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  • Program Overview

    English Department

    Through our graduate programs, Stony Brook’s English Department participates in learning communities around the world. Professionals with Stony Brook English degrees teach in secondary schools, colleges and universities, present research at scholarly conferences, and write for specialized and general-interest audiences.

    Students enrolled in the Master of Arts program pursue a course of study that includes courses in historical periods, literary genres, topics in gender, race and cultural studies, and various writing workshops. The program offers students the opportunity to broaden as well as deepen their knowledge of literature while also developing their own writing skills. This course of study leads to the Master of Arts degree and requires 30 credits, including a master’s thesis, for completion. While pursuing the M.A. in English, students may also earn an interdisciplinary graduate certificate in women’s studies, cultural studies, or composition studies.

    Students enrolled in the Ph.D. program pursue a course of study that is designed, in large part, around individual interests and that moves from a broad-based survey to a more narrowly focused specialization. Eleven courses are required of each student. EGL 600, The Discipline of Literary Studies, must be taken during the first fall semester in which it is offered, as it introduces students to the variety of approaches to literature represented in current criticism. Students select their remaining courses in consultation with faculty advisors; these courses are intended to strengthen the student’s literary background and theoretical knowledge, and further define chosen areas of inquiry. To accommodate the latter goal, students may take courses in other departments with approval from the graduate director. While pursuing the Ph.D. in English, students may also earn an interdisciplinary graduate certificate in women’s studies, cultural studies, or composition studies.

    Corresponding to the pattern of study that underlies the Ph.D. program are the oral examination and the dissertation prospectus meeting. The first, a three-hour general examination taken by the end of the fifth semester, enables each student to concentrate on three literary periods or two literary periods and one issue, genre, or theory relevant to the student’s interests. At the prospectus meeting, held by the end of the sixth semester, the student discusses the dissertation topic with faculty advisors and develops a plan for completion of the project.

    Ph.D. students receiving financial support teach one course each semester. Teaching assignments are varied and flexible. Teaching assistants teach courses in composition or introductory courses in literature, and assist professors in large lecture courses. During their first semester of teaching writing at Stony Brook, students must enroll in the Teaching Practicum, which provides them with pedagogical theory and teaching supervision All Ph.D. students on financial support must be registered as full-time students. 

  • Admissions

    Admission requirements of English department

    Applicants for admission to all graduate programs in English should submit all materials by January 15 for fall semester admission. In all cases, admission is determined by the graduate admissions committee of the department under guidelines established by the Graduate School. Applicants are admitted on the basis of their total records, and there are no predetermined quantitative criteria that by themselves ensure a positive or negative decision. There is midyear admission to the M.A. program but not the Ph.D. program. The deadline for spring M.A. admission is October 15.

    About the Graduate Record Examination: All applicants to the Stony Brook University are required to take the general aptitude portion of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE). The English Department does not require applicants to take the subject test.

    Our admissions committee will review an applicant’s file when all documents have been received. This includes the GRE score. Therefore, it is to the student’s advantage to take the exam at the earliest opportunity. We do not admit provisionally. Information about testing dates can be obtained by contacting the Educational Testing Service at www.gre.org. While we have no set cutoff score for admission, we pay special attention to the score on the verbal and analytical writing sections of the examination.

    Admission to the M.A.T. in English 7-12

    The M.A.T. in English 7-12 is administered by the School of Professional Development. Individuals interested in this program should refer to the School of Professional Development’s section in this bulletin.

    Admission to the M.A. Program in English

    The following, in addition to the minimum Graduate School requirements, are required for admission to the M.A. program:

    A. A bachelor’s degree from a recognized institution;

    B. An average of at least B in the last two years of undergraduate work;

    C. An official transcript of all undergraduate work;

    D. Letters of recommendation from three instructors;

    E. The applicant’s score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test, required of all students by the Graduate School;

    F. A writing sample (10 double-spaced pages; page count does not include bibliography);

    G. Acceptance by both the Department of English and the Graduate School.

    Admission to the Ph.D. Program in English

    The following, in addition to the minimum Graduate School requirements, are required for admission to the Ph.D. program:

    A. A bachelor’s degree from a recognized institution;

    B. An average of at least B in the last two years of undergraduate work;

    C. An official transcript of all undergraduate work and of any graduate work that may have been done;

    D. Letters of recommendation from three instructors;

    E. The applicant’s score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test, required by the Graduate School of applicants in all departments;

    F. A writing sample (15-20 double-spaced pages; page count does not include bibliography);

    G. Proficiency in a language other than English, equivalent to two years of college work;

    H. Acceptance by both the Department of English and the Graduate School. 

    Semi-finalists for admission to the PhD program will be invited to a video-conference interview with a member of the Graduate Admissions Committee.

