Major and Minor in Comparative Literature (CLT)

The Comparative Literature major and minor allow students to study literature across national, linguistic, and disciplinary boundaries, focusing on the global movement of people, ideas and cultures and stressing the ability to read literature in a language other than English. Students have the opportunity to examine literature’s relation to more recent forms of communication, such as cinema, digital media, and new media, and to cultural and intellectual phenomena including colonialism, postcolonialism, diaspora, migration, urbanization, feminism, and queer studies. The goal of this interdisciplinary and comparative approach is to equip students with cultural literacy so that they may exercise global citizenship within a broad historical perspective. The program of study is organized around core courses in Comparative Literature, which students supplement with courses relevant to their interests in the Department of Cultural Analysis and Theory’s majors in Cinema and Cultural Studies and Women’s and Gender Studies, as well as in relevant outside programs and departments. This major is ideal for students seeking a flexible, yet focused program of study that will allow them to explore literature’s relation to pressing social, cultural, and historical issues.

Requirements for the Major in Comparative Literature

Students who enrolled in the CLT Major or Minor before Fall 2014 will abide by the previous requirements (listed on their Major or Minor Worksheets)

If you are enrolled in the CLT Major or Minor beginning Fall 2014 you must adhere to the following requirements:

The interdisciplinary major in Comparative Literature leads to the Bachelor of Arts degree. The following courses are required and must be taken for a letter grade. All upper-division courses offered to satisfy major requirements must be passed with a grade of C or higher.

Completion of the major requirements entails 33 credits.

A. Five core courses: 

1. Two introductory courses:

2. Theory Course / Upper-Division Writing Requirement:

    • CLT 301 (Note: For students whose first major is in Spanish Language and Literature, SPN 312 can be accepted for this requirement.)

      Upper-Division Writing Requirement: 

      For all majors, the term paper for required course CLT 301 is evaluated by the instructor for its quality of writing.  Students whose writing is satisfactory fulfill this requirement with that paper.  Students who do not fulfill the requirement in CLT 301 must submit to the major advisor a portfolio of papers written for subsequent upper-division courses taken for the major no later than the first semester of senior standing, and must achieve an evaluation of S (satisfactory) on the portfolio. For further details, consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies.CLT 301 also satisfies the Stony Brook Curriculum learning outcome WRTD. 

      Students should consult with the department advisor to ensure that their plan for completing the Upper Division Writing Requirement is consistent with  university graduation requirements for General Education.  Students completing the Stony Brook Curriculum (SBC) must complete a course that satisfies the "Write Effectively within One's Discipline" (WRTD) learning objective to graduate.  The Upper Division Writing Requirement is consistent in most cases with the SBC learning outcomes for WRTD.

3.  Senior Project:  

    • A directed study project (CLT 487 or, for students in the honors program, CLT 495) for graduating majors, to be arranged with the major advisor and an instructor of the student’s choice no later than the end of the first semester of senior standing. 

4.  Literature in the Original Language: at least one course from B (Area Electives) or C (Comparative Electives) below should fulfill this requirement for a course in literature in its original language (other than English).

B. Area Electives: three courses beyond the introductory level that explore literature of a specific regional or national area, chosen from the following:

AAS 320AAS 321AAS 322AAS 326AAS 327AAS 332CLL 215CLS 225CLT 220CLT 235CLT 266CHI 412CHI 421CHI 422, EGL 200-level (except EGL 285 and EGL 286), EGL 300EGL 302EGL 304EGL 306EGL 310EGL 312,EGL 314EGL 316EGL 318EGL 320EGL 321EGL 322EGL 340EGL 342EGL 344EGL 345EGL 346EGL 347EGL 348EGL 349EGL 350EGL 352EGL 354EGL 360EGL 361EGL 362EGL 363EGL 364FRN 395FRN 396FRN 433,FRN 434FRN 435FRN 436GER 344GER 402GER 404HUG 321HUI 331ITL 395ITL 396ITL 431ITL 432ITL 434ITL 435JDH 261LAT 251LAT 252MVL 241SPN 312SPN 395SPN 396SPN 397SPN 398SPN 445

Note:  Most of the upper-division electives in other departments have prerequisites. Plan your program of study with this in mind and, if desired, consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies for help.

C. Comparative Electives: four upper-division courses, at least two from Group 1.

Group 1 (Literature): Courses that examine literature according to comparative methods (feminist and queer theories, colonialism, migration, or diaspora, race and ethnicity, cultural studies, etc.) 

