Roland Coffey | Marie Fratto | Bryan Gamble | Lily Ting Hsu

Rachel Jaffe | Joseph Jungermann | James LoPianoAmanda Samojedny

 

Roland Coffey Roland Coffey

Majors: Art History and Criticism; English

Intended graduation date: May 2013

Thesis Title: "The Presence and Function of Boredom in D.H. Lawrence's Novels

Advisor: Celia Marshik

I am interested in British and Irish modernist writers, particularly James Joyce, D.H. Lawrence, and Virginia Woof. I am currently an intern at the Preservation Department located in the Ward Melville Library, and work as a tutor in the University's Writing Center. A paper I wrote for Professor Videbaek's Science Fiction class on Isaac Asimov's I, Robot was published in Sigma Tau Delta's Online Undergraduate Journal Mind Murals. I also presented a paper on Georgia O'Keeffe's paintings of New York City and flowers at Baker University's Undergraduate Art History Conference in Baldwin City, Kansas. Although I will begin my graduate studies in Art History later this year, I intend to apply to both English MA and Ph.D. programs in the future. The Honors program in English at Stony Brook University is unique in that the seminar environment of honors classes not only offers students a challenging curriculum, but also the opportunity to have engaging and life sustaining discussions about literature with both our peers and professors.

 

Marie Fratto

Marie Fratto

Majors: English; Linguistics

Intended graduation date: May 2013

Thesis Title: "The Mind in Modern Poetry and Fiction"

Advisor: Celia Marshik

Outside of English literature, some of my interests include watching episodes of Columbo, and listening to 70's pop music.  I appreciate that the English Honors Program has given me the opportunity to learn about literature in a small personal setting, drastically different from the big lecture hall setting of many other English courses.  Through working on the English Honors Thesis, I've also been given the chance to explore my own interests and work closely with a professor who I hold in high regard.   

 

 

Bryan Gamble

Bryan Gamble

Major: English

Minor: European History

Intended graduate date: May 2013

Thesis Title: "Of Lions and Bears: The Culture War between Imperial Britain and Russia in the 19th Century"

Advisor: Michael Tondre

I am your typical atypical English student. My passions beyond literature include writing, film, playing and finding new music, and forcing myself in new situations for the sake of adventure. Once I graduate, I intend on going into the editing field and taking some time to figure out if I want to pursue further education. The Honors English program at SBU has given me the opportunity to challenge my academic abilities as a student of literature in smaller classrooms in a friendly, intellectual environment. The work, albeit heightened, was worth my investment through the sheer amount of new, interesting things I learned that I simply would not have found outside the program. I encourage students seeking a challenge beyond typical undergraduate English to consider the program for the wealth of knowledge it offers.

 

Lily Ting Hsu

Lily Ting Hsu

Majors: English; Applied Math and Statistics

Intended graduation date: Fall 2013

Thesis topic: I’m working on developing a thesis that will examine how Robert Frost’s adherence and intentional deviation from metrical norms functions in relationship to the thematic content of his poems. I’m also working to incorporate a creative aspect my thesis. 

I’ve spent all four years of my undergraduate career at Stony Brook and love it here. I find the honors program to be an especially great experience because, in addition to giving me the opportunity to sit in on small seminar classes and build relationships with professors, it also creates a sense of community for its students in an otherwise large major. My favorite aspect of Stony Brook is the diverse student body, and I find that in the Honors English program I benefit not only from being exposed to diverse backgrounds, but also diverse interests within the study of English literature. Personally, I am particularly interested in poetic form. I am considering applying to graduate school in Architecture where I hope to be able further pursue the idea of connecting thematic elements to a physical form. 

 

Rachel Jaffe

Rachel Jaffe

Majors: English; Environmental Humanities

Intended graduation date: May 2013

Thesis: I am trying to answer the question “Why do we need to start taking science fiction literature more seriously?” I show how science fiction literature has the ability to teach responsibility to scientists, promote innovations and interest in the sciences, and teach long-term decision-making to students. As a part of answering this question, I am doing a study, as well as a creative project. For my creative project, I hope to explore how writing changes when it is linked to physical locations, and how science fiction literature might be used to start a dialogue about Stony Brook’s “Project Fifty Forward.”

Advisors: Peter Manning and Bente Videbaek

I love reading science fiction. However, within science fiction, the running theme is how people use new technologies before understanding them, and disaster ensues. I want to study the interconnections between emerging technologies, and how they shape our interactions with both each other and the places around us. To that end, I hope to get my Ph.D. and work on how we can plan better cities. The professors in the Honors Program have helped me on this journey by supporting my odd approach to English literature, and allowing me to run with my crazy ideas. The students in the Honors Program have also really been there for me, both inspiring me by their own intellect and pushing me to my fullest potential. 

 

Joseph Jungermann Joseph Jungermann

Major: English

Intended graduation date: Fall 2013

Interests: My interests lie in the area of Early 20th Century American Literature (1919-1945) with a specific focus on works that occurred during the WWI, WWII, and Depression era.  I also focus on the rise of modernism in American literature, and the study of social ethnographic features of American civilization during the early 20th century.

I’ve always had a deep passion for literature even as a child. I remember being really small and reading Dr. Seuss’s “Green Eggs & Ham” at my desk in my kindergarten class and I just fell in love with the flow of the words and the imagery that the phrases seemed to create as they glided whimsically across the page. After many inspiring relationships with teachers and professors along the years, my love for English literature would manifest itself in to the desire to become an English professor. I plan on graduating in the fall of 2013 with my bachelor’s degree in Arts from Stony Brook University, and then move on to graduate school to pursue a masters and PhD in American Literature. What I like about the honors program at Stony Brook University is that the program offers small classes that make interaction with students and professors more direct and personable. It’s easy to get lost in a lecture hall of 150+ students, but taking these honors courses has given me the opportunity to situate myself in a focused atmosphere with students who share similar interests and educational desires. The program is rather challenging, but also rewarding because the professors who teach these courses not only have a very impressive resume of accolades, and research and writing experience outside of the university, but also display a level of professionalism and caring that I believe is unmatched by most top universities.

 

James LoPiano

James LoPiano

Majors: English; Cinema and Cultural Studies

Intended graduation date: May 2013

Thesis Title: "The Fantastic Ending: A Stylistic Approach to Fantasy in Film and Literature"

Advisor: Bente Videbaek

I am interested in the ability to play with the experiences of an audience through the use of sign and language. Studying both literature and film as texts that employ symbols to create meaning with interpretations of audiences, I am combining the English and Cinema & Cultural Studies majors to pursue a career in the media. The craft of storytelling has never been so widely put to use for profit as it is today, delivering knowledge and content across a platform of mediums available to households around the world. Professionals in the entertainment business are out there making magical experiences more realistic every day with innovative techniques for weaving a tale. One day, I hope to sell my own stories—whether they are written with the word or the lens.

 

Amanda Samojedny

Amanda Samojedny

Major: English

Intended graduation date: May 2014

I am a newer member of the honors program. I work at the Writing Center and intend to pursue an MBA degree. I really appreciate the intimate class setting within the honors program. The smaller classes really enable us to develop close relationships with each other. The curriculum is definitely challenging, but the support of our small peer community promotes everyone's success. 

 

 

 

  

Department of English, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5350 - Undergraduate: 631 632-7400 | Graduate: 631 632-7373