Courses and Programs

Class Lecture 2 at Javits Center

 

ACADEMIC PROGRAMS

ACADEMIC PROGRAMSStudents can do a Major in Asian Studies with concentration on South Asia (36 credits), a Minor in South Asian Studies (21 credits), The programs are housed in the Department of Asian and Asian American Studies. The Center offers a Study Abroad program in India (12 credits) through the Office of International Academic Programs.

See links below for more information on the Major and Minor Programs:

Major: http://sb.cc.stonybrook.edu/bulletin/current/academicprograms/aas/

Minor: http://sb.cc.stonybrook.edu/bulletin/current/academicprograms/soa/ 

 SPRING 2013 NEW / TOPIC COURSE

South Asian Literature in English Literary Voices from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh

South Asian Literature in English 2013 Color Flyer

Dr. Rita Nezami will be teaching this course in 2013. The course counts toward the Major and Minor in Asian & Asian American Studies, as well as the Minor in South Asian Studies.

Krishna in Indian Art, Culture & Thought (AAS 212.02, DEC G, with Professor S.N. Sridhar)

Kirshna Course Flyer

 

Asian American Film and Media (AAS 212.01, DEC G, with Professor Nerissa Balce)

Asian American Contemporary Performance (AAS 391.01, DEC G, with Professor Sunita Mukhi)

Course List for Spring 2013

Center for India Studies Spring Courses 2013

 

Press here to access full course list:

 

Class Lecture

INDIA STUDIES COURSES OFFERED AT STONY BROOK

[The following is a list of courses taught and their descriptions.  Note that all are not offered every semester.]

AAS 110- G: Appreciating Indian Music

An introduction to the basic elements of Indian classical music, such as "raga" and "tala", "gharanas" (schools) and styles. Vocal and instrumental masterpieces are studied. Topics include: the roles of stringed and percussion instruments; the intimate relationship between music and religion, and music and ethnicity; and the influence of Indian classical music on contemporary art forms such as films and folk music. No previous musical training is required. 3 credits

AAS 201- J: Introduction to the Civilization of the Indian Subcontinent

Key concepts in South Asian civilization in art, architecture, religion, philosophy, science, society, literature, and politics from the Indus Valley to the present. Topics include evolution of Hinduism, Buddhism, yoga, classical and modern languages, the caste system and reform movements, Asohka, Akbar and great emperors, impact of Islam and Western colonization, and Gandhi and the impact of South Asia on the world.

AAS 209- D: Indian Classical Dance: Bharatanatyam

Introduction to the basics of Bharatanatyam (South Indian classical dance) technique. Includes primary postures and basic steps, or adavus. Class also covers the theory of Bharatanatyam including hand gestures, head, neck and eye movements, as delineated in Nandikeswara's Abhinaya Darpana. Students will gain a well-rounded knowledge of the dance by studying Bharatanatyam's form, content, basic history, music, and repertoire. By the end of the class, students will learn and present short dance pieces including a Jathi (string for adavus) and a Shlokam (poem). Advisory Prerequisite: Any dance class

3 credits

AAS 215- D: Classical Performing Arts of India

An introduction to the stories, histories, and aesthetics of Indian classical performing arts. The course focuses on Bharatanatyam, the solo dance form from South India. Kathakali, Manipuri, Odissi, and Kathak will be introduced to compare and contrast dance-theatre forms of South Asia. Students will be introduced to each performance form by studying its ancient and modern history, practitioners, technique, stage presentation, and aesthetics. The course explores the commonalities of all these performing art forms including: mythology, the classic text: Natya Shastra, abhinaya (mime) and the theory of rasa. Lessons will be accompanied by suitable reading material and visual demonstrations either on video or by a practitioner of the art form. Prerequisite: Completion of D.E.C. A

3 credits

AAS 250- K: Languages and Cultures of Asian Americans

Study of language use and cultural accommodation in selected Asian American communities in relation to the changing roles of Asians in U.S. society from the early democracy to the present. Issues include linguistic and cultural diversity of Asia and Asian Americans; comparison of Asian and European immigration patterns; struggle for equality and acceptance; cultural factors in assimilation; patterns of Asian language use and maintenance in various domains; the role of language in ethnic identity; attitudes toward English and bilingualism; bilingualism as a problem and as a resource. This course is offered as both AAS 250 and LIN 250.

