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RECENT FACULTY BOOKS

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Publisher's description: "Known as 'The Salad Bowl of the World,' California's Salinas Valley became an agricultural empire due to the toil of diverse farmworkers, including Latinos. A sweeping critical history of how Mexican Americans and Mexican immigrants organized for their rights in the decades leading up to the seminal strikes led by Cesar Chavez, this important work also looks closely at how different groups of Mexicans—U.S. born, bracero, and undocumented—confronted and interacted with one another during this period." (Yale University Press, 2016)

Tomes book

Publisher's description: "In a work that spans the twentieth century, Nancy Tomes questions the popular—and largely unexamined—idea that in order to get good health care, people must learn to shop for it. Remaking the American Patient explores the consequences of the consumer economy and American medicine having come of age at exactly the same time. Tracing the robust development of advertising, marketing, and public relations within the medical profession and the vast realm we now think of as 'health care,' Tomes considers what it means to be a 'good' patient. As she shows, this history of the coevolution of medicine and consumer culture tells us much about our current predicament over health care in the United States." (University of North Carolina Press, 2016)

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Publisher's description: "Going far beyond basic historical information, this two-volume work examines the deep roots of Mexican culture and their meaning to modern Mexico. In this book, readers will find rich, in-depth treatments by renowned as well as up-and-coming scholars on the most iconic people, places, social movements, and cultural manifestations—including food, dress, film, and music—that have given shape and meaning to modern Mexico and its people." (ABC-Clio, 2015)

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Publisher's description: "This examination of the formally autonomous state of Hyderabad in a global comparative framework challenges the idea of the dominant British Raj as the sole sovereign power in the late colonial period. Beverley argues that Hyderabad's position as a subordinate yet sovereign 'minor state' was not just a legal formality, but that in exercising the right to internal self-government and acting as a conduit for the regeneration of transnational Muslim intellectual and political networks, Hyderabad was indicative of the fragmentation of sovereignty between multiple political entities amidst Empires. This book recasts the political geography of late imperialism and historicizes Muslim political modernity in South Asia and beyond." (Cambridge University Press, 2015)

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Publisher's description: "In Dark Mirror, Sara Lipton offers a fascinating examination of the emergence of anti-Semitic iconography in the Middle Ages. The straggly beard, the hooked nose, the bag of coins, and gaudy apparel—the religious artists of medieval Christendom had no shortage of virulent symbols for identifying Jews. Yet, hateful as these depictions were, the story they tell is not as simple as it first appears." (Metropolitan Books, 2014)

Masten Art Work

Publisher's description: "Art Work recaptures the unfamiliar cultural landscape in which spirited young women, daring social reformers, and radical artisans succeeded in reuniting art and industry. In this interdisciplinary study, April F. Masten situates the aspirations and experience of these forgotten women artists, and the value of art work itself, at the heart of the capitalist transformation of American society." (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2014)

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Publisher's description: "Who Shall Enter Paradise? recounts in detail the history of Christian-Muslim engagement in a core area of sub-Saharan Africa's most populous nation, home to roughly equal numbers of Christians and Muslims. it is a region today beset by religious violence, in the course of which history has often been told in overly simplified or highly partisan terms. This book reexamines conversion and religious identification not as fixed phenomena, but as experiences shaped through cross-cultural encounters, experimentation, collaboration, protest, and sympathy." (Ohio University Press, 2014)
 

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Publisher's description: "Biography of a Hacienda is a many-voiced reconstruction of events leading up to the Mexican Revolution and the legacy that remains to the present day. Drawing on ethnohistorical, archaeological, and ethnographic data, Elizabeth Terese Newman creates a fascinating model of the interplay between the great events of the Revolution and the lives of everyday people." (University of Arizona Press, 2014)

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Publisher's description: "California now has more trees than at any time since the late Pleistocene. This green landscape, however, is not the work of nature. It’s the work of history. Rich in character and story, Trees in Paradise is a dazzling narrative that offers an insightful, new perspective on the history of the Golden State and the American West." (W.W. Norton, 2013)

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Publisher's description: "In the mid-eighteenth century, colonial Americans became enamored with the rich colors and silky surface of mahogany. This exotic wood, imported from the West Indies and Central America, quickly displaced local furniture woods as the height of fashion. Over the next century, consumer demand for mahogany set in motion elaborate schemes to secure the trees and transform their rough-hewn logs into exquisite objects. But beneath the polished gleam of this furniture lies a darker, hidden story of human and environmental exploitation." (Harvard University Press, 2012)

