Joint Appointments

Stony Brook and Brookhaven have instituted a program of Joint Appointments that support the strategic research missions of both institutions.

In general these appointees have a faculty position at Stony Brook and staff positions at Brookhaven, carrying both teaching and research responsibilities.

Joint Appontments and SEED Grants Presentation, March 10, 2014

Meigan Aronson

Our research in experimental condensed matter physics focuses on the properties of magnetic materials, and in particular on understanding the general conditions under which magnetic order is stabilized. We are interested not only on how magnetic moments forms or survive in the metallic environment, but also in the interplay of moment stability and magnetic order. Currently, we have three different projects ongoing in our group.

 Meigan Aronson

Surita R. Bhatia

My group is working (1) on Polymer-Mediated Clustering of Charged Anisotropic Colloids: We explore formation of nanoparticle clusters in dispersions of the model disk-shaped clay laponite. (2) Alginate-based Biomaterials with Enhanced Oxygen Supply and Strength: By incorporating perfluorocarbons into alginate hydrogel formulations, it is feasible to enhance oxygen and carbon dioxide transport within alginate hydrogels. (3) Hydrogels with a Well-Defined Network Topology. Better gaseous exchange may be significant in creating the next generation of biomedical devices, such as artificial tissue implants and wound dressings. Exciting opportunities are afforded by significant advances in polymer chemistry.

 Surita Bhatia

Lars Ehm

Ehm is interested in the connection between atomic structure and macroscopic physical properties in Earth materials at extreme pressure and temperature conditions of the deep Earth. Our goal is to understand the structure, chemistry and properties as well as the processes in Earth’s interior. As we can only directly sample Earth materials from relatively shallow depth, we depend heavily on simulating the conditions of the Earth’s interior in the laboratory. Synchrotron sources, especially the National Synchrotron Light Source, have been an excellent tool for our measurements, since the very bright and intense synchrotron light allows us to penetrate the high pressure vessels and investigate the Earth material directly at the pressure and temperature conditions of interest. The development of new synchrotron instrumentation and sample environments that enable the investigation of materials at extreme conditions is the second focus of the group and goes hand in hand with our research quest of understanding the deep Earth.

 Lars Ehm

Congwu Du

The main focus of Congwu Du’s research is to develop optical imaging tools and apply them for characterization and detection of physiological/pharmacological processes in biological tissue such as brain. Her current projects include the simultaneous detection of the cerebral blood volume and oxygenation as well as intracellular calcium in vivo using fluorescence spectroscopy and photon migration techniques, and multiple wavelength laser speckle imaging. Her long-term goal is to combine optical imaging with other neuroimaging modalities such as optical coherent tomography, MRI and PET for the diagnosis of diseases.

 Congwu Du

Dax Fu

We use an integrated approach of membrane biochemistry and x-ray crystallography to study structures and functions of metal transporters. The current conceptual framework of metallochemistry is inadequate to explain how metal transporters acquire metal ions against thermodynamic gradients while maintaining rapid metal mobility and extraordinary metal selectivity. Metal transporters provide a unique research opportunity for making paradigm-shifting discoveries at the interface of biochemistry and metallochemistry.

 Dax Fu

James Glimm

James Glimm has made fundamental contributions to nonlinear analysis—winning the Amer. Math. Soc. Steele Prize— to quantum field theory—winning the American Physical Soc. Heineman Prize—and to computational fluid dynamics. The Department of Energy adopted Glimm’s front-track methodology for shock-wave calculations, e.g., simulating weapons performance. Glimm is a member of the Nat. Academy of Science and Academia Sinica and is a recipient of the National Medal of Science. In 2007-08, he was President of the Amer. Math Soc.