  • Degree Requirements

    Requirements for the M.A. Degree in English

    In addition to the minimum requirements of the Graduate School, the following are required:

    A. Course Requirements

    A master's degree in English requires ten three-credit courses completed with a 3.0 overall grade point average and submission of a master's thesis. Of the ten courses, three, including a required course in the history and structure of the English language (EGL 509 or EGL 510 or approved substitute), must be in linguistics, rhetoric or composition theory (EGL 506 or approved substitute), including problems in the teaching of composition (EGL 592 or approved substitute). Students who demonstrate proficiency in a language other than English are only required to complete two courses in Language and Rhetoric. EGL courses previously taken on the undergraduate level and passed with a grade of B or better may be accepted as fulfilling these requirements but must be replaced with an elective. Students will sign up for three credits of thesis research while writing a master's thesis. The remaining courses must include one course on literature before 1800, and three courses in at least two of the following topic areas (or other courses as approved by the Graduate Program Director):

    EGL 584: Topics in Genre Studies

    EGL 585: Topics in Cultural Studies

    EGL 586: Topics in Gender Studies

    EGL 587: Topics in Race, Ethnic or Diaspora Studies

    EGL 588: Writing Workshop

    Note: Topic courses may be repeated as long as content varies. Courses run through the School of Professional Development are not accepted for English M.A. requirements.

    B. Independent Studies
    Only one course numbered EGL 599, Independent Study, will be permitted to count toward the total courses required for the degree of Master of Arts in English. EGL 599 cannot be elected during the student’s first semester of work toward the master’s degree. EGL 599 may be elected during the second semester only if the student has a B+ average in the first semester and has no Incompletes at the time of registering for EGL 599. A proposal for an EGL 599 course should be submitted in writing to the faculty member under whose direction the student plans to study. This proposal must be submitted before the end of the semester previous to that in which the student will register for EGL 599. The proposal must be approved in writing by both the directing faculty member and the graduate program committee of the English Department before the student registers for EGL 599.

    Only two courses numbered EGL 615, Independent Study, will be permitted to count toward the total courses required for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in English. EGL 615 cannot be elected during the student’s first semester of work toward the doctoral degree. EGL 615 may be elected during the second semester only if the student has a B+ average in the first semester and has no Incompletes at the time of registering for EGL 615. A proposal for an EGL 615 course should be submitted in writing to the faculty member under whose direction the student plans to study. This proposal must be submitted before the end of the semester previous to that in which the student will register for EGL 615. The proposal must be approved in writing by both the directing faculty member and the graduate program committee of the English Department before the student registers for EGL 615.

    C. Competence in a Second Language
    Students have the option of demonstrating competence in a language other than English in lieu of completing one of the three required courses in Language and Rhetoric. This competence may be demonstrated by having completed the second year of a foreign language at the undergraduate level within the past five years with a grade of B or better; by obtaining a grade of B or better on a 500-level reading/translation course or other graduate course offered in a non-English language or literature; or by examination arranged by the English department. The following languages are automatically accepted for fulfilling this requirement: Greek,

    Latin, Hebrew, French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish, Hindu, and Bengali. Other languages relevant to a student’s graduate program may be approved upon petition to the Graduate Program Director.

    D. Master’s Thesis
    Students enroll for EGL 598 while writing a master’s thesis of 30-40 pages under the guidance of a thesis advisor (chosen by the student with approval of Graduate Director) and an additional faculty member chosen by the student and the advisor. A final copy of the thesis and written approvals from the advisor and reader must be submitted to the Graduate School by the last day of classes in the semester in which the student graduates. Students must be registered in the semester in which they graduate.