3 credits

AAS 256- J: Hinduism

Survey of the principal religious and philosophical currents of Hindu civilization in India from the time of the Vedas and

Upanishads through the development of the major devotional ways and schools of thought current in India today. These include the olytheism of Hindu mythology, the theism of various forms of devotional practice, and the monotheism and nondualism of Hindu philosophy. This course is offered as both AAS 256 and RLS 256.

3 credits

AAS 260- J: Buddhism

An introduction to the basic philosophy and doctrines of Buddhism, beginning with a survey of lives and works of major historical

figures of Buddhism. The principal issues of Buddhist thought, drawing from Indian, East Asian, and Western sources, are treated. Particular attention is paid to the meaning of faith, practice, and enlightenment in Buddhism. This course is offered as both AAS 260 and RLS 260.

3 credit

AAS 280- J: Islam

An introduction to the main features of Islamic revelation as contained in the Koran and its impact on the major spiritual, intellectual, legal, and social teachings and institutions of the Islamic world. The course concludes with an examination of Islam in the modern world. This course is offered as both AAS 280 and RLS 280.

3 credits

AAS 320- G: Literature of India

Introduction to selected classics of Indian literature in English translation. Classical and modern works are discussed, representing Sanskrit (the Vedas, the Upanishads, the epics Ramayana and Mahabharata, classical drama of Kalidasa and Bhasa), Tamil, Kannada, Hindi-Urdu, and Indian English. Western and Indian literary theories and critical approaches are compared and evaluated. Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing Advisory Prerequisite: AAS 201 (or the former SAS 240)

3 credits

AAS 326- G: Indian Mythology

Study of the major themes in Indian mythology and their evolution, including the relation of these myths to philisophy and religions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism. Myths are traced from the Vedas of 1500 B.C. to the modern Indian myths. The course will consider the impact of myths on classical Indian literature and art forms, as well as their impact on contemporary art forms such as film, television, and theatre. Prerequisite: AAS 201 or 212

3 credits

AAS 327- G: Great Epics of India: Ramayana and Mahabharata

The themes, characters, and plots of Ramayana and Mahabharata are analyzed in detail. The moral dilemmas presented and their sometimes controversial solutions are explored in the context of "dharma", or righteousness-the central concept of Hiduism. The course will compare the two epics with each other. Prerequisite: AAS 201 or 212

3 credits

AAS 330- J: Language and Society in South Asia

Study of the evolution, stucture, and role of representative languages in South Asia. Focus is on multilingualism, lingua francas, national language, contact, convergence, and use, especially in education, administration, business, religion, literature, and the media. Topics may also include language, ethnic identity, and conflict; English in India; globalization and localization; and India's impact on linguistics. Advisory Prerequisite: LIN 101

3 credits

AAS 333- G: Indian Cinemas and Cultures

The course examines the contemporary global art form known as 'Indian cinemas' from its advent of the moving picture in the late 1800's to the present. In this Asian film course, we explore the various cinemas of India and the Indian diaspora such as Bollywood cinema, art cinema, films by Indian directors inside and outside India, music videos, and documentaries. Factors behind its ascent to the most popular art form as well as a lucrative medium of entertainment and potent vehicle for social change not only in India but also beyond its shores are examined in some depth. We discover how these various Indian cinemas address and depict the social mores, cultural practices and political issues of the South Asian subcontinent. Themes for our discussions include but are not limited to nationalism, sexuality, censorship, activism, tradition, modernity, identity, gender roles, and the pleasures and politics of song, dance and music, as we look at historical, thematic and aesthetic issues of these cinemas and their impact and influence in India as well as globally.

3 credits

AAS 338- J: Contemporary India: History, Politics, and Diplomacy

Study of the forces shaping India's postindependence history, domestic politics, and foreign diplomacy. As the world's largest democracy, second most populous nation, and Asia's second fastest growing economy, its impact on the international scene in the coming years will be carefully analyzed. The course, taught by a former Ambassador, will also focus on emerging trends in Indo-U.S. relations and impact of the Indian diaspora.

