Graduate Courses

Note to Prospective Students: The course catalogue does not offer descriptions of courses held under the category of "Graduate Seminar." These comprise many of the Sociology Departments courses.

 

SOC 501: Multivariate Statistics for Social Science

This course is an advanced treatment of descriptive and inferential statistics with emphasis on the latter. Students will gain practical experience in analyzing current data from the social sciences through the use of statistical computer programs. Topics include: sampling, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability theory, hypothesis testing, point and interval estimation, the normal, binomial, and chi-square distributions, parametric and non-parametric measures of association and correlation, and bi-variate regression.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 502: Multivariate Regression Techniques

This course provides an in-depth overview of regression analysis, primarily focused on OLS modeling. Topics include: inferences in regression analysis, dummy variables, interaction terms, and diagnostics and remedial measures. The course concludes with an introduction to other regression techniques such as logistic and probability modeling.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 504: Logic and Practice of Sociology

This course provides an introduction to the logic of empirical research in sociology. It takes a broad overview of both quantitative and qualitative methods; inductive and deductive reasoning; and the process of theory construction and testing,  with an emphasis on research design and the logic of causal analysis. A knowledge of advanced statistics is not assumed.  Topics covered include survey research, participant observation and field methods, the comparative method, experimental and  quasi-experimental design, content analysis, and the logic of multivariate analysis.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 505: Classical Sociological Theory

A review of the intellectual development of the discipline, its epistemological foundations, and classical theoretical statements.

Fall, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 506: Contemporary Sociological Theory

A review of the current major theoretical orientations and newly developing theoretical perspectives.

Spring, 3 credits, Letter  graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 509: The Practice of Ethnography

This course has four major objectives: (1) to become familiar with contemporary ethnogaphies; (2) to acquaint students with the methodological literature on qualitative sociology; (3) to consider theoretical and epistemological issues in qualitative research; and (4) to put some data production techniques (observant participation, in-depth interviews, and life stories) into practice.

This course is co-scheduled with WST 610. Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated 2 times FOR credit.

 

SOC 510: Historical Methods in Sociology

Major approaches, philosophical problems of, and methods used in historical sociology. Topics covered include causal analysis, macrosociological comparisons, case-oriented versus variable-oriented approaches, ideal types, comparative typologies, narrative, and issues of significance and objectivity. Special attention is given to the problem of concept formation.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

SOC 512: Global Sociology, Identities and Organizations in Global Perspective

This course examines how increasing global integration impacts human societies. It reviews the broad trends that foster globalization in the economic, political, cultural, and social spheres, as well as the consequences global change has had on how individuals and communities identify themselves and how they organize for collective goals. Core issues on the global agenda such as conflict, environment, technological and economic development, demographic change, gender, and human rights will be addressed; research methods for the study of global society will be introduced.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 514: Advanced Topics in Global Sociology

This course provides an advanced treatment of major topics and debates in the increasingly globalized social sciences. The course is based on research activities of the faculty and students. Topics may include global inequality; globalization and gender; sociology of human rights; war and revolution; transnational social movements; comparative political economy; globalization and immigration; globalization and work; issues in global culture.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated for credit.

 

SOC 516: Social Inequality

Causes, consequences, and explanations of a prevailing social, political, and economic phenomenon. The course assesses long-run trajectories of inequalities in their various forms and dimensions, and analytically and theoretically considers the topic at the local, national, and global levels.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated 2 times FOR credit.

 

SOC 518: Sociology of Gender

This course will familiarize students with the field through a broad survey. Topics include theoretical debates about construction of gender identity, conceptual and empirical issues in the study if gender dynamics and empirical studies of the way gender constituted by social institutions such as family, education, workplace, and media.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated 2 times FOR credit.

 

SOC 519: Advanced Topics in Gender Studies

This advanced course will continue the discussion of the graduate seminar on Sociology of Gender, by examining theoretical debates or controversies, examining specific gender identities, examining the gender of a specific institution (i.e., labor,law), or the gendered dynamics of social interaction (in for example, romantic relationships or sexuality).

Co-scheduled with WST 602. Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated 2 times FOR credit.

 

SOC 521: Social Psychology

An analysis of the three major domains of social psychology: (1) symbolic interactionism with a focus on the topic of identity; (2) psychological social psychology with a focus on the topics of personal perception and attitudes; and (3) social structure and personality with a focus on the topics of norms, roles and socialization.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated 2 times FOR credit.