    Transfer Credit and Standards of Performance in English at the M.A. Level: The department permits the transfer of six hours of credit in suitable graduate work done elsewhere that resulted in a grade of B or better. The student must, however, make special application after admission. In all coursework done at Stony Brook, an average grade of B is the minimum required, but no more than two grades below B- will be permitted. The time limit for completion of the M.A. degree is three years for full-time students and five years for part-time students. Any student who plans not to enroll in classes for a semester must apply for an official leave of absence; failure to do so will lead to a lapse in enrollment. To re-apply, the student must pay a $500 readmission fee.

    Requirements for the Ph.D. Degree

    In addition to the minimum requirements of the Graduate School, the following are required:

    A. Course Requirements
    The minimum course requirement for students in the doctoral program is 11 courses, including at least seven 600-level seminars. No course with a grade below B- may be used to satisfy course requirements. In order to continue in the program, students must maintain an average grade of B or better in all coursework, and no more than two grades below B- will be permitted. No transfer credit is accepted at the seminar level.

    One of the seven seminars the student must satisfactorily complete is the proseminar, EGL 600, The Discipline of Literary Studies. Students must take this course in their first fall semester in the program, or as soon as it is offered.

    While the majority of courses for the Ph.D. requirements must be taken in the English Department, students may, in consultation with their advisors, take courses of an equivalent level in other departments or programs. Requests must be approved in writing by the Graduate Program Director.

    It is assumed that students entering the Ph.D. program will have studied Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, and a variety of literary periods in their B.A. or M.A. programs. However, students with a variety of backgrounds are welcome into the Ph.D. program; those without the kind of broad-based knowledge outlined above will work out a suitable program of study with their advisors.

    Students with teaching assistantships must pass the Teaching Practicum in their first semester of teaching in the Writing Program.

    B. Independent Studies

    Only two courses numbered EGL 615, Independent Study, will be permitted to count toward the total courses required for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in English. EGL 615 cannot be elected during the student’s first semester of work toward the doctoral degree. EGL 615 may be elected during the second semester only if the student has a B+ average in the first semester and has no Incompletes at the time of registering for EGL 615. A proposal for an EGL 615 course should be submitted in writing to the faculty member under whose direction the student plans to study. This proposal must be submitted before the end of the semester previous to that in which the student will register for EGL 615. The proposal must be approved in writing by both the directing faculty member and the graduate program committee of the English Department before the student registers for EGL 615.

    C. Language Requirements
    Students must demonstrate the ability to translate writings of moderate difficulty in one language other than English appropriate to the area of study and hence the ability to make use of relevant literary and scholarly writings in this language. Students can satisfy this requirement in three ways:

    Option I: By obtaining a grade of B or higher in a 500-level reading/translation course or other  graduate course offered in a foreign language or literature. Language courses offered at other institutions will need the approval of the Graduate Program Director to fulfill this requirement.

    Option II: By passing a translation exam (from the foreign language into English). Students may use a dictionary for this exam; passages will be set by examiners from other departments or from English. Contact the Graduate Program Director to arrange an exam.

    Option III: By conducting research in, and translation of, a foreign language in the course of writing a seminar paper submitted in any 600-level course (including EGL 600, the Pro Seminar). Students who select this option must complete the appropriate form before submitting the paper, and their plan must be approved by both the instructor of the seminar and the Graduate Program Director.

    The following languages are automatically accepted for fulfilling the language requirement: Greek, Latin, Hebrew, French, German, Italian, Russian, and Spanish. Other languages relevant to a student’s graduate program may be approved upon petition to the graduate program director.

    Students will not be permitted to take the General Exam without first satisfying the language requirement.

    D. Award of MA Degree to PhD Students

    Students who enroll in the Doctoral Program in English who do not already have an M.A. degree are eligible to earn an M.A. in English. To receive an MA, the student must complete:

    1. 10 three-credit graduate courses with a 3.0 overall grade point average. At least one of these courses must be on a literary historical period before 1800. Only one may be an independent study (EGL 615).
    2. The language requirement for the doctoral program, described below.
    3. An MA thesis. Typically, the thesis will be a revision and expansion of a seminar paper, in response to the thesis advisor’s feedback. The student will not enroll in EGL 598: Thesis Research. Otherwise, the thesis requirements correspond to those for the MA program, described above.