 James Glimm

Robert B. Grubbs

My research group is interested in the common ground shared by polymer, organic, and materials chemistry and we are involved in the design, synthesis, and characterization of polymer-based organic materials. Polymer physics provides a framework for understanding the basics of copolymer self-assembly in the bulk and in solution and this knowledge, in turn, suggests concepts for the design of novel polymers and copolymers that will organize into predictable arrangements on the nanometer scale. Such assemblies, many inspired by biological systems, are predicted to exhibit novel properties in a range of possible applications. The combination of living anionic, free radical, and cationic polymerization methods can provide access to many possible polymeric structures, and many techniques of organic chemistry are applicable to the modification of these polymers for the preparation of an even larger variety of materials. We use these techniques to realize specifically designed polymeric architectures. Synthesis of these materials is the major focus of the research program, and students will gain experience in many synthetic techniques. A number of techniques for characterization of new materials by established methods (i.e., small-angle scattering, electron microscopy, etc.) at both the molecular level and at longer length scales are also used.

 Robert Grubbs

Robert J. Harrison

Professor Robert Harrison is a distinguished expert in high-performance computing. Through a joint appointment with Brookhaven National Laboratory, Professor Harrison has also been named Director of the Computational Science Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. Harrison comes to Stony Brook from the University of Tennessee and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, where he was Director of the Joint Institute of Computational Science, Professor of Chemistry and Corporate Fellow. He has a prolific career in high-performance computing with over one hundred publications on the subject, as well as extensive service on national advisory committees.

 Robert Harrison

Jiangyong Jia

We are interested in studying the properties of the dense nuclear matter created in elativistic heavy ion collisions. Under extremely high temperature and density, such matter exist in the form of quasi-free quarks and gluons (Quark-Gluon Plasma or QGP), whose interactions are scribed by the Quantum ChromoDynamics theory (QCD). We seek to recreate and study QGP in the laboratory and to understand its underlying QCD theory. Our research is carried out at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL and at the Large Hadron Collider at CERN. Our group is involved with the PHENIX and ATLAS experiments respectively, at each of these accelerator facilities

 Jiangyong Jia

Peter Khalifah

Materials Chemistry, Solid State Chemistry: Periodic solids provide the backbone of the high-tech industry due to their amplification of the interactions between individual atomic and molecular building blocks assembled within their crystalline lattices. This group focuses on designing functionality into crystalline solids using elemental substitution and structural control to fine-tune the energy levels of bulk materials. Our expertise in materials synthesis, structural characterization, and physical properties measurements allows us to tackle all aspects of this “internal design” process.

 Peter Khalifah

Dmitri Kharzeev

Dmitri Kharzeev is interested in all aspects of the modern theory of strong interactions - Quantum Chromo-Dynamics (QCD), and its applications to the description of experimentally accessible phenomena. He is closely involved in theoretical research related to the programs at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at BNL and Large Hadron Collider at CERN. In particular, he studies the ways in which the underlying quark-gluon structure of hadrons and nuclei determines the dynamics of their interactions and the salient features of the visible Universe. Many of these features stem from topology of non-Abelian gauge theories that form the current Standard Model of the physical world. Dmitri also believes that all sub-fields of physics are deeply connected, and cross-disciplinary interactions are necessary for the advancement of science. For example, he argues that topology holds the key to understanding many universal dynamical properties of systems at vastly different scales, from femto-meter (quarks and gluons of QCD), to nano-meter (e.g. topological insulators and graphene), to parsec (e.g. magnetic helicity and polarization of cosmic microwave background).

 Dmitri Kharzeev

Huilin Li

Our research is aimed at understanding the function of biological macromolecules via structural analyses, primarily by cryo-electron microscopy. Cryo-EM is capable of revealing low to medium resolution structures of large protein complexes that are proven difficult for X-ray crystallography or NMR methods.