AAS 305/EGL 305AAS 328AAS 331AAS 473AFH 329/HUF 318AFH 330AFH 368AFH 379/PHI 379AFH 385/HUF 385AFH 390AFH 391AFH 417CLT 330CLT 334CLT 361CLT 362CLT 363CLT 371/PHI 371CLT 391CLT 392CLT 393CLT 394EGL 333EGL 367EGL 368EGL 369EGL 371EGL 372EGL 373EGL 374EGL 375EGL 376EGL 377,EGL 378EGL 379EGL 389/AST 389EGL 390EGL 391EGL 392EGL 393EGL 394EGL 395EGL 397EGL 398EGL 399FRN 423/AFH 423FRN 438HUR 341PHI 371PHI 380SPN 405SPN 410SPN 415SPN 435WST 315/CLL 315,WST 372WST 382/EGL 382/AFH 382WST 390WST 391

Group 2 (Other Forms of Cultural Production): Courses that explore other forms of cultural production (cinema, visual art, music, performance, etc.).  

AMR 390AMR 395AMR 397ARH 315ARH 322ARH 324ARH 329ARH 330ARH 333ARH 336ARH 344, ARH 345,ARH 346ARH 347CCS 301CCS 311CCS 312CCS 313CCS 324/MUS 324CCS 390CCS 391CCS 392CCS 393,CCS 394CCS 395CCS 396CCS 397CDT 317CDT 318CDT 341CLT 335HUI 338MUS 300MUS 307MUS 308,MUS 310MUS 311MUS 314MUS 320SPN 405SPN 420THR 312THR 313THR 315THR 316THR 334THR 344,THR 354THR 403

Note:  Most of the upper-division electives in other departments have prerequisites. Plan your program of study with this in mind and, if needed, consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies for help.

Honors

Students who have maintained a grade point average of 3.50 in the major and 3.00 overall may seek a degree in Comparative Literature with honors.

Honors students must use CLT 495 to fulfill their senior project requirement.

The honors program requires one of the following options in addition to the requirements of the major. Circle a, b, or c and describe how you fulfilled the selected requirement on the line below:

a.  A second course in literature in the original language used for Requirement A.4.

b.  Study of a language other than that used for Requirement A.4 through the intermediate level.

c.  Fulfillment of the requirements for the minor in a cognate discipline (to be approved by the major advisor; minors in language or literature recommended).

The Minor in Comparative Literature

The following courses are required and must be taken for a letter grade. All upper-division courses offered to satisfy the minor requirements must be passed with a grade of C or higher.

Completion of the minor requires 18 credits.

A. Three core courses: 

  • CLT 101
  • CLT 301 (Note: For students whose first major is in Spanish Language and Literature, SPN 312 can be accepted towards this requirement)
  • Literature in the original language: at least at least one course from B (Area Electives) or C (Comparative Electives) below should fulfill this requirement for a course in literature in its original language (other than English).

B.  Area Electives:  two courses beyond the introductory level that explore literature of a specific regional or national area, chosen from the following: 

AAS 320AAS 321AAS 322AAS 326AAS 327AAS 332CLL 215CLS 225CLT 220CLT 235CLT 266CHI 412CHI 421CHI 422, EGL 200-level (except EGL 285 and EGL 286), EGL 300EGL 302EGL 304EGL 306EGL 310EGL 312,EGL 314EGL 316EGL 318EGL 320EGL 321EGL 322EGL 340EGL 342EGL 344EGL 345EGL 346EGL 347EGL 348EGL 349EGL 350EGL 352EGL 354EGL 360EGL 361EGL 362EGL 363EGL 364FRN 395FRN 396FRN 433,FRN 434FRN 435FRN 436GER 344GER 402GER 404HUG 321HUI 331ITL 395ITL 396ITL 431ITL 432ITL 434ITL 435JDH 261LAT 251LAT 252MVL 241SPN 312SPN 395SPN 396SPN 397SPN 398SPN 445

Note: Most of the upper-division electives in other departments have prerequisites. Plan your program of study with this in mind and, if needed, consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies for help.

C. Comparative Electives: two upper-division courses, at least one from Group 1.

 Group 1 (Literature): Courses that examine literature according to comparative methods (feminist and queer theories, colonialism, migration, or diaspora, race and ethnicity, cultural studies, etc.) 

AAS 305/EGL 305AAS 328AAS 331AAS 473AFH 329/HUF 318AFH 330AFH 368AFH 379/PHI 379AFH 385/HUF 385AFH 390AFH 391AFH 417CLT 330CLT 334CLT 361CLT 362CLT 363CLT 371/PHI 371CLT 391CLT 392CLT 393CLT 394EGL 333EGL 367EGL 368EGL 369EGL 371EGL 372EGL 373EGL 374EGL 375EGL 376EGL 377,EGL 378EGL 379EGL 389/AST 389EGL 390EGL 391EGL 392EGL 393EGL 394EGL 395EGL 397EGL 398EGL 399FRN 423/AFH 423FRN 438HUR 341PHI 371PHI 380SPN 405SPN 410SPN 415SPN 435WST 315/CLL 315,WST 372WST 382/EGL 382/AFH 382WST 390WST 391

Group 2 (Other Forms of Cultural Production):  Courses that explore other forms of cultural production (cinema, visual art, music, performance, etc.). 