This course is offered as both AAS 338 and POL 338. Prerequisites: AAS 201 or POL 101; U3 or U4 standing

3 credits

AAS 347- J: South Asia Before Colonialism

The South Asia region (contemporary India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, Nepal and Afghanistan) has been a crossroads of diverse people, ideas and commodities for millennia. This course covers key themes and developments in the subcontinent from antiquity to the rise of British colonialism.  We will begin by covering major issues in early South Asia, and proceed to consider closely the medieval and early modern periods. Central themes include pre-modern dimensions of the Hindu-Muslim encounter, emergence of South Asian regions, the subcontinent in global networks, and early presence of European powers. This course is offered as both AAS 347 and HIS 347.

3 credits

AAS 357- J: India's Foreign Policy

A critical anaylsis of the foreign policy of  India since Independence in 1947, especially Non-alignment and relations with major powers. The factors behind India's entry into the nuclear club and its impact on her nternational relations within the subcontinent and beyond. Analysis of issues such as Kashmir, terrorism, India's quest for a permanent seat in the U.N. Security Council, economic reforms, and role of Indian diaspora to the country's relations with the countries of their adoption.

Prerequisite: U3 or U4 standing or permission of instructor Advisory Prerequisites: AAS 201 and 348

3 credits

AAS 368- J: Yoga: Theory and Praxis

In this course we investigate Yogic systems of philosophy and self-transformation in their many forms throughout history. Topics include the origins of Yoga in ancient India, the philosophy of the Yoga Sutras and its commentarial traditions, Buddhist Yoga, Hatha Yoga, Tantric Yoga, and the medicalization and globalization of Yoga in the modern period. Students are encouraged to supplement class discussions by participating in Yoga classes at the Stony Brook University Wellness Center. This course is offered as both AAS 368 and RLS 368. Prerequisite: One previous course in AAS or RLS Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or Senior standing

3 credits

AAS/PHI 386/01: Buddhism and Early Vedanta Philosophy

In India between the 1st and 8th centuries CE, Hindu and Buddhist philosophers debated one another on some of the most fundamental questions of human existence: Who are we? Is there an eternal "soul" or "self," or is all of life impermanent and fleeting? What should we do with our lives? Is the world real or just an illusion? The answers they gave frequently disagreed. Yet some recent studies have argued that there is a deep connection between Buddhist philosophy and the philosophy of Vedanta, the most famous of all the Hindu philosophical schools. Through careful reading of some of these Buddhist and Vedanta philosophers we will seek to understand the complex historical interrelationships between the two schools, and also learn to appreciate how their insights can help us find meaning in our lives today.  Prerequisite: One previous class in Asian Studies, Religious Studies, or Philosophy

HIN 111: Elementary Hindi I

An introduction to spoken and written Hindi, stressing pronunciation, speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing. This course is designed for students who have no prior knowledge of the language. A student who has had two or more years of Hindi in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take HIN 111 without written permission from the supervisor of the course.

3 credits

HIN 112 - S3: Elementary Hindi II

An introduction to spoken and written Hindi, stressing pronunciation, speaking, comprehension, reading, and writing.  Prerequisite: HIN 111

3 credits

HIN 211 - S3: Intermediate Hindi I

Advanced speaking, comprehension, reading, writing, and grammar. Selected texts are read. Practice in the language laboratory supplements class work. A student who has had more than four years of Hindi in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take HIN 211 without the written permission of the supervisor of the course. Prerequisite: HIN 112

3 credits

HIN 212 - S3: Intermediate Hindi II

Advanced speaking, comprehension, reading, writing, and grammar. Selected texts are read. Practice in the language laboratory supplements class work. A student who has had more than four years of Hindi in high school (or who has otherwise acquired an equivalent proficiency) may not take HIN 212 without the written permission of the supervisor of the course.  Prerequisite: HIN 211

3 credits

HIN 311 - S3: Hindi Conversation and Composition I

An advanced course designed to strengthen students' ability to understand, speak, read, and write Hindi beyond the intermediate level. Students learn to read and comprehend a variety of selected texts from their textbook which includes samples from Hindi newspapers, TV, films, journals, and classical and modern literature and to appreciate the cultural nuances of language use. They are also trained to write professionally and/or creatively in Hindi. Not intended for international students with native knowledge of written and spoken Hindi, or for native students who have mastered written and spoken Hindi. Prerequisite: HIN 212 or placement test.

