu for interpersonal relations and institutions.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 336-F Social Change

Development and modernization are studied in a historical and comparative perspective that emphasizes the universality of social change in human societies. The approach is macrosociological, focusing on broad patterns of change in economic, social, and political organization in the modern era. Revolutions as dramatic instances of socio-political change receive particular attention.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 337-F Social Deviance

Competing theories of the nature of social deviance; stigmatizing, labeling, and application of informal social controls; technical, legal, and ethical issues related to "non-victim" crimes.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
credits

SOC 338-F The Sociology of Crime

The application of formal social control to criminally prosecutable offenses; the relationship of law and society; the criminal justice system.
Prerequisites: SOC 337
3 credits

SOC 339-F Sociology of Alcoholism and Drug Abuse

An examination of the sociological literature on alcoholism and drug abuse. Topics include addictive careers, the epidemiology (spread) of abuse, history of attempts to control alcohol and drugs, treatment approaches, and policy alternatives.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 341-F Historical Sociology

Sociological theories and methods applied to the study of historical phenomena such as revolutions, migration, and industrialization.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences; a history course is also recommended
3 credits

SOC 344-F Environmental Sociology

Analysis of how populations gain sustenance from their environments through organization, information, and technology. Evolution of technology and its ecological consequences for population growth, urbanization, social stratification, environmental destruction, and the quality of life. Problems in managing the human environment and communities.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 351-F Sociology of the Arts

Theories on the arts and society; the social role of the artist; processes of cultural production. Examples are drawn from one or more of the arts, including literature and the visual and performing arts.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 352-F Sociology of Religion

The ways in which sociocultural processes affect and are influenced by religious belief systems and organizations; changing structures and functions of religious institutions.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 355-H Social World of Humans and Animals

Comparison of basic social processes in human and animal groups. Topics covered include dominance, hierarchies, the distribution of scarce resources, cooperation,and the division of labor.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; one D.E.C. category E course in biology
3 credits

SOC 356-F Political Sociology

Social structure and processes as they affect, and are affected by, political behavior and organization; the sociology of power, authority, and legitimacy.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 361-F Historical Development of Sociological Theory

Main currents in the development of modern sociology, with an emphasis on Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, among other leading theorists.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 362-F Contemporary Sociological Theory

A systematic treatment of the dominant general orientations in sociology including structural-functional analysis, symbolic interactionism, and modern versions of Marxism.
Prerequisites: SOC 361
3 credits

SOC 364-J Sociology of Latin America

A survey of Latin American societies, social structures, and processes of social, political, and economic change. Topics include social stratification; occupational structure; demographic characteristics; the state; class structure; military intervention in politics; conditions for democracy, political stability, and revolution; policy making; and popular social movements.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 365-J Introduction to Afridan Society

Examination of the ways that the slave trade and colonization affected African societies’ incorporation into the world economy as well as the development of their social and political institutions. The nature of African institutions, organizations, belief and value systems before the colonial impact and how these histories were understood and experienced by African men and women are considered. The historical continuities and discontinuities in contemporary African societies as well as the effects of globalization and modernization in Africa are examined. This course is offered as both AFS 365 and SOC 365.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or AFS 101 or 102 or POL 101 or 103 in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 371-K Gender and Work

Gender differences in work force participation and occupational attainment, with an emphasis on the United States. Covers such topics as historical changes in work force participation; economic, legal, and social factors affecting employment; career options; and pay equity. Readings and lectures focus on the historical and contemporary experience of American men and women, including differences by ethnicity and class. Crosslisted with WST 371.
Prerequisites: WST/SSI 102, WST 103, SOC 105, or SOC 106; two other courses in the social sciences; completion of D.E.C. categories I and J strongly recommended
3 credits

SOC 373-F Collective Behavior

Major unstructured social phenomena--such as mob violence, panics, fads and fashions, and public opinion--as the outcome of collective problem-solving activity.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 378-F War and the Military Topics

The causes and origins of wars, and the impact of war on social change. Topics covered may include issues of military organization, recruitment, training, morale, war planning, and the integration of women, gays, and minorities in the military. Crosslisted with HIS 378.
Prerequisites: One History course or SOC 105 or 106
3 credits

SOC 380-F Social Psychology

Individual and social factors in human behavior; the structure of personality; identity development; communication processes; and attitudes.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106 or PSY 103; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 381-F Sociology of Organizations