    E. General Examination
    The general examination is a three-part, three-hour oral with three examiners. It must be taken by the end of the fifth semester in the program. The examination committee should be formed no later the fourth semester. The committee is composed of a chairperson selected by the student and two other faculty members appointed by the Graduate Program Director in consultation with the chairperson.

    Two parts of the examination must focus on different literary periods of approximately 100 years each, and the third will either address another literary period or engage a problem or area of special interest (e.g., a genre, issues, or a line of theoretical inquiry).

    In consultation with their examiners, students will offer reading lists for this examination that outline the area of inquiry for each part of their exam. Because one of the purposes of the exam is to give students the opportunity to make sense of their lists, the period lists may or may not vary from the traditional literary historical divisions of the anthologies. Whereas one student may follow traditional texts for a literary period, another may choose to study noncanonical texts within a traditional chronological range, while another may redefine the range (e.g., 1750-1850 or 1850-1945 instead of the 18th century, 19th century, or 20th century).

    In consultation with his or her chairperson, the student may choose to take this exam in two parts. All three committee members must sign all three of the reading lists at least one month prior to the examination. The student must submit to the Graduate Director the signed reading lists along with a memo, stating the names of the members on the committee, one month before the exam.

    Taking this examination brings students a step closer to entering a profession in which one writes and publishes scholarship and constructs and teaches courses. To promote this kind of professional development, to facilitate students’ focus, and to enhance the conversations that make up the examinations:

    1. For the first part, the student will submit to his or her committee, at least two weeks prior to the exam, a 15-30 page paper related to a particular period or problem area. In most cases, this will be a revised seminar paper, and will include a bibliography. The paper is not intended as additional work, but rather as a way for the student to organize an approach to one of the lists. During the exam, the paper will serve as a springboard for discussion of the entire period or area being examined.

    2. For the second part, the student will submit to his or her committee, at least two weeks prior to the exam, a syllabus and bibliography of background reading for an advanced undergraduate course in a particular period or problem area. Questions regarding pedagogical and theoretical approach, as well as inquiries into criteria of selection and content, will help to initiate and focus discussion of the entire period or area being examined.

    3. For the third part, the student may simply invite questions without using one of the above devices, or may submit another paper or syllabus (or some other piece of writing agreeable to the committee) as a means of generating and directing discussion of the entire list.

    Each of the three parts will be judged separately as either pass or fail. Each failed part may be retaken one additional time, no later than a year after the original examination.

    It is the responsibility of the examination committee chairperson to inform the Graduate Office in writing of the date, time, and place of the examination two weeks before the examination.

    F. Dissertation Prospectus and Dissertation Prospectus Meeting 

    The dissertation prospectus meeting is a discussion between the student and a three member faculty committee, including at least two members of the English department, chosen by the student. 

    To schedule the meeting, the student must submit a form to the Graduate Office three weeks prior to the meeting date. The Graduate Office will then schedule a place for the meeting. 

    At least three weeks before the meeting, the student must submit to the committee and the Graduate Office a written statement (the prospectus) of 1500-3000 words (i.e., 7-10 double-spaced pages) describing the dissertation project, with a bibliography of 5-10 double-spaced pages including a preliminary list of the primary and secondary texts that will form the foundation of the dissertation. 

    The focus of the meeting will be the topic that the student has chosen for his or her dissertation along with the proposed plan for advancement to completion of the degree. Thus, the prospectus should embrace the various kinds of texts and the overarching method that the student will engage in order to begin writing the dissertation. The prospectus should not be thought of as a contract; both the prospectus and the meeting work toward the demonstration of a well-wrought initial account of the argument, methods, architecture, scope and scholarly contribution of the project, as it will be realized in the dissertation.

    In order for the student to advance to candidacy, the prospectus must be approved by the committee and the student must submit to the chair of the committee a summary of the conversation at the dissertation prospectus meeting, highlighting the committee’s suggestions. The chair must approve this summary and forward it to the Graduate Office to be placed in the student’s file. If the prospectus is not approved, the student must schedule another dissertation prospectus meeting for a later date.

    All the doctoral requirements described above must be completed before a student is allowed to schedule the prospectus meeting.

