Backing up Your Data

ARE YOU FULLY PROTECTED FROM DATA LOSS?

Many people do not realize that there is LOCAL data and REMOTE data that either reside on your computer, or on some other server that we are attached to on the network.

Productivity applications like Microsoft Word and Excel allow the user to automatically configure the SAVE destination. It usually DEFAULTS to “My Documents” on the LOCAL computer, but can be set up to default to a network share folder(REMOTE). (Ex: Y:\Admin01\Provost\*specified folder*)
In Word you can go to <TOOLS><OPTIONS><FILE LOCATIONS><MODIFY> and set one of the network drives as a saving location.
REMOTE DATA is safe because of redundancy features built in to the server that prevents data loss of any kind.

The Lotus Notes email client RESIDES ON A REMOTE SERVER, and consequently your inbox does not need to be saved, however, you MUST back up the ID file for the program to be functional in another configuration. There are other files that need to be backed up to save personal addresses and journals, etc.

ARCHIVED DATA

REMEMBER, WHEN YOU ARCHIVE YOUR NOTES DATA, IT IS ON THE LOCAL MACHINE, AND IS SUBJECT TO LOSS IF THE MACHINE BREAKS DOWN, OR IF THE DATA IS INADVERTANTLY ERASED.

Because of the size of archived databases, the Windows System Administrators prefer us not to save Lotus Notes backup archives to the network. Instead the options are:

1) Configure computer with DVD-R or CDROM – RW hardware so that you can create CD/DVD backups.

2) Use a physical storage device that is independent of the system, so that if the system fails, your data is on another device. You can order USB jump drives from Dell when they configure the system, but they generally only go up to a gigabyte of space (1000 MB’s - There would not be enough backup space for many users.) The other option is an EXTERNAL USB HARD DRIVE that comes in many sizes. They can be swapped to another machine very easily. An 80 GB Western Digital Passport drive goes for about 175.00, but like everything else they eventually come down in price.

The main advantage of the first two suggestions is that the data can be put in a safe place or taken “off site” to protect from fire or catastrophe.

3) A third “easier” option is to order a machine with a secondary hard drive(non-OS boot drive) that you can back up to. This way you would have identical data on two internal hardware devices, which would greatly minimize the risk of data loss. If Windows crashes, it would only affect the boot drive.

We have special software that would automatically schedule the backup of selected folders.


Please contact me about the options that are available and that can be tailored to the individual need you may have: Roland Diehl