 Huilin Li

Vladimir N. Litvinenko

Litvinenko joined Brookhaven as a senior physicist in 2003, and he is currently head of the Accelerator Physics Group for Brookhaven's newest facility for nuclear physics research, the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider. After joining BNL in 2003, Litvinenko made critical contributions to R&D on the high-energy electron cooling of RHIC and to discoveries in designing high-brightness electron beam injection to an energy recovery linac machine. He also played a key role in the National Synchrotron Light Source II team developing the design philosophy for this unique light source. With colleagues, he also established the Center for Accelerator Science & Education at Stony Brook University and BNL, where he is a co-director and teaches students. In 2004, the International Free Electron Laser (FEL) community awarded him the FEL Prize for his outstanding contributions for FEL science and technology.

 Vladimir Litvinenko

Devinder Mahajan

Devinder Mahajan, a professor in the Materials Science & Engineering Department and co-director of the Chemical and Molecular Engineering Program at Stony Brook University (SBU) who holds a joint appointment with Brookhaven Lab, has been named a 2011-2012 Jefferson Science Fellow. The Fellowship brings tenured professors of science and engineering to the State Department for one year to advise on science policy issues. Devinder is serving his fellowship in the Bureau for Energy Resources. His research goal is to develop low-carbon energy technologies that will lead to commercialization for the benefit of society and to train students in the next generation of renewable technologies.

 Devinder Mahajan

Emilio Mendez

Emilio Mendez is interested in novel properties of solids with potential for applications in electronics or photonics. In particular, he studies the transport, magneto-transport, and optical properties of semiconductor heterostructures. He has contributed to the elucidation of phenomena such as resonant tunneling, the quantum Hall effects, and the Stark effects in quantum wells and superlattices. He is also explaining the analogies between optical phenomena in semiconductor microcavities and atom-cavity physics and the use of electronic noise to shed light on the mechanisms that govern electrical conduction in solids.

 Emilio Mendez

John Parise

John is interested in the relationships between properties and the underlying atomic arrangements in condensed matter, especially at the extremes of temperature and pressure. Under extreme cond itions the properties of materials can be quite different, and potentially useful, compared to those properties at room conditions. Coupling to theory, preparation of novel states of matter, recovering to room conditions, studying properties and characterizing the atomic arrangements are vital parts of the research program and so coupling to the facilities at Brookhaven is a considerable advantage. John co-directs the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI) which was formed by BNL-SBU to promote interactions, to educate potential users and to help develop the intellectual framework to optimize use of the unique facilities now or soon to be available at Brookhaven. For information on Chemistry projects go to his Department of Chemistry page

 John Parise

Roman Samulyak

Roman Samulyak’s research involves mathematical modeling, numerical algorithms and simulations of complex physics processes in particle accelerators and energy research applications. He has performed numerical studies of liquids mercury targets for future particle accelerators such as the Neutrino Factory/Muon Collider and the Spallation Neutron Source, collective interactions of particles in accelerators, and fueling of thermonuclear fusion devices by the injection of cryogenic pellets.

 Roman Samulyak

Martin A.A. Schoonen

Schoonen's research areas include environmental molecular chemistry, geocatalysis, medical geology, and astrobiology. An expert in synthesis, surface chemistry, and geochemistry of metal sulfides, in particular iron sulfides, his applied research efforts have included geologic sequestration of hydrogen sulfide and carbon dioxide (CO2), development of mineral-based photocatalysts, and development of acid mine drainage abatement technology. His current research projects focus on the role of iron minerals in subsurface CO2 sequestration, the use of metal sulfides as catalysts to degrade organic pollutants, and the role of mineral dust in the onset of lung ailments in US servicemen and women stationed in Iraq and Afghanistan.