SOC 523: Sociology of Education

Relationships between education and other institutions. Internal dynamics of the school and the classroom.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 531: Economic Sociology

This course reviews the fundamental principles of economic sociology and looks carefully at the main areas of research in the resurgence that began in the 1970's. The course covers classic texts and considers key areas that have animated the field in the recent era. Subjects would include the rise of the large corporation, ownership and control debate (including the overlapping issues of corporate interlocks and finance capital), the issue of markets and transactions costs, the development of the embeddedness perspective, labor markets and the nature and extent of globalization.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated 2 times FOR credit.

 

SOC 532: Organizations

This course will review classic and current research in the area of organizations. It will cover internal dynamics of organizations, beginning with classic Weberian theory, and continue by reviewing contemporary approaches to human relations theory. It will address key debates about the dynamics of management-worker relations, and it will scrutinize the debate of corporate control. Also it will survey the literature on interorganizational relations and dynamics, such as interlock research to new institutionalism.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated 2 times FOR credit.

 

SOC 542: Deviance

Survey of recent research literature on various kinds of deviance (crime, delinquency, and morally stigmatized behavior). Controversial issues in theory and research methods.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 545: Social Movements

Unorganized collectives and their role in change. Studies of specific social movements and other collective behavior episodes.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated 2 times FOR credit.

 

SOC 549: Social Change

The image of technological, generational, and cultural forces on social organization from historical and comparative perspectives.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 555: War and the Military

A comparative and historical study of the social organization of war and the military; causes, conduct, and consequences of war.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)


SOC 556: Political Sociology

The study of political institutions and of the politically relevant actions and attitudes of individuals and groups. Particular stress is placed on the reciprocal relationship between social movements and political institutions.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 561: Cultural Sociology

Cultural sociology is a multi-faceted approach used to analyze phenomena as varied as the arts and popular culture, social identities, social movements, markets, and politics. In this course the major theoretical approaches are presented along with the most significant empirical work done in recent years. Classical as well as contemporary texts are considered.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated 2 times FOR credit.

 

SOC 562: Sociology of the Arts

The relations between social structure, social change, and the development of major art forms.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 566: Funding and Grant Writing in Sociology

This course will provide students with the skills necessary to write grant proposals for both government and private agencies. The main requirement will be to prepare a proposal suitable for submission to a particular agency that funds the kind of research the student plans to do.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated 2 times FOR credit

 

SOC 568: Dissertation Seminar

Under the direction of the seminar leader, students help one another (1) prepare for the Preliminary Specialty Field Exam (which includes putting together a reading list) and (2) work on a dissertation proposal and its defense. The details of selecting a dissertation committee and writing a dissertation are also explored.

Fall or Spring, 3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated 2 times FOR credit.

 

SOC 590: Independent Study

Intensive reading, under supervision of one or more instructors, of material not covered in the formal curriculum.

1-12 credits, S/U grading May be repeated for credit.

 

SOC 591: Special Seminars

Topics to be arranged. The seminar is built around actual research activities of students and faculty. The following topics have been covered: Cultural Theory; Sociology of Technology; Micro-sociology; Advanced Topics in Marxist Theory; Sociology of Emotions; Historical Methods; Ethnic Relations; Biosociology; Comparative Stratification; Max Weber; Sociology of the Future; Science of Sociology and Everyday Life; The Study of the World's Advanced Societies; Methods of Behavioral Observation; Social Structure; Sociology of the Family; Cognitive Sociology; Sociology of Work; Transnational Social Movements; Economic Sociology; War and Revolution; Sociology of Gender; Sociology of Culture; Development of Capitalism; Film as a Sociological Research Tool; Funding and Grant Writing; The Three Faces of Social Psychology; A Structural Approach to Organizational Behavior; Professionals and Professionalism; Sociology of Modernity; Globalization and Immigration; Research Support in Sociology; Sociology of Sexual Behavior; Global Sociology; Gender and the Law; Poverty and Homelessness.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated for credit.

 

SOC 595: Special Seminars

Topics to be arranged. The seminar is built around actual research activities of students and faculty. The following topics have been covered: Cultural Theory; Sociology of Technology; Micro-sociology; Advanced Topics in Marxist Theory; Sociology of Emotions; Historical Methods; Ethnic Relations; Biosociology; Comparative Stratification; Max Weber; Sociology of the Future; Science of Sociology and Everyday Life; The Study of the World's Advanced Societies; Methods of Behavioral Observation; Social Structure; Sociology of the Family; Cognitive Sociology; Sociology of Work; Transnational Social Movements; Economic Sociology; War and Revolution; Sociology of Gender; Sociology of Culture; Development of Capitalism; Film as a Sociological Research Tool; Funding and Grant Writing; The Three Faces of Social Psychology; A Structural Approach to Organizational Behavior; Professionals and Professionalism; Sociology of Modernity; Globalization and Immigration; Sexual Behavior; Global Sociology; Gender and the Law; Poverty and Homelessness.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated for credit.