    G. Advancement to Candidacy
    After the approval of the prospectus and the summary of the meeting, the student is recommended to the dean of the Graduate School for advancement to candidacy.

    H. Dissertation

    The dissertation is a scholarly monograph of extended scope, written with the guidance of a committee composed of a Director and three readers. At least two of the committee members must be from the English department, and at least three must be from the University. One, the outside reader, must be from a different department at the University or from a different university.  

    In order to establish the working arrangement between the student and the committee members, the semester after the Prospectus Meeting the student should have the director and the readers sign a contract supplied by the Graduate Office. On this contract, each Committee Member indicates whether he or she will read and comment on individual chapters or only on the completed dissertation. When the outside reader is identified, he or she should add his or her signature to the document or send an e-mail message indicating the method of response. 

    At some point during the writing of the dissertation, the dissertation director will call a meeting of the student and all members of the committee with the exception of the outside reader. This meeting can serve to discuss specific chapters, the student’s overall progress, and any other issues as necessary. It will serve as a crucial opportunity to provide clear direction and advice. Either the student or the director can call additional such meetings, but one meeting is required by the program.

    The Dissertation Committee must recommend acceptance of the dissertation before it can be approved by the Graduate School. Students will present the results of dissertation research at a colloquium (the Defense) convened for that purpose by the Department of English, which will be open to interested faculty and graduate students.

    I. The Dissertation Defense
    At least eight weeks before the Graduate School’s deadline for submitting the completed dissertation, the student will submit to his or her readers what is intended to be the final draft of the dissertation. No more than four weeks after that, if the readers have agreed that the dissertation is ready to be defended, the director will schedule the defense. (This is distinct from the actual acceptance of the dissertation, which can take place only at the defense itself.)

    The defense is a formal presentation by the student of the results of the dissertation research at a colloquium convened for that purpose by the Department of English. It will be open to all interested Stony Brook University faculty and graduate students. All members of the Dissertation Committee must be present at the defense; outside readers may participate via videoconference.

    J. Teaching Program
    Training in teaching is stressed by the department, and every student should expect to teach as part of the doctoral program. Teaching assistants instruct in a variety of courses, introductions to poetry, fiction, and drama, and assist in large lecture courses. An important part of the teaching experience is the Practicum in Teaching, required of all teaching assistants.

    K. Residency Requirement
    The Graduate School requires at least two consecutive semesters of full-time graduate study beyond the baccalaureate. Students will be considered in full-time residence during any semester in which they (1) are taking at least one 500-level course or 600-level seminar or are, in the opinion of the graduate program committee, properly preparing for the special field oral examination; (2) are holding no position other than that required under the teaching program; or (3) are registered for EGL 699 Dissertation Research or EGL 690, Directed Reading for Doctoral Candidates, for three, six, nine, or 12 credit hours, depending on the number of other courses being taken, and the teaching assignment. The total of all these credits and teaching hours is to be no more than 12 for G3, 9 for G4, and 6 for G5 students.

    L. Time to Degree
    Students are expected to complete the PhD in six years or less, meeting the benchmarks stipulated in the PhD Handbook, including:

    • By the end of second year
      • Required course work must be completed with a 3.50 GPA or better
      • Language requirement must be fulfilled
      • Three lists for General Exam must be submitted
    • By end of third year
      • General Exam completed (Fall)
      • Prospectus Meeting completed (Spring)
    • By end of sixth year
      • Dissertation defended

    M. Advising and Review of Student’s Progress
    Each incoming student will meet with an assigned advisor before the start of classes to plan his or her first semester’s coursework. The student will also meet with his or her advisor in November and May before pre-registration for each semester’s courses. Students will meet at least once each semester with advisors to plan their coursework.

    Each spring semester, the graduate program committee will review each student’s progress and determine whether the student may proceed with doctoral studies, may continue if certain requirements are met, or may not continue in the doctoral program because of unsatisfactory work. In order to retain financial support, teaching assistants must maintain a 3.5 GPA, in addition to satisfying the program requirements described above.

    Matters Pertaining to All Advanced Degrees in English

    A. Extension of time limits: Extensions of time limits are granted at the discretion of the graduate program director of the department and the dean of the Graduate School and are normally for one semester at a time.