 Martin Schoonen

Trevor Sears

High Resolution Spectroscopy and Molecular Dynamics: Research in my group is focused upon the study of high resolution spectroscopy of chemical intermediates and the development of precise and sensitive experimental methods. The spectroscopic methods are also used to investigate the energetics, dynamics and kinetics of collisional processes in the gas phase by following the evolution of a single quantum state of a molecule in time. The goal of this work is a fundamental understanding of chemical processes relatedto combustion. We are interested in the microscopic factors affecting the structure, dynamics and reactivity of short-lived intermediates such as free radicals in gas-phase reactions. Recent work has involved the development of new laser double resonance techniques to investigate higher electronic states of the CH2 radical and sub-Doppler measurements of spectra of the CN radical. In collaboration with Professor P. M. Johnson, laser photoelectron spectroscopy of larger, aromatic, molecules has identified a new pathway, probably involving an isomerization, following electronic excitation of phenylacetylene and a related species, benzonitrile. The experimental work is supported by the use of ab initio electronic structure calculations and both time-dependent and time-independent quantum calculations of nuclear motion.

 Trevor Sears

Esther Takeuchi

The advancement of battery systems with high energy and power densities remains a lynch pin for new generations of energy storage. The full utilization of renewable energy sources such as wind, photovoltaic, hydroelectric, and geothermal power depends on the ability to store energy as in many cases the renewable energy is generated on an intermittent basis. Additionally, portable electronics, hybrid vehicles, electric vehicles, biomedical devices, and aerospace applications demand advanced batteries that can perform safely over many years. Finally, the way in which communities handle power demands through power grids may be affected significantly by new developments in energy storage. Specific areas of research. For next generation primary and secondary battery applications demanding long life, high energy density and high power, new strategies are needed for the rational design of electroactive materials and the concomitant engineering associated with battery design. Professor Takeuchi’s research efforts are collaborative in nature, involving scientists with a variety of research expertise. For example, we have an on-going research interest in the structure / function relationships among electroactive materials and redox properties as related to electrochemical energy storage. We also are actively involved in the synthesis of new electroactive materials and the subsequent analysis involving a variety of chemical and physical properties of materials. Further, we conduct fundamental mechanistic studies involving the complex interplay among redox processes, ion transport, and electrode precipitation / dissolution that are critical to the electrochemistry associated with battery science.

 Esther Takeuchi

Paul Vaska

Our lab develops new instrumentation and processing techniques to enhance the functional capabilities of PET, and also to combine it with synergistic modalities such as MRI to provide unprecedented, multidimensional information for broad applications ranging from the traditional areas of cancer diagnosis and brain research to plant science with the aim of developing improved biofuels.

 Paul Vaska

Michael G. White

DYNAMICS AT SURFACES: Our research is aimed at providing a molecular level understanding of the energetics, dynamics and morphology-dependence of elementary surface reactions that play key roles in energy-related catalysis. Specifically, we are interested in systems involving simple feedstock chemicals (e.g., H2, CO, CO2, O2, CH4), the selective oxidation of C1 and C2 molecules (e.g., CH3OH, C2H4) and reaction systems that have environmental impact (e.g., De-NOx, De-SOx). We approach these problems from a chemical physics perspective in which experiments are designed to probe the adsorbate-metal potential surface and the dynamical paths that lead to reaction. Our experimental program makes extensive use of lasers for both state-selective detection of desorbed products and the photo-initiation of surface processes such as desorption, diffusion, dissociation and reaction. Current studies are focused on understanding the photoinduced reactions on semi-conducting surfaces such as titania (TiO2); whose photoactivity is widely used for removing organic pollutants from air and water, for anti-fogging and self-cleaning surfaces and as a potential photocatayst for solar water splitting.

 Michael G. White

Stanislaus S. Wong

Working on the nanometer scale, one billionth of a meter, requires the ability to synthesize, manipulate, and organize matter in a controllable manner as well as to predict and understand the properties of the resulting structure. Fundamentally, the focus of the nanoscience research in this group is to study discrete, molecular-scale intermolecular interactions. These are critical to understanding problems such as (a) friction, adhesion, and lubrication, important for physics applications; (b) binding energies on surfaces, essential for the design of effective chemical and biological catalysts; as well as (c) phenomena such as chemical and biological self-assembly.

 Stanislaus S. Wong

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