 

SOC 598: Research

Execution of a research project under the supervision of one or more faculty members.

1-12 credits, S/U grading May be repeated for credit.

 

SOC 603: Advanced Topics in Quantitative Analysis

Mathematical and statistical methods in the analysis of quantitative data.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.) May be repeated for credit.

 

SOC 604: Advanced Topics in Qualitative Analysis

The use of personal documents, official records, field observations, and interviews.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 691: Practicum for Teaching and Graduate Assistants

Individualized supervision of initial (first two semesters) teaching assistance. Discussion, examination construction, student consultation, and grading. Register for section of supervising instructor.

3 credits, S/U grading

 

SOC 692: Practicum in the Teaching of Sociology

The exploration of teaching goals, processes, and outcomes. Practice lectures are videotaped and discussed; classroom visits; planning, outlining, selection of course material; writing of syllabus for Introductory Sociology section to be taught as part of SOC 693 in following semester.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 693: Practicum for Graduate Teaching Interns

Supervised teaching of a section of Sociology 105 using the outlines, materials, and techniques developed in SOC 692. Includes weekly meetings of all persons registered for SOC 693 and observation of classes by both faculty and fellow graduate students.

3 credits, Letter graded (A, A-, B+, etc.)

 

SOC 699: Dissertation Research on Campus

Dissertation research under direction of advisor.

Prerequisite: Advancement to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research must take place on SBU campus, at Cold Spring Harbor, or at the Brookhaven National Lab. Summer, 1-9 credits, S/U grading May be repeated for credit.

 

SOC 700: Dissertation Research off Campus - Domestic

Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place off-campus, but in the United States and/ or U.S. provinces. Please note, Brookhaven National Labs and the Cold Spring Harbor Lab are considered on-campus. All international students must enroll in one of the graduate student insurance plans and should be advised by an International Advisor.

Fall, Spring, 1-9 credits, S/U grading May be repeated for credit.

 

SOC 701: Dissertation Research off Campus - International

Prerequisite: Must be advanced to candidacy (G5). Major portion of research will take place outside of the United States and/or U.S. provinces. Domestic students have the option of the health plan and may also enroll in MEDEX. International students who are in their home country are not covered by mandatory health plan and must contact the Insurance Office for the insurance charge to be removed. International students who are not in their home country are charged for the mandatory health insurance. If they are to be covered by another insurance plan they must file a waiver by second week of classes. The charge will only be removed if other plan is deemed comparable.

All international students must receive clearance from an International Advisor. Spring, 1-9 credits, S/U grading May be repeated for credit.

 

SOC 800: SUMMER RESEARCH

May be repeated for credit.

News & Events

  October 2014
 
  IHSS will present Rick DesRochers, Long Island University-Post Campus, Department of Theatre, October 14, 2:30 PM, SBS N403, "The Family Act Goes to School - The Marx Brothers, Vaudeville, and Americanization."  
  September 2014  
 

Michael Kimmel and Gloria Steinem co-author New York Times opinion piece on consensual sex on college campuses entitled "Yes Is Better Than No."
Kristen Shorette receives ASA Fund for the Advancement of the Discipline Award for her project, "Freedom from Discrimination as Human Right?  The Global Human Rights Regime and the Diffusion of Affirmative Action since 1965"
Carrie Shandra selected as a Fellow of the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research's Switzer Research Program
Nicholas Wilson, Yale University, September 29, 2014, 1:00 PM, SBS N403, "Corruption and the Making of Modern Bureaucracy:  Evidence from the British Empire in India."
IHSS will present Steven Skiena, Stony Brook University, Department of Computer Science, September 18, 2:30 PM, SBS N403, "Who's Bigger?  Where Historical Figures Really Rank.
 
