Biotechnology Teaching Laboratories

THE PROGRAM
A hands-on learning experience in a modern molecular biology is available for your students through The Biotechnology Teaching Center.  Your students will apply their classroom knowledge of biology to problem solving in molecular biology, biotechnology and forensics.  Our faculty will guide your students through discussions of recent scientific breakthroughs and the social implications of molecular biology research. 

Our classes are taught by teams of instructors including University faculty and students in the Master of Science Education program.  All lessons are aligned with the New York State Department of Education standards.

THE FACILITIES
The University is readily accessible in its mid-Suffolk location. Parking for school buses is available. Students may bring lunch or purchase it at a cafeteria on campus.

The Biotechnology Teaching Center consists of three laboratories; each laboratory has 12 workstations, accommodating 24 students. This allows us to schedule up to four school groups each day (depending on staffing). Each workstation is equipped with micropipettors, gel apparatus, and power supply. Other laboratory equipment includes microcentrifuges, incubators, water-baths, and thermalcyclers.

THE EXPERIMENTS

Restriction Enzyme Analysis – Varying Enzymatic Conditions
AP Biology and Research classes only (Students must have completed Living Environment)
Students will test and analyze four factors that can affect the function of restriction enzymes.  Students will present their results to their classmates.  Procedures used include:  agarose gel electrophoresis and restriction enzymes (EcoRI, HinDIII, and BamHI) digestion of DNA. This activity requires 4.5 hours at Stony Brook University including lunch.

DNA Restriction Enzyme Analysis 
Students design and analyze their own experiment using agarose gel electrophoresis, bacteriophage DNA and three restriction enzymes (EcoRI, HinDIII, and BamHI).  This laboratory is most appropriate for advanced classes.  This activity requires 4.5 hours at Stony Brook University including lunch. 

Bacterial Transformation
Students genetically engineer bacteria through transformation with plasmid DNA.  Students are directly involved in experimental design and the designation of controls. This laboratory can be adjusted to suit the academic level of the class. This activity requires 3 hours at Stony Brook University (no lunch break during lab).

Polymerase Chain Reaction
Students analyze DNA in food using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and agarose gel electrophoresis.  Classroom discussion links these techniques with applications in forensics, genetic testing and genetic engineering.  This laboratory can be adjusted to suit the academic level of the class. This activity requires 4.5 hours at Stony Brook University including lunch.

Forensics Laboratory
Students apply problem solving skills as they solve a crime using restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis (RFLP) and agarose gel electrophoresis.  In addition to pattern analysis, students use the scientific method to evaluate evidence, formulate a hypothesis, plan and perform an experiment, and analyze the results. This laboratory can be adjusted to suit the academic level of the class. This activity requires 4.5 hours at Stony Brook University including lunch.

SCHEDULING A SCIENCE TEACHING PROGRAM FOR YOUR SCHOOL
Please book labs for your classes as early as possible as we reach our maximum capacity each year.

Times are somewhat flexible. Cost: $24.00 per student per lab.

To schedule your class please call (631-632-9750) or e-mail cesame@stonybrook.edu

STAFF
Joan Kiely, Director
Daniel Moloney
Kristen LaMagna


 

Poster Printing Services

DEADLINES

December 5: Registration deadline for the Protein Modeling Challenge

January 15: Applications for Ph.D. program in Science Education for Fall 2015 semester

January 28: Registration deadline for North American Computational Linguistics Olympiad (NACLO)

UPCOMING PROGRAMS

*NEW* High School Applied Math Program - Fall and/or Spring semesters   

November 21: Physics Open Night - "Is Energy Efficiency the Short Term Answer to Climate Change?" (Dr. Emilio Mendez)

December 5: Astronomy Open Night - "(Super)computing the Stars" (Dr. Adam Jacobs)

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