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New Publication from the CBPE! 

Congratulations, Oleg Sminov, Reuben Kline, and Autumn Bynum on the publication of their lead article "Passive non-participation versus strategic defection in a collective risk social dilemma," in the Ostrom Special Edition of the Journal of Theoretical Politics

Abstract: Empirical evidence suggests that non-participation underlies a variety of social dilemmas. In collective risk social dilemmas (CRSD), non-participation is viewed as strategic defection—a selfish behavior that increases individual utility at the cost of the group. We conducted a hybrid laboratory-then-online experiment to examine if non-participation in a CRSD may be fundamentally different from the act of strategic defection. We confirmed that non-participation is a problem in a social dilemma. When participation is required, a randomly formed group of subjects was virtually certain to reach the loss prevention threshold (0.999 probability). On the other hand, when an empirically realistic non-participation option was introduced, the probability of reaching the goal by a randomly formed group decreased to 0.599. We also found evidence that the profile of a typical non-participant does not fit the profile of a strategic defector. Non-participants in the experiment were highly cooperative when they had to make a contribution decision. Non-participants in the experiment did not try to increase their payoffs, including in the treatment condition when non-participation led to a default contribution of 100% of the subject’s endowment.

You can read the full article here: http://jtp.sagepub.com/content/early/recent

In the Press

Peter DeScioli, Assistant Professor in Department of Political Science at Stony Brook University and Associate Director of the Center for Behavioral Political Economy spoke to the press about his recent project, titled “Equity or equality? Moral judgments follow the money,”. This study was recently published in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B finds that people are quick to change their moral values depending on which rule means more cash for them instead of others.  

See here for more details - http://sb.cc.stonybrook.edu/news/general/141031moralvalues.php

Congrats Peter !

 

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