    B. Incompletes: Faculty may choose to grant graduate students an Incomplete.  However, the Incomplete must be made up--the work must be submitted to the faculty member--on or before the beginning of the next semester.  Students who take Incompletes in the fall must finish their work before the first day of class in January, and those who take Incompletes in the spring must finish their work before the first day of class in September. Students who have special circumstances that justify having more time to make up the Incomplete should meet with the Graduate Director, then file a written request for an extension. The Graduate Director will make a decision on each case in consultation with the Graduate Program Committee.  

    C. Graduate courses in the 500 series are open to all graduate students. Courses in the 600 series are normally open only to students admitted to study for the Ph.D. degree, although M.A. students with adequate preparation and background can sometimes be admitted with the permission of the instructor. All graduate courses normally carry three credits. Each course in the 500 and 600 series to be offered in a given semester will be described by the instructor in some detail in a special departmental announcement prepared and distributed toward the end of the semester prior to that in which it is to be offered. None of the courses numbered 690-699 can be taken to satisfy the requirement of seven seminars as stated in the sections outlining course requirements for the English Department. Courses run through the School of Professional Development are not accepted for the requirements of the degree.

    D. Advising: There are a number of problems that the preceding explanations make no attempt to cover; students are encouraged to raise individual questions about the graduate program with the graduate program director in English. 

  • Facilities
  • Faculty

    Faculty of English Department

    Distinguished Professors

    Kaplan, E. Ann1, 1970, Rutgers University: Literary and film theory; feminist studies; modern American literature; 19th-century American literature; postcolonial British literature; film.

    Rosenblatt, Roger, Ph.D., 1968, Harvard University: Creative writing; 20th-century American literature

    Professors

    Dunn, Patricia A.5, D.A., 1991, The University at Albany: Composition and rhetoric; English education; disability studies.

    Huffman, Clifford C.2, Ph.D., 1969, Columbia University: The Renaissance; Shakespeare.

    Manning, Peter, J.3, Ph.D., 1968, Yale University: English Romantic literature; literary theory.

    Marshik, Celia7, Department Chair. Ph.D., 1999, Northwestern University: British and American modernism, cultural studies, women's studies.

    Munich, Adrienne, Ph.D., 1976, City University of New York: Victorian literature, art, and culture; feminist theory and women’s studies.

    Olster, Stacey4, Ph.D., 1981, University of Michigan: American literature; 20th-century fiction; popular culture; film.

    Spector, Stephen,. Ph.D., 1973, Yale University: Old and Middle English literature; history of the English language; the Bible; intolerance in medieval literature; Christianity and Judaism; drama through Shakespeare; manuscript study and bibliography; the “other” in medieval literature and society.

    Associate Professors

    Cook, Amy8, Ph.D. University of California. Cognitive science and theories of performance and early modern drama.

    Flescher, Andrew6, Ph.D. 2000, Brown University: Medical Humanities, George Bernard Shaw, Narrative Approaches to Ethics, Biomedical ethics; Ethics and Health Care Policy; Ethics of Organ Donation; Compassion and Altruism; Health Care Justice; Normative Ethics; Moral Theory; Religion and Culture; Literature and Film; Hermeneutics

    Haralson, Eric, Ph.D., 1993, Columbia University: 19th- and 20th-century British and American literatures; Anglo-American modernism; Henry James.

    Hutner, Heidi, Ph.D., 1993, University of Washington: Restoration and 18th-century studies; colonial and postcolonial discourse; women writers; women’s studies; eco-feminism.

    Lindblom, Kenneth, Associate Dean for Academic Programs, SPD. Ph.D., 1996, Syracuse University: English education; history, theory, and practice of composition-rhetoric; discourse pragmatics.

    Newman, Andrew, Ph.D., 2004, University of California, Irvine: Early American literatures; Native American studies, media and memory studies.

    Pfeiffer, Douglas, Ph.D., 2005, Columbia University: Renaissance; humanism; history of literary theory and rhetoric; Erasmus; Spenser; Donne.

    Phillips, Rowan Ricardo, Ph.D., 2002, Brown University: Poetry; African-American literature; Caribbean literature; the writing of poetry.

    Robinson, Benedict, Ph.D., 2001, Columbia University: Early modern literature and culture; representations of Islam; religion and literature; Shakespeare; Milton.