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Publisher's description: "Although suburb-building created major environmental problems, Christopher Sellers demonstrates that the environmental movement originated within suburbs—not just in response to unchecked urban sprawl. Sellers shows how the philosophy, science, and emotions that catalyzed the environmental movement sprang directly from suburbanites' lives and their ideas about nature, as well as the unique ecology of the neighborhoods in which they dwelt." (University of North Carolina Press, 2012)
 

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Publisher's description: "Japan's invasion of Manchuria in September of 1931 initiated a new phase of brutal occupation and warfare in Asia and the Pacific. It forwarded the project of remaking the Japanese state along technocratic and fascistic lines and creating a self-sufficient Asian bloc centered on Japan and its puppet state of Manchukuo. In Planning for Empire, Janis Mimura traces the origins and evolution of this new order and the ideas and policies of its chief architects, the reform bureaucrats." (Cornell University Press, 2011)

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Publisher's description: "Gary Marker traces the Russian veneration of St. Catherine of Alexandria from its beginnings in Kievan times through the onset of female rulership in the 18th century. Two narratives emerge. The first focuses on St. Catherine within Christendom and, specifically, within Russia. The second shifts attention to the second wife of Peter the Great, Catherine I, who became Russia’s first crowned female ruler. Marker then explores the evolution of divine queenship and the Catherine cult through the reigns of Elizabeth and Catherine the Great." (Northern Illinois University Press, 2011)

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Publisher's description: "Gootenberg traces cocaine's history from its origins as a medical commodity in the nineteenth century to its repression during the early twentieth century and its dramatic reemergence as an illicit good after World War II. Connecting the story of the drug's transformations is a host of people, products, and processes: Sigmund Freud, Coca-Cola, and Pablo Escobar all make appearances, exemplifying the global influences that have shaped the history of cocaine. But Gootenberg decenters the familiar story to uncover the roles played by hitherto obscure but vital Andean actors as well." (University of North Carolina Press, 2008)

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Publisher's description: "Shrouded in the lore of legendary Indians, Mt. Timpanogos beckons the urban populace of Utah. And yet, no 'Indian' legend graced the mount until Mormon settlers conjured it—once they had displaced the local Indians, the Utes, from their actual landmark, Utah Lake. On Zion’s Mount tells the story of this curious shift. It is a quintessentially American story about the fraught process of making oneself 'native' in a strange land. But it is also a complex tale of how cultures confer meaning on the environment—how they create homelands." (Harvard University Press, 2008)

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Publisher's description: "In the wake of expanding commercial voyages, many people in early modern Europe became curious about the plants and minerals around them and began to compile catalogs of them. Drawing on cultural, social and environmental history, as well as the histories of science and medicine, this book argues that, amidst a growing reaction against exotic imports—whether medieval spices like cinnamon or new American arrivals like chocolate and tobacco—learned physicians began to urge their readers to discover their own 'indigenous' natural worlds." (Cambridge University Press, 2007)

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Publisher's description: "In this important volume, Herman Lebovics, a preeminent cultural historian of France, develops a historical argument with striking contemporary relevance: empire abroad inevitably undermines democracy at home. These essays, which Lebovics wrote over the past decade, demonstrate the impressive intellectual range of his work. Focusing primarily on France and to a lesser extent on the United Kingdom, he shows how empire and its repercussions have pervaded—and corroded—Western cultural, intellectual, and social life from the mid-nineteenth century to the present." (Duke University Press, 2006)

 

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Publisher's description: "In Bringing the Empire Back Home, the inventive cultural historian Herman Lebovics provides a riveting account of how intense disputes about what it means to be French have played out over the past half-century, redefining Paris, the regions, and the former colonies in relation to one another and the world at large. In a narrative populated with peasants, people from the former colonies, museum curators, former colonial administrators, left Christians, archaeologists, anthropologists, soccer players and their teenage fans, and, yes, leading government officials, Lebovics reveals contemporary French society and cultures as perhaps the West’s most important testing grounds of pluralism and assimilation." (Duke University Press, 2004)

Larson Trials

Publisher's description: "Nowhere in Latin America were postcolonial transitions more turbulent than in the Andes, where communal indigenous roots grew deep and where the 'Indian problem' seemed so discouraging to liberalizing states. The analysis raises broader issues about the interplay of liberalism, racism, and ethnicity in the formation of exclusionary 'republics without citizens' over the nineteenth century." (Cambridge University Press, 2004)

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Publisher's description: "This volume provides a succinct, analytical, well-conceived, and nicely written account of the development of colonial North American thought and culture from 1680 to the eve of the American Revolution. It situates the subject firmly within a transatlantic context. The author emphasizes the extent to which improving communications and expanding connections helped to incorporate colonial settlers into a larger British world by providing them access and inviting them to become contributors to a burgeoning public culture of print, which consisted of newspapers, magazines, books, and letters." (Cornell University Press, 2000)

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