Bureaucracy as a form of organization; the structure of relations between and within organizations.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 382-F Small Groups

The structure and functioning of face-to-face groups in field and laboratory settings.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 384-F Sociology of the Life Course

Change and stability of individuals through the life course (from childhood to old age) in the context of social structure and interactional processes. Covers such topics as socially structured periods and transitions in the life course; identity formation; continuity and change; life crises; changing roles and transitions.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 386-J State and Society in the Middle East

State building and modernization in the Middle East during the last century and a half are studied in the context of the Middle Eastern social structure and institutions. The analysis of political change--reform and revolution--in the Middle East is viewed form a socio-historical perspective.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 387-F Sociology of Education

Educational institutions as social systems; social patterns in the life cycles of students and teachers; class and ethnic factors in educational development.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
3 credits

SOC 390-F, 391-F, 392-F, 393-F, 394, 395-H, Special Topics

Lectures on topics of current sociological interest, which are announced before the start of the term. May be repeated as the topic varies.
Prerequisites: SOC 105 or 106; two other courses in the social sciences
Schedule to be announced, 3 credits each

SOC 447 Independent Readings

Selected readings, usually in a special area, to be arranged by the student and the instructor. May be repeated. A total of no more than six credits of SOC 287, 447, 487, and 488 may be counted toward the major. A maximum of three credits may be taken with any one faculty member in any one semester.
Prerequisites: Written permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies
1 to 6 credits

SOC 475 Undergraduate Teaching Practicum I

Work with a faculty member as an assistant in one of the faculty member's regularly scheduled classes. The student is required to attend all the classes, do all the regularly assigned work, and meet with the faculty member at regularly scheduled times to discuss the intellectual and pedagogical matters relating to the course. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only.
Prerequisites: Upper-division standing; 12 credits of sociology; permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies
3 credits

SOC 476 Undergraduate Teaching Practicum II
The continuation on a more advanced level of training in the techniques of organization and management in the teaching of sociology courses. Students assume greater responsibility in areas as leading discussions, analyzing results of tests that have already been graded, and observing teaching methods. The course in which a student is permitted to work as a teaching assistant is different from the course in which he or she previously served. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only.
Prerequisites: SOC 475; permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies
3 credits

SOC 487 Independent Research
Designing and carrying out a research project selected by the student and arranged by the student and the instructor. May be used for URECA projects associated with faculty research. May be repeated. A total of no more than six credits of SOC 287, 447, 487, and 488 may be counted toward the major.
Prerequisites: Written permission of instructor and director of undergraduate studies. For URECA projects, permission of URECA coordinator required instead of that of the director of undergraduate studies.
1 to 6 credits

SOC 488 Internship

Participation in local, state, and national public and private agencies and organizations. Students are required to submit written progress reports and a final written report on their experience to the faculty sponsor and the department. Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory grading only. May be repeated. A total of no more than six credits of SOC 287, 447, 487, and 488 may be counted toward the major.
Prerequisites: Twelve credits in sociology; permission of instructor, department, and Office of Undergraduate Studies
3 to 12 credits

SOC 495, 496 Senior Honors Project I, II

A two-semester project for candidates for the degree with honors in sociology, arranged in consultation with the director of undergraduate studies. The project involves independent readings or research and writing a paper under the close supervision of an appropriate faculty member on a suitable topic selected by the student.
Prerequisite to SOC 495: Admission to the sociology honors program
Prerequisite to SOC 496: SOC 495
3 credits each semester

News & Events

  June 2014
 
  •Suzan Walters was named a 2014 Teaching Innovations and Professional Development Award Recipient by SAGE.  
  May 2014  
  Cathy Marrone receives the Sister Margareet Ann Landry Lifetime Achievement Award at the Stony Brook Student Life Awards Ceremony  
  April 2014  
 