AMR 390AMR 395AMR 397ARH 315ARH 322ARH 324ARH 329ARH 330ARH 333ARH 336ARH 344, ARH 345,ARH 346ARH 347CCS 301CCS 311CCS 312CCS 313CCS 324/MUS 324CCS 390CCS 391CCS 392CCS 393,CCS 394CCS 395CCS 396CCS 397CDT 317CDT 318CDT 341CLT 335HUI 338MUS 300MUS 307MUS 308,MUS 310MUS 311MUS 314MUS 320SPN 405SPN 420THR 312THR 313THR 315THR 316THR 334THR 344,THR 354THR 403

Note: Most of the upper-division electives in other departments have prerequisites. Plan your program of study with this in mind and, if needed, consult the Director of Undergraduate Studies for help.

Undergraduate Advisor for Comparative Literature: Professor Gregory Ruf

Gregory.Ruf@stonybrook.edu|631.632.7652 | 2068 Humanities Building

Course Descriptions via the Undergraduate Bulletin:

http://sb.cc.stonybrook.edu/bulletin/current/academicprograms/clt/courses.php

 

Events

For detailed information click here

Spring 2016

Department:

CAT Graduate Colloquium

Wednesday, February 10th, 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. 

Humanities Institute, Room#1008

Speakers and Titles: 

Spatiality, Cognitive Ecology, Here 

Professor John Lutterbie, "Gutters and Panels"

David Rodriguez, "Environment at Scale"

 

Fall 2015

Cultural Analysis and Theory -Graduate Student Conference

Immunity/Community

2015 Stony Brook University, Dept. of Cultural Analysis and Theory, Graduate Student Conference

Saturday, Nov. 7, 2015

SBU Manhattan

387 Park Avenue South, 3rd Floor

New York, NY 10016


 

2015 CAT Colloquium

Wednesday, October 28th, from 1:00 - 2:20 p.m.

Humanities Institute room#1008

Speakers and Titles:

Professor E.K. Tan, “From Exile to Queer Homecoming: Chen Xue’s A Wife’s Diary (2012)"

Yalda Hamidi, “'Diasporic Literature as a Feminist Genre: Re-reading Persepolis and Reading Lolita in Tehran"

 

Co-Sponsored Events:

Black History Month

Keynote speaker Sonia Sanchez poet, educator, and lecturer on Black Culture and Literature, Women’s Liberation and Racial Justice. 

Wednesday, January 27
1:00 pm to 3:00 pm
Student Activities Center Gelber Auditorium


DANTE WORLDS Echoes, Places, Questions -- A Conference on the 750th Anniversary of Dante's Birth 
Wednesday,  December 2, 2015 
Charles B. Wang Lecture Hall 29:30 am to 5:30 pm

English Graduate Student Conference - Spring 2016
Speaking Text(s): Communication in the Humanities
Faculty

Kadji Amin published "'Blesser' le spectateur blanc américain: Les Nègres aux États-Unis, 1961-64 et 2003" in Études françaises.

Kadji Amin has been awarded a Mellon Postdoctoral Fellowship on SEX at the University of Pennsylvania Humanities Forum for the 2015-16 academic year.

Kadji Amin has been awarded a Humanities Institute at Stony Brook Faculty Fellowship for Spring semester of 2015 for the completion of his book, Queer Attachments.

Raiford Guins "Punk archaeologists" explain that they went looking for more than just video-game cartridges in a New Mexico landfill.  

Nancy Hiemstra has been selected to receive the 2014-15 Graduate and Faculty Research Program in the Arts, Humanities and Lettered Social Sciences.

Robert Harvey has been appointed to the rank of Distinguished Professor.

Izabela Kalinowska-Blackwood is curating a film series at the IWM in Vienna.


Students

Marcus Brock has been selected to receive the Turner Conference Travel Award to participation in the "Audiovisualtopia" taking place in Madrid, Spain beginning on 10/23/2015. 

Beth Tsai has been selected to receive the 2014-15 Graduate and Faculty Research Program in the Arts, Humanities and Lettered Social Sciences.

Kudos Newsletter 

        June 2015


The Humanities Institute

Cultural Analysis and Theory • Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, NY 11794-5355 • Phone: 631.632.7460 • Fax: 631.632.5707
Login to Edit