  June 2014
 
  •Suzan Walters was named a 2014 Teaching Innovations and Professional Development Award Recipient by SAGE.  
  May 2014  
  Cathy Marrone receives the Sister Margareet Ann Landry Lifetime Achievement Award at the Stony Brook Student Life Awards Ceremony  
  April 2014  
 

•Study by Arnout van de Rijt and Michael Restivo published in PNAS and featured in The Economist
•Kenneth Pierce has received the Jean Harvey Slappy Fellowship by the Marcus Garvey Foundation
•Florencia Arancibia has been awarded an Inter-American Foundation Grassroots Development Field Research Fellowship
IHSS, co-sponsored with the Department of History presents Samuel Roberts, Columbia University Mailman School of Public Health, April 22nd, 2:30 PM, SBS N320, "Black Politics, Caught Between Criminalization and Medicalization:  Methadone Maintenance, Decriminalization, and Harm Reduction, 1965-1990."
Natalia Sarkisian, Boston College, April 17th, 4:00 PM, SBS S403,"More or Less Kin:  Economic Disparities and Kin Support"
Oyeronke Oyewumi received the Distinguished Africanist Award by the New York African Studies Association (NYASA)
•Hyang-Gi Song has been awarded the Center for Korean Studies graduate fellowship
Jennifer London, Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University, April 9, 2014, 3:00 PM, Stony Brook Manhattan, "Understanding Authoritarianism as a Dynamic Category of Practice:  Ibn al-Muqaffa's Legacy for the History of Arab Political Thought:"

 
  March 2014  
 

•Brooke Ellison, Ph.D. 2012, Assistant Professor of Healthcare Policy and Management at Stony Brook University, was selected by the World Economic Forum as a 2014 Global Leader.
•Oyeronke Oyewumi awarded 2014/15 Fulbright Scholar Grant for teaching and research in Harare, Zimbabwe
•Rebekah Burroway, Cathy Marrone, and Carrie Shandra awarded Dean's Funds for Excellence awards
•Sasha Rodriguez awarded the American Sociological Association Minority Fellowship
•Bethany Coston receives the Madeline Fusco Fellowship Award
•Sasha Rodriguez receives the Faculty-Staff Dissertation Fellowship
•Amanda Kennedy receives the President's Award for Excellence in Teaching
•Sociology Major Neha Kinariwalla receives Gates Cambridge University Fellowship
•Ambassador Robert Toscano, March 24, 2014, 4:00 PM, Center for Italian Studies, Library, Room E4340, "Putin's Russia: Between Soviet Nostalgia and Traditionalist Nataionalism"
Valerie Leiter, Simmons College, March 13th, 4:00 PM, Health Sciences Center,Level 2, Room 408 (School of Health Technology and Management Conference Room),"Power, Rights, and Participation among Youth with Disabilities."  Co-sponsored by the Program in Public Health
IHSS will present Lori Flores, Stony Brook University, Department of History, March 5, 12:00 Noon, SBS N320, "Battlegrounds of Masculinity:  Latino Servicemen, Zoot Suiters, and Farmworkers in World War II"

 
  February 2014
 
  •Tarun Banerjee receives Sociology Department's Judith Tanur Dissertation Research Award.
Crystal Fleming receives Career Enhancement Fellowship from the Woodrow Wilson Foundation.
IHSS will present Lawrence Frohman, Stony Brook University, Department of History, February 12th, 11:30 AM, SBS N320, "Surveillance, Security, Divinity"
 
   November 2013  
   Michael Schwartz named Distinguished Teaching Professor by the State University of New York Board of Trustees  
   October 2013  
  Professor Adam Possamai, University of West Sydney, to speak on "Contemporary Religion and Australian Aborigines", Wednesday, October 30th, 3:00 PM, Stony Brook Manhattan, sponsored by the Dept. of Sociology, SBU Institute for Global Studies, and International Academic Programs and Services
Memory in the Disciplines Workshop welcomes Professor Suparna Rajaram, Stony Brook University, "Collaborative Memory:  A Cognitive Perspective", Wednesday, October 30th, 2:30 PM, SBS N403
IHSS co Sponsored with the Department of History presents Patrick Weil, CNRS and Yale Law School, October 30th, 4:30 PM, SBS N320, "From Emma Goldman to Edward Snowden:  How Denationalization of "Radical" Americans Reshaped American Citizenship
IHSS presents Robert Chase, Stony Brook History Department, October 22nd, 2:30 PM,  SBS N320, "Slaves of the State Revolt:  The Prisoners' Rights Movement and the Construction of the Carceral State"
 
  September 2013  
  Arnout van de Rijt wins $275k NSF grant for in vivo experimental research on arbitrary social inequality
•Screening of the film, ESCAPE FIRE, Tuesday, September 17th, 4:00 PM, SBS N403
IHSS presents Clayton Fordahl, Stony Brook Sociology Department, September 24th, 2:30 PM,  SBS N405, Imperium in imperio:  Martyrdom, the Roman Empire, and the Creation of Christian Sovereignty" 
 

Department of Sociology,  Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-4356, tel.: +1 (631) 632-7700

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