3 credits

HIN 312 - S3: Hindi Conversation and Composition II

Students continue to strengthen their ability to understand, speak, read, and write Hindi beyond the intermediate level. Students learn to read and comprehend a variety of selected texts from their textbook which includes samples from Hindi newspapers, TV, films, journals, and classical and modern literature and to appreciate the cultural nuances of language use. Students are also trained to write professionally and/or creatively in Hindi. Not intended for international students with native knowledge of written and spoken Hindi, or for native students who have mastered written and spoken Hindi.  Prerequisite: HIN 311 or placement test

3 credits

SKT 111: Elementary Sanskrit I

An introduction to Sanskrit, the classical language of Indian religion and philosophy, including grammar, translation, and readings from selected texts of Hinduism and Buddhism.

4 credits

SKT 112 - S3: Elementary Sanskrit II

An introduction to Sanskrit, the classical language of Indian religion and philosophy, including grammar, translation, and readings from selected texts of Hinduism and Buddhism.

Prerequisite: SKT 111

4 credits

AAS 211 ​- F: Asian and Asian American Studies Topics in the Social Sciences

Using the methodologies of the social sciences disciplines of history, political science, sociology, and economics, this course provides an introductory overview of important topics in Asian and Asian American studies. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

3 credits

AAS 212 ​- G: Asian and Asian American Studies Topics in the Humanities

Using methodologies of the Humanities disciplines, such as literature, linguistics, classics, cultural studies, philosophy, religious studies, art history and criticism, this course provides an introductory overview of important topics in Asian and Asian American Studies. Topics may range from Women in Japanese fiction to Mahatma Gandhi's impact on politics and ethics. Semester supplements to this Bulletin contain specific description of topic and when course is offered. May be repeated as the topic changes.

3 credits

AAS 391- G: Humanities Topics in Asian and Asian American Studies

Past topics have included titles such as Sikhism; Introduction to Indian Philosophy; Modern Indian Literature; and Appreciating Indian Music. Designed for upper-division students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within humanities disciplines such as music, art, literature, religion, and philosophy. Students will be expected to demonstrate knowledge of the conventions and methods used in the humanities discipline(s) studied. May be repeated as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing..

AAS 392- F: Social Science Topics in Asian and Asian American Studies

Topics may include titles such as Indian Grammatical Tradition, English in Asia, and Indian Economics. Designed for upperdivision students, this course provides an in-depth study of a specific topic within social sciences disciplines such as history, economics, political science, and linguistics. Students will be expected to demonstrate an understanding of the methods social scientists use to explore social phenomena, and knowledge of the major concepts, models, and issues of the social science discipline(s) studied. May be repeated as the topic changes. Prerequisite: Junior or Senior Standing

3 credits

AAS 391.03 Mystics in Medieval India

The medieval period inIndiawas a time when Hindu and Islamic religious traditions flourished inIndia. In this course, we will examine three strands within these traditions. The first, hatha yoga, began in approximately the 9th century and is the forerunner of the types of physical yoga exercises practiced today throughout the world. The second is the Hindu tradition of devotion (bhakti), whose rise during the medieval period inIndialed to the dominance of this type worship of Visnu, Siva, and the Goddess among Hindus today. The third strand, Sufism, is often described as the mystical path of Islam. Although its origins were in the middle east andPersia, Sufism thrived inIndiabetween the 13th and 16   centuries. In this course we will pay special attention to the way in which these three stands intersected and influenced one another during the late medieval period, creating syncretic forms of practice and belief unique to the Indian subcontinent.

AAS 391.04, DEC G: Indian Buddhist Philosophies

In this course we will look at Buddhism philosophically. The fundamental teachings of Buddhism, the fourfold noble truth, the eightfold noble path and the practice of mindfulness, flow from a philosophical analysis of reality and the self. We will begin with a philosophical examination of the Buddha's core teachings of suffering and its causes, no-self, impermanence, and the 8-fold path of ethical action, knowledge and meditation that overcomes suffering. We will look at the underlying philosophical analyses, focusing on the arguments given for their interpretations by the earliest Buddhists. We will then study the writings of some of the great Indian Buddhist philosophers, Nagarjuna, Asanga, Vasubandhu, Candrakirti, and Dinnaga, critically examining their interpretations of key teachings and their analyses and arguments in support of their interpretations. We will also look at some of the important Indian commentaries on key texts such as the Heart Sutra.