•Study by Arnout van de Rijt and Michael Restivo published in PNAS and featured in The Economist
•Kenneth Pierce has received the Jean Harvey Slappy Fellowship by the Marcus Garvey Foundation
•Florencia Arancibia has been awarded an Inter-American Foundation Grassroots Development Field Research Fellowship
IHSS, co-sponsored with the Department of History presents Samuel Roberts, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, April 22nd, 2:30 PM, SBS N320, "Black Politics, Caught Between Criminalization and Medicalization:  Methadone Maintenance, Decriminalization, and Harm Reduction, 1965-1990."
Natalia Sarkisian, Boston College, April 17th, 4:00 PM, SBS S403,"More or Less Kin:  Economic Disparities and Kin Support"
Oyeronke Oyewumi received the Distinguished Africanist Award by the New York African Studies Association (NYASA)
•Hyang-Gi Song has been awarded the Center for Korean Studies graduate fellowship
Jennifer London, Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University, April 9, 2014, 3:00 PM, Stony Brook Manhattan, "Understanding Authoritarianism as a Dynamic Category of Practice:  Ibn al-Muqaffa's Legacy for the History of Arab Political Thought:"

 
  March 2014  
 

•Brooke Ellison, Ph.D. 2012, Assistant Professor of Healthcare Policy and Management at Stony Brook University, was selected by the World Economic Forum as a 2014 Global Leader.
•Oyeronke Oyewumi awarded 2014/15 Fulbright Scholar Grant for teaching and research in Harare, Zimbabwe
•Rebekah Burroway, Cathy Marrone, and Carrie Shandra awarded Dean's Funds for Excellence awards
•Sasha Rodriguez awarded the American Sociological Association Minority Fellowship
•Bethany Coston receives the Madeline Fusco Fellowship Award
•Sasha Rodriguez receives the Faculty-Staff Dissertation Fellowship
•Amanda Kennedy receives the President's Award for Excellence in Teaching
•Sociology Major Neha Kinariwalla receives Gates Cambridge University Fellowship
•Ambassador Robert Toscano, March 24, 2014, 4:00 PM, Center for Italian Studies, Library, Room E4340, "Putin's Russia: Between Soviet Nostalgia and Traditionalist Nataionalism"
Valerie Leiter, Simmons College, March 13th, 4:00 PM, Health Sciences Center,Level 2, Room 408 (School of Health Technology and Management Conference Room),"Power, Rights, and Participation among Youth with Disabilities."  Co-sponsored by the Program in Public Health
IHSS will present Lori Flores, Stony Brook University, Department of History, March 5, 12:00 Noon, SBS N320, "Battlegrounds of Masculinity:  Latino Servicemen, Zoot Suiters, and Farmworkers in World War II"

 
  February 2014
 
  •Tarun Banerjee receives Sociology Department's Judith Tanur Dissertation Research Award.
Crystal Fleming receives Career Enhancement Fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.
IHSS will present Lawrence Frohman, Stony Brook University, Department of History, February 12th, 11:30 AM, SBS N320, "Surveillance, Security, Divinity"
 
   November 2013  
   Michael Schwartz named Distinguished Teaching Professor by the State University of New York Board of Trustees  
   October 2013  
  Professor Adam Possamai, University of West Sydney, to speak on "Contemporary Religion and Australian Aborigines", Wednesday, October 30th, 3:00 PM, Stony Brook Manhattan, sponsored by the Dept. of Sociology, SBU Institute for Global Studies, and International Academic Programs and Services
Memory in the Disciplines Workshop welcomes Professor Suparna Rajaram, Stony Brook University, "Collaborative Memory:  A Cognitive Perspective", Wednesday, October 30th, 2:30 PM, SBS N403
IHSS co Sponsored with the Department of History presents Patrick Weil, CNRS and Yale Law School, October 30th, 4:30 PM, SBS N320, "From Emma Goldman to Edward Snowden:  How Denationalization of "Radical" Americans Reshaped American Citizenship
IHSS presents Robert Chase, Stony Brook History Department, October 22nd, 2:30 PM,  SBS N320, "Slaves of the State Revolt:  The Prisoners' Rights Movement and the Construction of the Carceral State"
 
  September 2013  
  Arnout van de Rijt wins $275k NSF grant for in vivo experimental research on arbitrary social inequality
•Screening of the film, ESCAPE FIRE, Tuesday, September 17th, 4:00 PM, SBS N403
IHSS presents Clayton Fordahl, Stony Brook Sociology Department, September 24th, 2:30 PM,  SBS N405, Imperium in imperio:  Martyrdom, the Roman Empire, and the Creation of Christian Sovereignty" 
 

Department of Sociology,  Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-4356, tel.: +1 (631) 632-7700