    Santa Ana, Jeffrey, Ph.D., 2003, University of California, Berkeley: American literature and culture; Asian American literature and film; Filipino diaspora; global migration and transnationalism; gender and sexuality studies; race and ethnicity; emotion studies.

    Scheckel, Susan, Ph.D., 1992, University of California, Berkeley: 19th-century American literature and culture.

    Assistant Professors

    Graham, Jean Elyse. Yale University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology: digital humanities; print and information systems; the history and theory of technology.

    Johnston, Justin Omar, Ph.D., 2012, University of Wisconsin: Contemporary Anglophone literature; biopolitics and biotechnology in post-1945 novels; feminist theories of embodiment; postcolonial critiques of humanism.

    Rubenstein, Michael, Ph.D., 2003, Rutgers University: British and Anglophone literature after 1945; Irish Studies; modernism, postcolonial literature and theory, and film.

    Tondre, Michael, Ph.D., 2010, University of Michigan: Nineteenth-century British literature; cultural history of science; gender and sexuality studies; aesthetics.

    Full-time Lecturer

    Galante, Nicole. Acting Director, English Teacher Education Program. Ph.D, 2014, Stony Brook University: Critical pedagogy, writing and rhetoric, postcolonial literature, magical realism in the global south, popular culture and new media in global literature 

    Videbaek, Bente,, Ph.D., 1992, Northwestern University: Renaissance drama and theater; Scandinavian literature.

    Affiliated Graduate Faculty

    Faculty members from other departments who may serve as “inside” members of English Ph.D. exam committees (unless they have previously served as “outside” members).

     

    Mary Jo Bona (Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies): Italian American studies; ethnic American women writers; theories of race and ethnicity.

     

     

    Ritch Calvin (Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies) Literary theory, feminist theory, feminist science fiction, Latina literature and culture.

     

    Eugene Hammond, (Program in Writing and Rhetoric): Writing Instruction, Biography, 18th Century Studies, Jonathan Swift.

     

    Robert Kaplan (Program in Writing and Rhetoric): Writing in the Disciplines; writing transfer; Euro-American intellectual history, especially eighteenth-century rhetoric; early American literature; queer theory/gender studies.

     

    Peter Khost (Program in Writing and Rhetoric): Writing program administration, the literature/composition connection, assessing writing, autoethnography, critical university studies, holistic education, and collaboration.

     

     

    John Lutterbie (Department Theatre Arts): Theories of theatre and performance, Co-Director of the Center for Embodied Cognition.

     

     

    Lorenzo Simpson (Philosophy): Critical race theory; Frankfurt school; cosmopolitanism.

     

     

    Roger Thompson, (Program in Writing and Rhetoric):  Rhetoric, literature, writing studies,  veteran studies, environmental studies, trauma studies,  outsider art.

     

     

    Tracey Walters (Africana Studies): African-American; African diasporic writers.

     

     

    Number of teaching, graduate, and research assistants, Fall 2016: 26

    1) Joint appointment, Comparative Literature

    2) Recipient of the State University Chancellor’s Award for Excellence in Teaching, 1993. Recipient of the President's Award for Excellence in Teaching, 1993.

    3) Recipient of the State University Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Faculty Service, 2013.

    4) Recipient of the President's Award for Excellence in Teaching, 1987; Recipient of the State University Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching, 1988

    5) Recipient of State University Chancellor's Award for Excellence in Teaching, 2013

    6) Joint appointment, Program in Public Health

    7) Recipient of the Dean’s Award for Excellence in Graduate Teaching, 2007

    8) Joint appointment, Theatre Arts

  • Contact

    English Department

    Chairperson
    Celia Marshik, Humanities Building 2022 (631) 632-7415

    Graduate Program Director
    Patricia Dunn, Humanities Building 2089 or 2082 (631) 632-7784

    Graduate Coordinator
    Theresa Spadola, Humanities Building 2096 (631) 632-7373

    Degrees Awarded
    M.A. in English; Ph.D. in English 

    Web Site
    http://www.stonybrook.edu/english/

    Application
    https://app.applyyourself.com/AYApplicantLogin/fl_ApplicantLogin.asp?id=sunysb-gs

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