AAS 391, DEC G: Women Saints of India

The Bhakti or devotional movement of South Asia is one of the great literary and religious movements of the world. Women play a crucial part in this movement. This course introduces students to the great women poets of medieval North and South India, such as, Mirabai (Rajasthan), Lal Ded (Kashmir), Akka Mahadevi (Karnataka), and Andaal (Tamil Nadu) from the Hindu tradition, as well as selected women poets from the Buddhist, Jain, Sikh and Islamic traditions. This poetry, though religious in themes, is universal in appeal. The poets speak of the pleasures and wonders, trials and tribulations in the daily lives of ordinary women in a patriarchal society; of friendship, betrayal, beauty, birth, and death; and the pains of separation, longing for union, sublimation and exaltations of love, sacred and profane. These women saints are hailed as the first feminists, and credited with bringing about a protestant, subaltern movement in religion as well as in literature, by composing in their respective regional languages (rather than Sanskrit), in homely vernacular styles defying the artifices of literary convention, and breaking the barrier between the sacred and the mundane. Their poetry gave voices to the ignored, the suppressed, and the marginalized sections of South Asian society.  We will read selections from their works, supplemented by critical studies and illustrations of their work in performance from media such as music, dance, and film.

AAS 392.02 Desi: Cultures and Communities of South Asians in the Diaspora Through Films, Performances, Media and Stories.

This course is a multidimensional look at one of the most vibrant, colorful, and Influential “new” immigrant communities inAmericaand around the world. Through films, performances, and stories written by South Asian authors, family histories, and personal tales, this course explores the issues of home and belonging, the portability and mutability of cultural capital, the challenges of cultural adaptation, intergenerational loyalties and conflicts, community empowerment and the inter connectedness of culture and the self. Desis are South Asians, people who trace their ancestry to India,Pakistan,Bangladesh,Sri LankaandNepaland other countries of the Indian subcontinent. Their culture will be the focus of this innovative course. We will study: who they are, where they come from where they have migrated Their families, languages, beliefs, values, and customs.

 


 

 

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SPOT LIGHT

Spring 2013
Lecture Series
Lecture by Dr. Aparna Pande
Explaining Pakistan’s Foreign Policy: Escaping India
Research Fellow, Hudson Institute
Charles B. Wang Center, Lecture Hall 1
Wednesday, March 27, 2013, 4 p.m.

Lecture is free and open to the public

 

 

Alumni Student News:
Congratulations!
Mohit Verma Wins Worldwide Investing Contest

 

 Learn Indian Languages in India:

AIIS Summer 2013 and Academic Year 2013-2014

 Language Programs

 

 Executive Committee Member,  Dr. Krishna R.S. Gujavarty, gifts $100,000 to establish the
“Dr. Gujavarty Family Seminar Fund in India Studies"

 

A Look Ahead - Spring 2013 Courses:
 
Krishna in Indian Art, Culture and Thought
 
South Asian Literature in English:
Literary Voices from India, Pakistan and Bangladesh
 
Fall 2012
 
Lecture Series
 
Lecture by Dr. Sukrita Paul Kumar
Delhi University
Conserving India’s Cultural Diversity:
Vibrant Tradition vs. Forces of Homogenization
Wednesday, October 10, 2012, 4 p.m.
1006 Humanities Building, Stony Brook University
The Lecture is free and open to the public.
 


 
Queens College, Year of India Event
Roundtable: Society and Politics
Wednesday,  October 3rd, 2012
12:15 pm to 1:30 pm, Campbell Dome, Queens College
For more information visit:
http://www.qc.cuny.edu/Academics/GlobalEd/YearOfIndia/Pages/default.aspx
 


 
An Interactive Conversation on Kannada Culture
Don't miss this unique opportunity to meet with leading lights in Kannada literature, theatre, television, and the press.
Saturday, September 8th, 2012
3-6pm
Admission Free, Donations Requested

Lecture Hall 201, Charles B. Wang Center, Stony Brook University


 

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Home   |  Center for India Studies, Melville Library, E5350, Stony Brook, NY 11794  |  Phone: (631) 632-9742  |  email:  indiastudies@stonybrook.edu